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January 24, 1937 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-01-24

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4p

THE MICHTIGAN DATILY PAGE THREE

SUNDAY. JAN. 24. 1937

F

yva r. a " .. s 1 11 I 1 41

0

Fuel Supplies,
Police Rushed
To Flood Area
Snow, Cold And Disease
Cause Great Discomfort
Among Refugees
(Continued from Page 1)
quit their dwellings in Ohio and more
than 50,000 in adjacent Kentucky.
At Frankfort, 2,900 convicts were
ordered moved from the floodbound
state reformatory. Twenty-four of
them broke from the prison, and1
plunged into six feet of water from
the overtaxed Kentucky River. One
escaped. The others turned back
under the fire of guards.
Typhoid Warning Issued
Several square miles were sub-
merged in Louisville. Some 6,0001
were homeless. Drinking water was)
rationed. Theatres and schools
closed. Transportation was badly
crippled. Typhoid warnings were
sounded throughout the state. ,
Between 8,000 and 10,000 left their
houses in Paducah, Ky. More than
half the town was inundated. An
appeal for doctors was issued. The
state health department dispatched
nurses and serum by boat. Others
were ordered to isolated Maysville,
and Carrollton, Ky.
Army Seaplanes Used
Fifty river boats were used to carry
supplies to Ohio River towns from
Evansville, Ind. Four army sea-
planes were ordered into operation
there.. A 19 car Coast Guard train
from the east sped 16 boats and 70
men to duty between Cincinnati and
Evansville.
The Coast Guard ordered two am-
phibian planes and 22 boats sent
from the Gulf for emergency service
along the Mississippi at Memphis.
fted Cross Branch
Seeks Flood Fund
American Red Cross aid to the
270,000 homeless in eight states will
require a minimum relief fund of two
million dollars, according to Lewis E.
Ayres, chairman of the local branch
Red Cross, and the amount to be
raised in Washtenaw County is $415,
he said.
Contributions to this disaster drive
can be made at any bank in Ann Ar-
bor or at the Red Cross office, 407
Wolverine Building, he said. The
money collected for this fund will be
used to provide food, shelter, bedding
and medical attention to the flood
sufferers, who have had their mis-
fortune heightened by blizzards and
cold weather in the Mid-West, Mr.
Ayres said.

Where Relentless Rains Sent Swollen Streams To New High
fp
* - ..e-- I
CHICAGO
TOWN i NEW YORK
- INUNDATED P ITSBUGH PHILADELPHIA
LEVEE'-(
CRUSHED; . L --
TOWN TI -
FLOODED 4p a *j gALMOR
DE R AI S " A1"----I-
HA8 E CITIZENS READY / BRIDGE *
TO LEAVE WASHED
107< MA DSONVILE AWAY
--- -
LOWLAND \
DWEL LERS %
FL EE 0100
-Associated Press Photo
This Associated Press map of the Ohio River vall ey, with shaded area representing country inundated
or threatened, shows the situation which prevailed as relentless rains sent swollen rivers to new high levels
in one of the worst floods since 1913. Rivers went over their banks in ten states and it was estimated that
more than 25,040 persons were made homeless.
. .. -__ I

week-end must not be brought into f
Ann Arbor before 12 noon on Friday,
Feb. 12, and must be brought into
Ann Arbor before 12 noon on Friday,
Feb. 12, and must be taken out be-
fore 8 a.m. on Monday morning, Feb.
15.
The foregding will not apply to
those students who possess regular
driving permits. The above permis-
sion will automatically be granted to
this group.
Dean of Students.
Graduate School: All graduates who
expect to complete the requirements
for a degree at the close of the pres-i
ent semester should call at the office
of the Graduate chool, 1006 Angell
Hall, to check their records and to
secure the proper blank to be used
in making application for thebdegree.
This application should be filed not
later than the end of January.
Registration forms for the second
semester are available in the office.
Graduate Students are urged to fill
out the forms in advance as no
special arrangements are being made
for the registration period. Fees
must be paid in Waterman Gymna-
sium, February 11, 12 and 13. The
late registration fee will be charged
beginning Monday, February 15.
New students, or students trans-
ferring, should, at an early date, ask
the Secretary of their School or
College to prepare and send to the
office of the Graduate School an
official transcript of their under-
graduate records. New students are
advised to apply for admission in
advance of registration.
Student Loans: Any applicant for
a loan for the second semester who
has not already had an interview
with the Loan Committee should
make an appointment at once in
Room 2. University Hall.
February and June Seniors: Col-
lege of L.S. and A., Schools of Edu-
cation, Forestry and Conservation,
and Music: Tentative candidates for
degrees in February should obtain
the proper blanks for diploma ap-
plications in Room 4, U. Hall, and
when filled out leave them with the
assistant at the counter not later
t than Feb. 12.
June seniors should fill out the
diploma applications when registra-

tion material is called for in Room
4, U. Hall.
Hygiene Lectures - Women Stu-
dents: The list of students who
passed the examination given in the
Hygiene Lectures in the fall is posted
on the bulletin board in Barbour
Gymnasium.
Those students who took the exam-
ination but whose names do not ap-
pear on the list are requested to, see
Miss Beise in Barbour Gymnasium
as soon as convenient.
Choral Union Members: Pass tick-
ets for the Piatigorsky concert will
be given out to all members of the
Choral Union in good standing who
call in person at the office in the
main lobby of the School of Music
building on Monday, between the
hours of 9 and 12, and 1 and 4. After
4 o'clock no tickets will be provided.
E. E. Students, Classes of '38, '39,
'40: Those interested in part-time
employment during the second se-
mester, or in summer work, or both,
please act at once in terms of a notice
posted by Room 274, West Eng. Bldg.
University Band: All members re-
port at Hill Auditorium at 2:30 p.m.
today.
Concerts
Band Concert: The University
Band, William D. Revelli, conductor,

R.O.T.C. Unit
Drill Winners
Are Published
2nd Platoon Of Company
I Is Judged Best Drilled
In Competition
The winners in the recent regimen-
tal drill competition of the Univer-
sity R.O.T.C. were announced yester-
day by Major R. E. Hardy of the
ordinance department.
The 2nd platoon-Co. I-3rd bat-
talion was adjudged the best drilled
platoon. The best platoon leader was
2nd Lieut. C. W. Campbell, '37.
Emery, R. L., Guide, '38; 1. Brown,
R. L., '40E.; 2. Guzewicz, E. E., '40;
3. Hornaday, H. P., '40; 4. Rhodeham-
el, A., '39E; 5. Hamilton, A. E., '39;
6. Peer, W., '40; 7. Swartz, G., '40; 8.
Andrews, A., '39E.; Trumble, M.D.,
Guide, '38E.
The best rear rank was made up of:
1. Sinke, E. A., '40E.; 2. Meissner,
H. E., '40; 3. Angle, J. G., '40E; 4.
Lingenberg, E., '39w 5. Bullock, W.
F., '40E; 6. Hagans, M. V., '40; 7.
Simpson C. P., '40; 8. Currie, N. G.,
'40E.

business Office's 53 Employees
Spend Six Million Dollar Budget

When the state legislature deter-
mines how large past year's Univer-
sity budge~t shall be, the task of
spending the five or six million dol-
lars will fall into the hands of the
53 employes of the University busi-
ness office.
For the past fiscal year it has been
their job to spend $6,391,575.34 for
the operation of the University. In
the past year through their typewrit-
ers have gone orders for medicine and
bandages for the Health Service, food
and table cloths for the dormitories,
lawn mowers, boxing gloves, 90 tons
of bells, miles of paper, automobiles,
coal, cadavers, comptometers, books,
rabbits and mice, but of these mil-
lions of dollars the greatest number
go for something intangible. Sixty
per cent, or more than three million
dollars, is accounted for by one word:
instruction.
4,411 Pay Checks
This means pay checks for the 4,-
411 University employes. The College
of Literature, Science and the Arts
receives the largest share of this
money, $1,303;963.24, and the salaries
of those in this college amount to
more than $1,190,000. In accounting
for the 60 per cent given for instruc-

tion, the medical school is next with
$454,021. used for salaries. It must
be remembered, according to Herbert
G. Watkins, assistant secretary of.
the University, that some of those in
the medical school receive money
from the University Hospital budget
that is exclusive of the University
budget.
Open Through Year
The College of Engineering is next
with $459,530, of which $422,784 is
used to pay salaries. After the 60
per cent used for instruction, the
next largest portion of the budget is
the 11.2 per cent used for operation
and maintainance of the physical
plant. General expenses are next
with a 7.65 per cent cut of the six
million dollar budget.
Besides the accounting and pur-
chasing activities, the business office
is concerned with miscellaneous du-
ties such as reminding the campus of
the regulation regarding smoking in
University buildings, operating a lost
and found bureau, issuing parking
permits, and investing trust funds in
stocks, bonds and mortgages.
It stays open throughout the year,
including summer and Christmas va-
cations, Mr. Watkins said,

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
SUNDAY, JAN. 24, 193'7
VOL. XLVII No. 88
Notices
Members of the University Senate:
This is to remind you of the meet-
ing of the University Senate on Mon-
day, Jan. 25, at 4:15 p.m. in Room
C, Haven Hall.
Louis A. Hopkins, Secretary
Automobile Regulation: Permission
to drive for social purposes during
the week-end of the J-Hop from Fri-
day, Feb. 12, at noon until Monday.
Feb. 15, at 8 a.m., may be obtained at
Room 2, University Hall through the
following proceedure.
1. Parent signature cards should be
secured at this office and sent home
for the written approval of the par-
ents.
2. Upon presentation of the signed
card together with accurate infor-
mation with regard to the make, type
and license number of the car to b
used, a temporary permit will be
granted. It is especially important
to designate the year of the license
plates (1936 or 1937) which will be
on the car during the week-end 01
Feb. 12.
3. Out of town cars used for the

will give a concert complimentary to The 3rd Squad--Hq. Col.-2nd
the general public in the School of Battalion was picked as the best
Music Series this afternoon at squad. The best squad leader was
4:15 p.m. in Hill Auditorium. The Corp. J. E. Boyd, '39.
doors will be closed during numbers. * The best front and rear ranks of
squads were:
Choral Union Concert: Gregor Fronk rank: 1. Bond, F. D., '40E; 2.
Piatigorsky, violoncellist, will give the McKay, W. C., '40E; 3. Dean, H. D.,
eighth program in the Choral Union '40; 4. Boyd, J. E., '40E.
Concert Series, Monday evening, at Rear rank: 1. Adams, D. S., '40;
8:15 p.m., Hill Auditorium. 2. Basler, F. C., '40; 3. Klein, E. L.,
'40E.; 4. Weber, E.C., '39E.
Lectures Best basics: Co. "A"-Bird, W. J.,
University Lecture: Dr. Olaf Hel- '40; Co. "B"-Wyss, L. W., '40; Co.
mer, of Berlin, will lecture on "The Childs, JA.F., '40E.; Co. ""--
Logical Foundations of Mathematics" Laren, W. V., '39; Co. "F"-Bau-
in 1025 Angell Hall at 4:15 p.m., Fri-
day, Jan. 29. The public is cordially mnJ,40E.; Co. "H"-Almsdale, E.
invited. R., '40E.; Co. "I"-Guzewicz, E. A.,
'40E; Co. "K"-McCloskey, J., '4;
French Lecture: The next lecture Co. "L"-Norfleet, F. D., '40; Co.
in the French Club series will take Co"M~-Spencer, L. C., 138E.; Eq. Co.
place Wednesday, January 27, at "s"--.pennet, . ., '40E.; Hq. Co.
4:15 Room 103 Romance Languages st Bn. Bennett, W. A., '40E.; Hq. Co.
Building. Professor Warner Patter- 2nd Bn. Bennett, W. A., '40E.; Hq.
(Continued on Page 4) Co. 3rd Bn. Shaw, D. J., '40.

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1

You Can't Afford To Miss

These!

MONDAY.

BARGAIN.

SECTION

TO THE MONDAY SHOPPER everyone of these advertisements represents an out-
standing value.
TO THE READERS OF THE DAILY this value section is for you to take advantage of.
It is representative of the efforts of The Daily advertisers to place before the
public in a concentrated fashion what they have to offer in the way of outstanding
values for the MONDAY SHOPPER.
READ THIS PAGE EVERY SUNDAY
USE IT EVERY MONDAY!! M AI

o1

VERY SPECIAL!
CORDUROY
(Beautiful Quality)
PAJAMAS and ROBES
Regular $3.95
- Second Floor -
LAURA BELLE
SHOPPE
315 South State

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1704 n -4 )v
:r< cein
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Appt
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..: ti fff
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ONIGHT

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...and

every

Sunday Evening

Jefore hose Exams
SPECIALS
Kashmoor Two- and Three-Piece SUITS-
Crew, Boat, and Collar Necklines in Tans, Browns,
Greens, Rusts, and Blues.
GOOD BUYS FOR WARMTH AND WEAR!
$*9 and $*95
Values to $12.95

SPORT, STREET, and AFTERNOON DRESSES
KNITS - - CREPES - - SILKS

Values to $22.75

$ *80

the MICHIGAN UNION is
serving a $uffet Supper in the
Main Dining Room... Drop
in tonight for supper served in
the typical UNION style.

JACOBSON'S

SPECIAL

For both Men and Women

from 6 to 7:30

COLORED

SHIRT

SALE

III

11 I i I

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