100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 14, 1937 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

0

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JAN. 14, 1937

I

Dr. Bell Declares
Flu On Campus
Is NotAlarming
Number Of Cases So Far
Only Slightly Above
Last Year's Period
Declaring that the influenza epi-
demic on the camous is not aarm-
ing, Dr. Margaret Bell, acting director
of the Health Service said that the
number of students treated for colds
during the first 12 days of January
is only slightly higher than for the
same period last year.
There were 624 students treated
for acute upper respiratory infec-
tions or "colds" the first 12 days of
this month, Dr. Bell said. Twentv
of these were influenza cases, and
three had pneumonia. During the
same period last year 416 were treat-
ed for colds of which two were pneu-
monia patients, she stated.
More Than Last Year
There are 10,646 students now en-
rolled in the University, and the
number treated for colds during the
first 12 days of this month represents
only 5.9 per cent of the whole stu-
dent body, while 4.2 per cent of
the students were treated for colds
from Jan. 1 to Jan. 13, 1936.
In the University Hospital 21 stu-
dents were treated for colds during
the first 12 days of this month of
which five were influenza cases. In
January, 1936, there were 162 pa-
tients treated for colds, and in Jan-
uary, 1935, 179 were treated for colds
in the Hospital.
'HigherThan Average'
The number of patients confined
to the Hospital with influenza is
"possibly running a little higher than
average for the present time," de-
clared Dr. H. Marvin Pollard, secre-
tary of the Medical School. "I doubt
if it is much higher than the cor-
responding period for 1933 when the
number of flu patients in the Hos-
pital was slightly higher than usual,"
he said.
In January, 1933 there were 15.8
per cent of the student body treated
for colds in the Health Service, which
is the highest percentage recorded in
January for 10 years. The next
highest in the number of cases treat-
ed by the Health Service came in
January, 1931 when 1,213 cases were
diagnosed as "colds" which repre-
sented 13.2 per cent of the student
body.
Prof. Dunham
Asks Adoption
Of suggestions
State Commission Report
Gives Michigan Chanice
For IReal Progress
Prof. Arthur Dunham of the Uni-
versity Institute of Public and Social
Administration, and a member of the
state Welfare and Relief Study Cor-
mission, exhorted the Ann Arbor So-
cial Service Council Tuesday night
to use its influence in bringing about
the drafting of the recommendations
outlined in the commission's report.
Professor Dunham who is also vice-
president of the Ann Arbor Council,
stated that he believed the legislators
would be glad to know the opinions
of their constituents especially if
they are well-informed upon the sub-
ject. He urged that the means were
effective and that the cause, the
drafting of some of the "most revo-
lutionary measures in the history of
the state" was of far-reaching signi-

ficance."v
"'Thereport of the Michigan Wel-
fare and Relief Study Commission
gives Michigan the opportunity of
a generation to take her place among
the most progressive states in the
Union in the organization and ad-
ministration of social welfare ser-
vices affecting more than 300,000 per-
sons throughout the state," he said.
Much credit was given to Harold
D. Smith of Ann Arbor, executive
director of the Michigan Municipal
League, for his leadership.
In financing the public welfare ser-
vices, Professor Dunham pointed out
two recommendations which assign
certain departments to ostensibly ali-
en heads. He stated that the commis-
sion felt it was necessary in some
instances to do this in order that the
state be eligible for Social Security
funds from the federal government.
LEIDY ELECTED DIRECTOR
Prof. Paul Leidy, secretary of the
Law School, was elected to the Board
of Directors of the State Savings
Bank Tuesday
lN.

Strike Plans Are Mapped By Labor Chiefs

- Associated Press enoto
After denouncing the strike riots in Flint, Mich., in which 14 men
were shot and many more injured, Homer Martin (center), president
of the United Automobile Workers, and John Brophy (left), director
of the Committee for Industrial Organization, met in Washington for
a council of war with John L. Lewis on his campaign to organize mass
production workers into industrial unions.

Democrats Get
House Control
Of Committees'
Three Bills For Strike
Situation Presented As
Work Commences
LANSING, Jan. 13 - (/P)- The
ate legilature, its formal crganiza-
S ion completed today by appointment
f 66 standing house committees,
urned its attention to a grist of early
neasures.
The appointments place the house
n ri9id control of the Democrats.
Republicaris were given represent a-
'ion cn. most of the major commit-
ces, including nine chairmanships.
.nd were inclined to view their fall
rom power philosophically.
In a brief afternoon session, the
muse heard three. proposals for in-
iestigations of automobile strikes.
Rep. Philip J. Rahoi, Democrat, Iron
Mountain, attempted to suspend the
rules and push through a resolution
providing for a committee sift on the
strikes, but failed to obtain a two-
thirds majority necessary. His pro-
posal was referred to committee.
A second resolution he sponsored,
asking for a five-member house com-
nittee to investigate the request for
in impeachment of Judge Edward D.
'lack of Genesee county circuit court
followed the same course. Judge
Black has been attacked by the Auto-
mnobile Workers Union for his issu-
3noe of an injunction against Flint
Strikers.
Rep.sJohn F. Hamilton, Detroit,
submitted a joint resolution which
would direct the state board of can-
vassers to poll factories and learn
what percentage of the employes fa-
vor the strikes.
Supper: Sunday evening, Jan. 17,
6:30 p.m., in the ballroom of the
Michigan League. There will be an
address on The Romance of Shovel
and Trowel in Mexico," by Dr. O. D.
Foster, a noted scholar who has spent
15 years in Mexico, also a discussion
on Mexican art by Prof. Jean Paul
Slusser. Examples of Mexican art
from the collections of Miss Mina
Winslow and Miss Helen Alexander
will be on exhibition. Reservations
must be made at the Michigan
League before 10 a.m. Saturday.

Named Harvard Dean

I inure strong unions is to fight them,
Th1is Organ izer I(he believes. If General Motors wanted
a weak union, he tays. they could
Revels-Ii DC1Iem4 have had one by nego iating with the
union as soon as the strike was
Called Agitator' called.
Continued from Page 1)
sisted that women were just as easy
to sell on therunion idea and, once at the
c--nverted, w~ere more militant. He/
urged his audience earlier in the eve-NTER
ning to buy only cigarettes with the
union label, and told of his Akron FRATERNITY
womn's organization that refused toBALL
buy from any clerk not affiliated withB L
a union.
Inc was graduated from high school FLOWERS
nly because I could play basketball
and football," and doesn't have much from
respect for higher education unless
ombined with "horse sense."P u
It is a matter of great pride with lNoting
aim that he has been asked to speak Florist
on college forums, and that some of
his best friends are Cleveland, O., Phone 2-1615
high school teachers.
The surest way for industry to

4

4

- Associated Press, Photo
-James M. Landis (above), chair-
man of the federal securities ex-
change, at the age of 37 became the
youngest man ever appointed dean
of Harvard University's famed law
school. He will succeed Dean Ros-
coe Pound next September.

1I

I

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

1

I
(Continued from Page 4)

i

informally. Members of the Faculty,f
students and townspeople are cor-
dially invited to attend. Please call
303 on the University Exchange,I
Room 9, University Hall. -
J. Raleigh Nelson, Counselor to
Foreign Students.
The Eastern Religions Group will
meet in the Russian Tea Room of
the Michigan League for a cafeteria
breakfast at 9 a.m. sharp, Sunday,
Jan. 17. Dr. O. D. Foster will speak
on "Interfaith Relations." He has
recently returned from Mexico. (If
you wish come after breakfast, 9:301
a.m.) Oriental students and Ameri-
can students are invited.
Esperanto: The Esperanto class
will meet in Room 1035 Angell Hall
from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. on Friday,
Jan. 15.
Alpha Kappa Alpha, a sorority of
Negro women, invites all those in-
terested to attend its annual Found-
er's Day and Vocational Guidance
program on Friday night, Jan. 15, 8
p.m. at Lane Hall. Speakers have
been chosen from students here
working on higher degrees.
Annual Job Conference, E. E. De-1
partment: Monday evening, Jan. 18,
Room 248, at 7:30 p.m. Students from

outside the department will be wel-
comed.
All Men Students and Faculty are
invited to attend the Union Coffee
Hour, to be held every afternoon
from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. in the small
ballroom of the Union, commencing
Monday, Jan. 18.
First Congregational Church: The
Student Fellowship will hold its first
party of the new year Friday at 9
p.m. There will be dancing and a very
interesting surprise during an inter-
mission. All Congregational students'
and their friends are cordially invited.
Athena: The Athena Ensian pic-
ture will be taken Sunday, Jan. 17.
Every member must be present at
Dey's studio at 2 p.m.
U. of M. Public Health Club: A
party will be held Saturday, Jan. 16.
at 9 p.m. at the Women's Athletic
Bldg. Bowling, dancing and games.
Those having membership cards
please bring them for free admission.
All students pursuing courses in pub-
lic health and hygiene are cordially
invited to attend.
A.A.U.W. meeting, Mich. League,
Saturday, Jan. 16, at 3 p.m. Miss
Edith Thomas of University Library
staff will speak on "Newest Books,"
giving running comments on some of
the newest publications in biography,
travel, and fiction. There will follow
an informal social hour with knitting
and tea.
A.A.U.W. International Relations

Block On State St.
Purchased By Trick
The sale of the business block on
the northeast corner of S. State St.
and N. University Ave. by the Federal
Deposit Insurance Corporation to S.
W. Trick of the Hilledene manor was
announced yesterday.
The property, which has a frontage
of 45 feet on State St. and 113 on N.
University Ave., includes the build-
ings occupied by the Quarry Drug Co.
and the Laura Belle shop on State
St., and the building which formerly
contained the Ann Arbor Savings
bank branch, the store shared by the
Kyer Laundry and Swiss dry cleaning
firms and the store occupied by the
Moe Barber shop on the University
Ave. side.
U") DANCING
Class & individual in-
struction in all types
of dancing. Teachers
course. Phone 9695
Terrace Garden Studio
Second Floor
Wuerth Theatre Bldg.

WEEK-END
Drug Specials

$1.10 Louis Phillipe Lipstick .
50c Wood bury's Creams . . .
$1.00 Pacquin's Hand Cream .
35c Pond's Creams . . . .
60c Mum . . . . . . .
60c Amoin . . . . . . . . . .

. .79c
. . 33c
S. 79c
. . 25c
. .4 3c
. .47c

I

MILLER DRUG STORE

727 North University

Phone 9797

4

B

6:

0

p

r

FIRST TIME in
ANN ARBOR-

High

Grade

LAST CALL FOR
TRY TS
FOR MICHIGAN NIGHT

*

enuine---
yTHE EVENT YOU HAVE BEEN WAITING FOR
":ii EGINNING TIDAY
HUNDREDS OF PALACE CARPETS, SILK RUGS,
HALL RUGS and SCATTER RUGS
A SemiAtue and Modern

on Pontiacs
AtA hA

I

nI
\II

BIG COAST-TO-COAST BROADCAST-JAN. 22

PERSIAN

RUGS and CARPETS

formerly belonging to Agha Babian of Sultanabad, Persia

IF

you believe that you have an act of
national network calibre-humorous,
musical, dramatic, or what have you-

IF

you would like to get a radio audition over
a nationwide hookup with a guaranteed
audience of millions of people-

Co hfthe
SeiL
irs Als4unres c
tstons, havebee
. e 5 ii .45ter fsg s 5i
it- er gro nde p to ru
s o try argt.
Also hundreds o
tu"s, have een

* KCERMANS
" BAKTIYAR
* HERIZ
" KASHAN
" SAROUKS
" TABRIZ
" SARAFAN D

* BIJARS
* BUKARAHS
* ANTIQUE AGR A
* KORASA NS
* SARAPYS
* LILLAHANS
* CHINESE

III

ii

You can relax and really
enojy the delightful
ZOTOS
PROCESS
MACHINELESS PERMANENTS
$5.00 - $10.00
OTHER PERMANENTS

IF

you want to help make Michigan Night
a real display of Michigan's finest
talent and an outstanding success-

and many other rare types in all sizes from door mats to magnifi-
cent specimens 25 feet long.
f fine rugs from the Caucasus which, due to government restric-
" out of the market for years ...including

SEE MR. MILLER at
anAn a lau. -

Cabistans, Bokharas, Kkivas, Shirrans, etc.

'I

1

II

T L J I D r1 C i t"1 t"% D

I

I

-

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan