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January 14, 1937 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-01-14

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THURSDAY, JAN. 14, 1937

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TH n

THURSDAY, JAN. 14, 1937 PAGE TlIRH1~

Puck Jinx May

Keep Jonny Fabello

From

Minnesota

Tilt

Flu Threatens
Hard Skating
Varsity Star
Lowrey's Weakened Crew
Prepares For Important
Gopher Ice.Series
Merrill To First Line
By BONTH WILLIAMS
The grim jinx that insists on pur-
suing Michigan's scrapping hockey
team from year to year struck yester-
day for the second time this season
when Johnny Fabello, hard skating
right winger on the first line was
confined to the Health Service with
a severe cold.
Whether or not the flashy junior
will be able to take the ice in the
Coliseum Friday night when the Wol-
verines face the rampant Minnesota
Gophers in the first of a two-game
series is still problematical.
Merrill Moves Up
Jack Merrill took E'abello's place
on the first line in the final practice
session of the week last night and in-
dications are that he will continue
there if Fabello is not in shape to
play. Coach Eddie Lowrey, thinking
no doubt of that great series with the
Gophers here last season when his
little seven-man squad outbattled
three Minnesota forward lines for an
overtime victory in the first game
only to be beaten by a galaxy of sub-
stitutes the following evening, voiced
his own hope and that of the team
when he intimated that there was a
good chance Fabello might be able
to play at least a part of the all-im-
portant series.
Should Fabello be kept out of both
games, Michigan will face the invad-
ing Norsemen with but eight men.
One of these, Ed Chase, is a com-
paratively unseasoned campaigner.
Dick Berryman, senior winger, has
been forced to quit the squad due to
scholastic complications.
Gophers Undefeated
In utter contrast, Minnesota brings
a seasoned band of 15 performers to
battle it out with the Wolverines. Un-
defeated in 5 games, the Gophers
under the tutealage of Coach Larry
Armstrong, have scored 18 times
while their capable net minder, Bud
Wilkinson, who incidentally was the
smartest quarterback in the Western
Conference this season, has held the
opposition to five goals.
The Gophers boast a triumph over
Carleton College and two wins each
over Dartmouth and a semi-pro club
called the Alaska Polar Bears.
Of the 15 men whom Armstrong
plans to bring here for the Michigan
series, all but three learned their
hockey in one of the fast stepping
high school leagues which are prom-
inent in the Twin Cities.
Carlson High Scorer
The leading Gopher scorer at pres-
ent is Jimmy Carlson, second line
center, who leads the parade with
three goals and four assists. Wally
Taft is in second place with four
goals and one assist, and Ed Arnold,
diminutive but veteran flanker, who
has tallied three times and has been
credited with one assist, is third.
Coach Lowrey plans to rest his lit-
tle squad tonight in preparation for
the tough two-game series Friday
and Saturday. The Wolverines have
looked good in practice all week and
will turn in a great performance
against Minnesota. If Fabello is kept
out of the series however, it will mean
that Michigan's first line, plus George
Cooke and possibly Ed Chase, must
match the pace of three shifts of
Gophers for 60 heartbreaking min-
utes. The Wolverines are in a tough
spot.

GOLF COMES HIGH
The world's three million golfers
annually spend upwards of fifty-four
million dollars in the direct pursuit
of their beloved pasture billiards.'

'The PRESS ANGLE
-By GEORGE J. ANDROS -
We're Forced To Laugh ...
A THOUSAND PARDONS while we laugh at the Michigan Amateur Ath-
letic Union . . . Yesterday we learned that the fourth annual A.A.U.
Relays had been cancelled because this auspicious body lacked the 500
smackers necessary to finance the meet . . . Even though realizing fully
that what the A.A.U. does with its funds is quite definitely none of my
business, I am forced to utter something more than a snicker at this estimate
of the meet's expense . . . Yost Field House would be donated for the
evening, except for lighting and heating expense which certainly wouldn't
amount to much . . . Awards to winners of separate events have not been of
high quality in previous meets . . . Other expenses are minor . . . The net
profit from the gate receipts last year was $204 and yet the A.A.U. claims
it can't finance the meet . . . I'm wondering just what the A.A.U. can do?
Santa Clara, the Pacific Coast college whose football team last fall
lost only one game and finished the season by beating powerful Louisiana
State New Year's Day, has an enrollment of only 475 . . . Ray Goodman,
Daily basketball expert, was correct on six out of his nine Conference predic-
tions last week end ... Monday night he hit four out of five . .. Merle "Butch"
Kremer, Michigan outfielder who hit better than .350 last season, still
aspires to be a pitcher . . . He is a southpaw and claims that a sore arm
kept him from making good on the mound last year . . . Bill Yearnd, soph-
omore golfer, gets greater distance on his drives than any Michigan man
since golf became a Varsity sport, including both Johnny Fischer and Chuck
Kocsis.
* * * *
But What Of It?.-.
ARNOLD DANIELS, stooge on the editorial staff of The Daily, has devised
a table of difficulty of Big Ten basketball schedules . . . You can take it
for what it's worth . . . He has rated the playing ability of the various teams
as follows: 5-Purdue; 4-Michigan, Indiana and Iowa; 3-Northwestern and
Illinois; 2-Wisconsin and Ohio State; 1-Chicago and Minnesota .,. . He then,
totalled the ratings of the three teams which a team does not play, divided
that total into the rating of the team, and emerged with the difficulty of
the schedule as it appears in relation to the playing ability of the team ...
By this method Purdue, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Illinois, Northwestern,
Wisconsin, Ohio State, Chicago and Minnesota have schedules varying in
difficulty in that order with Purdue's the toughest ... It may also be inter-
preted as showing hdw the teams will stand up against their schedules and
thus how they will finish.
We should have stated yesterday that Matt Mann does not need another,
assistant . . . Charles McCaffree, Varsity swimmer in 1928, '29 and '30, helps
Matt with his national champions . . . He has an enviable coaching recordI
of his own, having turned out six championship teams in six years at Battle
Creek high school between his graduation and his return to Michigan asj
assistant, coach . . . Jewell Young, Purdue forward, has made 13 out of
14 free throws in three Conference games this season ... Johnny Townsend
is twelfth in the Big Ten scoring race but 10 of the 11 ahead of him havej
played in one more game than John . . . A survey of six of the country's
leading race tracks shows that the favorites finish first only a third of the
time . . . Dark horses win 47 % of the races so we advise playing the long
shots ... But which ones? -De Lano.

Keen Chooses
Nine Matmen
To Make Trip'
Nine Varsity wrestlers will embark
this afternoon at 3:45 p.m. for an in-
vasion of'the East where they will
meet Lehigh Universty at Bethlehem,
Pa., tomorrow and Franklin and Mar-
shall University at Lancaster, Pa., on
Saturday.
Coach Cliff Keen has selected the
following men to make the trip: John!
Speicher, 118-pounds; Paul Cameron'.
and Ed Kellman, 126-pounds; EarlI
Thomas, 135-pounds; Louis Mascur-I
uskus, 145-pounds; Captain Frank I
Bissell, 155-pounds; Frank Morgan,
165-pounds; Harland Danner, 175-
pounds; and Forrest Jordan, heavy-
weight.
Thomas' knee is apparently suffi-
ciently recovered for him to wrestle
against the powerful Lehigh aggre-
gation, and the other injured grap-
plers are all expected to see action.
The condition of these men may well
determine the outcome of the two
meets, for both Lehigh and Franklin
and Marshall rate among the best
of the college teams in the country.
Keen stated that both meets were
toss-ups as far as he could see, with
breaks and condition determining the
final outcome. Capacity crowds of
well over 1,500 are expected to watch
the matches, with top price for seatz,
being $1.50.
Golden Gloves
Officials Raise
Price Of Finals
The committee in charge of Ann
Arbor's fourth annual Golden Gloves
tournament has found it necessary
to raise the prices of seats for the
finals on Feb. 3 to one dollar for
ringside seats and 75 cents general
admission, since the seating capacity
of the local Armory has been reduced
from 1,200 to 1,000.
Admission prices for all other
nights but the finals will be kept
the same at 50 and 75 cents. The
committee feels that fight fans should
not object to paying a little more for
the championship battles since they
are always the best and since the
Golden Gloves prices in other cities
are in general much higher than
those in effect here.
It is estimated that with full houses
on all three nights, the profits would
just about equal those of last year's
tournaments which cleared $300.
Students may purchase tickets at
Moe's Sport Shops on North Uni-
versity and State Street and at the
Michigan Union. They can be re-
served by calling 3419 at any time.

Yawkey Hears 'Wolverine Cagers Depend On
Cronin's Plan Next Three To Polish Offense

To Aid Boston !"

By RAY GOODMAN

With two games of the first half of
Manager Could Use Either the Big Ten schedule behind them.
the Michigan cagers began practice in
Vosinik Or Solters, Who earnest yesterday in preparation for
Are Not For Sale their ramblings this week-end and
Ohio State's btsketball ten days
away.
NEW YORK, Jan. 13.-(UP)-Tom Because this year's Conference is
Yawkey, who has $3,600,000 invested probably tougher than it has been
in the sixth place Boston Red Sox, in a decade with seven definitely first
listened today to Manager Joe Cron- rate teams, there is no such thing
i a,;nreally easg schedcule. Therefore

in's plans for making the investment
good.
Joe recommended two players, two
lineup changes, and lots of patience,
and Yawkey, the happiest sixth place
club owner in business, agreed to!
everything.
Joe wants either Julius Solters of
the Browns or Joe Vosmik of the
Indians. He also wants to change
Pinky Higgins from third to second
base and make room for a couple of
youngsters in the outfield, but, as
Yawkey pointed out, Solters and Vo-
smik are not for sale.
1 Is Strong For Cronin
Yawkey took time out to squelch
rumors that he has sold out on Cron-
in.
"I think the purchase of Cronin is
the best deal I've made and I'd make
the deal again tomorrow at twice the
figure!" he said.
He was asked if he meant he'd pay
$500,000 for Cronin.
"Sure," he replied, "he's one of the
greatest guys I ever saw."
Nothing could down Yawkey's en-
thusiasm. Billy Evans, manager of
the club's minor league affairs, came
into the meeting and reported that
the $50,000 spent by Yawkey in the
minors last season won't produce a
single player for the Red Sox this
year and probably not one next.
Evans did say, though, that year
after next they might get "two or
three prospects." Yawkey was*pleased
about that.

{~ ab u tchy Druy bulluuiu. 'Thulufel
it has come to the point where the
order of the games is an important
factor in the final outcome of the
campaign.
For Michigan the order of games
is an aid as well as a detriment.
Varsity Meets Badgers
Saturday night Coach Cappy Cap-
pon takes his squad to Madison, Wis.
to meet the Badgers, a second divi-
sion team that has yet to win -a de-
cision in three tries, although it did
come close to the erratic Illini. Mon-
day the Varsity takes on Chicago who
also has not won a Big Ten game,
but whom some observers seem to be-
lieve have a game of basketball in
them that will show up one of these
days to extreme embarrassment of
some unsuspecting first division five.
Because of the trouble that Cap-
pon has been having in shaking off
the anti-Townsend defense that he
is running into in Big Ten circles this
let-up comes as a distinct relief. Both
of the week-end's opponents will use
this defense which works like a mob
scene with Jake Townsend the vic-
tim at pivot.
Wolverines Fail To Click
The Wolverines know how to work
when this mobbing occurs but so far
have been unable to get going. The
games with Maroons and the Badgers
should give them a chance to smooth
out their new offense to counter-
balance the effects of this imitative
attitude of the Big Ten coaches.
Ohio State, of course, won't be any
team to practice on but by that time
KODAKS

the Wolverines should be ready for
any tactics.
The second semester Michigan
really runs the gauntlet, meeting
Indiana, Northwestern. Purdue, Ohio
State, and Indiana in that order
within a two and a half week period.
This is point at which most Varsity
basketball teams hit their peak so the,
schedule may be considered in a
better light from this angle than it
seems upon first consideration.
Cappon's job for the next week or
so will be to fight off over-confidence
which made such a difference last
year then a seemingly weak Minne-
sota team upset the Wolverines. Both
Wsconsin and Chicago have the abil-
ity to play a winning ball game and
a good case of over-confidence would
give them the opportunity that they
are looking for and at the same time
put Michigan out of the race.
Lee Ramage Scheduled
To Fight John H. Lewis
LOS ANGELES, Jan. 13.-(P)-One
year after starting a comeback, Lee
Ramage, young San Diego heavy-
weight, received an offer today to
fight John Henry Lewis in New York's
Madison Square Garden next month.
"Pop" Foster, veteran manager
who took over Ramage last January,
said Jimmy Johnston of the Garden
made the offer.

MI LTONS
SHOP FOR MEN
ODD
TROUSERS
(r

2 DR UGS.

Vines Leaves Hospital
To Rejoin Net Troupe
Ellsworth Vines, world's No. 1 pro-
fessional tennis player, will leave the
hospital in Chicago today where he
has been "taking a rest" and fly to
Pittsburgh for his scheduled match
tomorrow night with Fred Perry, for-
mer world's amateur net champion.
Vines, who has been able to win butj
one set out of the ten that he has'
played with Perry in their presentI
barnstorming tour, is expected to be
in good shape for Friday's match.
The lanky Californian will come to
Detroit Saturday for his scheduled
encounter with Perry at Olympia.
The Detroit engagement-was orig-
inally planned for last Tuesday but
Vines' illness forced a postponement
Despite his poor showing in th6
first three meets, 'Ellie' is still the
best tennis player in the world to the
greater number of American fans
and if the Californian is fully re-
covered, the betting odds will prob-
ably be on him.

Finances Lacking,
RelaysCancelled
It was announced yesterday by
Lloyd W. Olds, chairman of the Mich-
igan A.A.U. track and field commit-
tee, that the fourth annual Michigan
Relays, originally scheduled for Feb-
ruary 16, have been cancelled be-
cause of a lack of funds.
The Relays were to have been
staged in Yost Field House and would
have been marked by the first ap-
pearance in competition of the 1937
Wolverine track team. It is believed
that the A.A.U. will be able to renew
the meet next year but the $500 said
to be necessary to stage the meet this
year is not availaple.
The first local meet of the indoor
season thus becomes the dual affair
between Michigan a n d Michigan
State, Feb. 20, which the Wolverines
will be top-heavy favorites to win.
The A.A.U. Relays have grown in
popularity each year since they were
first held

Snapshots at night
withanycame a\
with ny camCer

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