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January 12, 1937 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-01-12

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TUESDAY. JAN. 12, 1937

'1" 1-1 E Al ICAJIGAN DAILY

PAVE THREE

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MichiganRallies In Final Minutes

To Down

Wildcats, 34-31

Bill Barclay's.
Follow-In Shot
Clinches Game
Purple's Attempt To Stop
Jake Townsend's Passes
Proves Boomerang
Is First Big Ten Win
(Continued from Page 1)
'in the first half the Wildcats hit ap-
proximately 48 per cent of their
long shots for five baskets out of
the seven that they made In the
second half they cooled off, but still
hit enough to pull ahead to what
seemed to be a winning margin. Al-
together the Purple team made but
four shots in the whole game.
Speed Injected
Michigan, on the other hand, was
playing with the top on the basket.
Time and again its long shots re-
fused to drop. But the Wolverines
hit enough of their shots to draw in
the Northwestern defense and open
up Townsend and the backboard.
But it was the sudden injection
of speed into the Varsity offense
that won the ball game. The over-
cautious, sloppy ball that has marked
Michigan's play faded away when the
situation got serious and the Wol-
verines started covering loose balls,
passing sharply, and playing with a
pnch that couldn't be stopped.
Lonborg started Guy Mercer and
Hi Bender, substitute guards, in place
of his regulars, Bob Voigts and Duke
Vance, in hopes that they could give
his squad enough speed to ruri the
big Michigan team into the ground.
But the Wolverines, in top physical
condition, could not be run into the
ground and the strategy proved a
complete failure.
Battle See-Saws
Fred Trenkle opened the scoring
with a basket from the foul circle but
Townsend tossed an assist to Pata-
nelli to even up the score Then
Gee hit a follow-in and McMichaels
made his first basket to tie it up and
hit a free throw to put Northwestern
ahead. Barclay and Trenkle traded
shots and Herm Fishman made two
points from far out on the floor.
Then Bender tied up the score at
8-8 with a foul shot and McMichaels
put the Wildcats back in the lead. At
this point Northwestern began to foul
Townsend, who collected five free
throws in the first half, and the lead
continued to change with the Evan-
ston team ahead, 20 to 16, at the
half.
The lead changed eight times ir
the first period and the score was
tied six times.
Object To Referees
Jake again sunk a hook shot tc
put Northwestern ahead six points at
the opening of the second half.
Townsend assisted Fishman as he
went under and then picked up a
free throw. McMichaels hit anothe
long, Trenkle got loose and weni
under the basket alone and Gene
Smith made a foul shot that was the
result of Gee's fourth personal.
Meanwhile Barclay and Townsend
had each hit another free throw an
Gee had made a long shot to make
the score 30 to 23 for Northwesterr
when the Michigan team suddenl3
got going and fought its way to its
seventh victory of the season
The Varsity made 10 out of 14 fre
throws, while the Wildcats hit nin
out of 12.
The crowd was dissatisfied with the
refereeing job turned in by Nicl
Kearns of DePaul, who had a har

,I

The PRESS ANGLE
By GEORGE J. ANDROS
Another Suicide Schedule
MICHIGAN STATE, Northwestern and Minnesota will be Michigan's first
three grid opponents next fall . . The only intersectional clash will be
with Pennsylvania,. again at Philadelphia, and we understand that the
Quakers may also be added to the 1939 and 1940 schedules ... Ross Faulkner,
sophomore from Montclair, N. J., was never out for track until he came
to Michigan . . . Now lie is considered one of the leading quarter milersj
on the Wolverine cinder squad and with a little experience should be a sure
point winner . . . Johnny Smithers, Varsity halfback, is back in the hos-
pital because of the same leg ailment that kept him out of the final with
Ohio State last fall.
In 1912 Michigan was leading the Pennsylvania football team, .21-
20, with three seconds left to play ... Michigan punted and the final
whistle blew while the ball was in the air but, according to the rules,
play must continue until the ball is downed . . . Marshall, Penn
safetyman, caught the ball and ran to a touchdown, the Quakers,
winning, 27-21, after a successful attempt for the extra point . .
t
Now that young Bob Feller has signed his 1937 contract the ball yard
scribes will turn their attention to holdout Luke Appling of the Chicago
White Sox . . . Appling is the American League batting champion and J.
Louis Comiskey will be forced to offer a highly substantial sum before
getting his star short stop into the fold.
Benny, The Greatest
BENNY OOSTERBAAN is considered by Fielding H. Yost to be the
greatest natural athlete he has ever seen . . . Benny was one of
Michigan's few nine-letter men ... There is an interesting story about
Ben and the 1926 Ohio State grid battle . . . At the end of the first
quarter the Buckeyes were leading, 10-0, and the Wolverines had not
even threatened as yet ."..Watly Weber, present backfield coach but
Varsity fullback at that time, was trying to pep up the Michigan eleven
... At the conclusion of Weber's oratory Oosterbaan said, "Hell, Wally,
why worry? We haven't had the ball yet." .. . Michigan won the game,
17-16 ...
From 1901 to 1905 inclusive Michigan won 55 football games, lost one and
tied one . . . When the 1937 United States Davis Cup team is picked there
will be tremendous repercussions if "Bitsy" Grant is again omitted .:. The
Atlanta midget, with his characteristic love of pulling the unexpected, Sat-
urday bowled over Don Budge, America's No. 1 amateur, in straight sets and
thus added another scalp to his long list of upset victims . . . Notre Dame
made 145 substitutions while beating the Navy, 26-2, in 1930 . . . To me the
proposed boycott of the Jim Braddock-Max Schmeling heavyweight title
bout next June is ridiculous . . . Politics should be kept out of the athletic

Illinois Turns
Back Indiana
Quintet, 4a-31
Purdue Beats Iowa, 35-31,
To Keep Conference
L .ea d BckevesIn

Townsends Lacking, Gopher Sextet Features Goalie
But Frosh Cagers Wilkinson And Veteran Offense
Reveal Ample Skills_______

Despite the fact that the freshman
basketball squad boasts no Townsend
and still needs to be worked on, Coach
Ray Fisher believes that the squad
this year can easily compare with the

average of the last few years and out-
CHAMPAIGN, Ill.. Jan. 11.-k P)- class many of them.
Illinois handed Indiana its first de-' With nearly two months of solid
feat of the Big Ten basketball sea- practice behind them, the frosh ag-
sor before 7,000 fans tonight, turning gregation is developing into a smooth
back the highly rated Hoosiers, 40 to working, fast, shifty, ball team. The
31, with a fast-breaking offense and several offensive plays that were first
a defense that tightened up to choke handed out have been augmented by
off a last-minute rush by the in- more and by several defensive tactics
vaders. besides.
With Lou Boudreau sinking three Ray Stands Out
field goals and Henry Combes play- Working around tall Jimmy Ray as
ing just as effectively, Illinois sbuilt a pivot man, the fast breaking for-
up an 18 to 7 lead at the half. The wards have been going hot in practice
Hoosiers, who won their first two against the second team. Ray plays
Conference starts from Iowa and his position with a rhythm not us-
Chicago, missed numerous short his pon st arytm nt n
shots by inches. ually found so early in first-year men,
The Illini continued to dominate Charley Pink, who stands consid-
play during the first 15 minutes of erably less than six feet, makes up
the second half, building their mar- for his lack of height by his brilliant
gin up to 34 to 15. Then Platt, basket-shooting and speedy floor play
a sub guard, sank three field goals works well with Ray, taking hi
in a row, and Etnire and Gunning passes for many close-in shots.
immediately followed with five more Herb Brogan, although a little
field goals between them. At this wanting on his follow-up of shots
point the Illini defense, led by Riegel, and pivot passes, is responsible for
lanky center, braced to halt the Hoo- many baskets made from beyond the
sier charge. foul circle.
Freddie Trosko, who played with
PURDUE TRIPS IOWA the Michigan state championship
IOWA CITY, Jan. 11.-(A)-Pur- high school team two years ago, i
due's nifty ball handling and free- proving a real ball hawk and does a
throw shooting gave the Boilermak- great deal of the work in bringing
ers a 35 to 31 victory over the Iowa the ball down the floor.
basketball team tonight as the win- Height Available
ners remained undefeated in the Bob Palmer's easy ball handling
Western Conference race. and his quick breaks add to the well-
; -_oiled appearance of the team. Russ

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By GLEN PHELPS i first attacking line are Ed Arnold
Coach Larry Armstrong will lead and Ridge Baker. Another trio of
his Gopher hockey champions into veterans makes up the second line,
Ann Arbor on Friday of this week, and reads from left to right, Joe
for the local end of a four-game Schwab, Jimmy Carlson and Wally
home and home series that annually Taft.
features all that is goodand a lot The newest pride of Minneapolis
that isn't called for in the way of is the so-called 'pony line', com-
real hockey. posed of Loarne Randell, Ken An-
To date this winter, the choice derson fand Ray .Wallace-first-year
morsel in the Minnesota 'shinny' dish men all, but duly tried and proven.
is a double victory over Dartmouth's In fact Coach Armstrong states that
Eastern Champion Indians. In this Wallace is the man behind the
series, the men of Armstrong were "hardest shot in amateur hockey!"
far and away the better, and in par- Trouble At befense
ticular, the grid quarterback, and On the line of defense, however,
incumbent goal keeper, Bud Wilkin- the Gophers plead. trouble. Most
son, was a whole powerhouse in him- severe of the losses has been that of
self. The Indians were able to 'get Bill Loomis, a promising sophomore,
to' Bud only once during the 120 who was rerioved from competition
minutes of play. by ineligibility. Johnny Ganley, Bill
Ten Veterans Present Bredensen and Dick Kroll, a 185-
But Wilkinson's goal sweeping isn't pound sophomore round out the de-
the Gophers only claim to strength. fensive brigade.
When they arm for battle, 14 men The Gophers became champions of
appear on the official roster. Of the Big Ten last winter when they
these 14, 10 are experienced cam- took three games out of a possible
paigners in Big Ten circles. four from Coach Eddie Lowrey's ther
At thehelm is the veteran center reigning champion Wolverines.
Capt. Ray Bjorck. Completing this

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HOME-TOWN CLUB
The Chicago White Sox have more
home boys on their roster than any
other American League club, six al-
together, Pitcher John Rigney,
Catchers Skoronski and Kenneth Sil-
vestri, First Baseman Frank Houska
and Second Baseman Tony Piet, in

Clearance!
Entire Stock of Finely--
Tailored Ready-for-wear
Ove rcoa ts

addition to Coach

Billy Webb.

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Athletie Board
'Studies' Grid
Coaching Setup
(Continued from Page 1)
earning with $4,285; but after ex-
penses were paid the cagers were
about $6,500 in the red. Tennis
showed the smallest loss of all sports
despite the fact that the sport had
no income. Track proved to be the
worst money-making sport of the
University, showing no earnings and
expenses of $10,500. Items included
in the disbursement side of the bal-
ance showed $148 for cheerleading
and $360 for Olympic tryouts. The
receipts side showed an income of
$4,000 for radio broadcasting rights
and $1,245 for stadium concession.
Patton Lauded
The profits for the year were not
large enough to enable the Board to
retire any of the stadium bonds, but
$10,000 was paid toward the liquida-
tion of bank loans and $6,100 went
into plant additions.
The outlook for the next year ap-
peared bright, as the report stated
that "since the income of the Board
outside of football and its expendi-
tures generally are fairly consistent,
it is to be expected that the financial
report for the year 1936-37 will show
a considerable increase in opera-
tion profit."
The report lauded Harvey Patton,
winner of the Conference Medal for
all-around excellence and scholar-
ship in athletics. It said, "The dimu-
nitive Mr. Patton made a remarkable
record in his favorite event, the 440-
yard dash. His record in scholarshipj
is one to cause pride."
Del Prete's
GREATEST
MICHAELS STERN
Suits
Overcoats
TOPCOATS, averaging
331/3% Off
$30 SUITS $21.75
$35 SUITS $25.75
$40 SUITS $27.75
$45 SUITS $29.75
TUXEDOES $25.00
TAILS $30.00
OVERCOATS $21.75.to $37.60
TOPCOATS. $21.75 to $28.00
20% OFF on

Diz Has A New Version
Of Old 'St. Louis Blues'

CHICAGO, Jan. 11.-(P)-Dizzy
Dean dusted off his boss-baiting actv
again today.
"OP Diz" in Chicago tohwork on
one of his sidelines, said he wouldv
welcome being traded off by the Car-
dinals who haven't done right by "mev
or the St. Louis fans" and that he °
figured his services worth more than
Babe Ruth ever got from the NewV
York Yankees.
"If the Cardinals did the right
thing by me," he said without the
trace of a smile, "they'd pay me more
than Babe Ruth got. Then the fans
could brag St. Louis had the highest-
priced ball player in history.
"I'll make this proposition," he
said, still wearing a straight face.
"They give me a contract for $50,000
and I'll guarantee to win 25 games.
If I don't win 25, I'll work for noth-
ing."
POSTPONE MATCH
The Vines-Perry professional ten-
nis show has postponed its scheduled.
performance in Detroit tonight due1
to the illness of Ellsworth Vines, whot
is confined in a Chicago hospital withT
influenza. I
Fred Perry, the Briton who' recent-I
ly succumbed to the lucrative offersZ
of tennis promoters and forsook am-
ateur ranks, had beaten Vines, hith-
erto tops in the pro game, in three'
matches on their present tour, which
included contests at New York, Cleve-
land and Chicago.
BOMBER BOMBS AGAIN
BUFFALO, N. Y., Jan. 11.--(,P-
Joe Louis of Detroitknocked out
Stanley Ketchell of Bloomfield, N. J.,
in the second round of a scheduled'
four-round fight tonight.

Iowa connected with 15 gift tosses',
but couldn't match the ball hand-
lers of last years co-champions. Pur-
due shot 17.
Paul Malaska, Purdue's junior
guard, kept the home team on the
short end throughout the contest,
whipping in four baskets and 2 free
throws to tie for scoring honors with
Iowa's Wally Gaddis, and two of his
teammates.
GOPHERS TOP MAROONS
MINNEAPOLIS, Jan. 11.-(P)-
iVinnesota opened its Western Con-
ference basketball season tonight
with a 30 to 23 victory over Chicago.
After the first minute of play, in
which Chicago scored on a free throw,
Minnesota stepped ahead for an ad-
vantage that was retained through-
out.
The speed of Gordon Addington,
which made him high-scorer with a
total of 12 points, saved the game for
Minnesota.
The loss was the second in as many
Conference games for Chicago.
BUCKEYES WIN OPENER
COLUMBUS, O., Jan. 11.-(P)-
Ohio State University launched its
Western Conference basketball cam-
paign tonight with a 28 to 22 victory
over Wisconsin
The defeat was the third straight
in Big Teri competition for Wisconsin
which previously had lost to Purdue
and Illinois.

Dobson, another tall boy, takes over
the duties of Ray on occasions and
shows up to advantage under the bas-
ket.
Horace Adams, the tallest man on
the squad, standing around six-four
or five, has shown remarkable im-
provement since the opening of prac-
tice but still lacks polish. Joe Savilla,
frosh football star and another giant.
also is displaying a great deal of ad-
vancement in his performance but is
a trifle slow in comparison with the
smaller members of the team.

THE JOHN MARSHALL
,LAWCOURSES
(40 weeks per year)
SC H OO L Afternoon-3years
SC~~ HL days... 4:30-.:30
FOUNDED 1899 Evening - 4 years
Mon. Wed., Fri.,
AN 630-920
ACCREDITED Post-graduate
LAW SCHOOL lyear..twiceaweek
Practice courses
TEXT and CASE exclusively.
METHOD All courses lead
# to degrees.
For Catalog, recom-. Two years' college
mended list of pre-legal work required for
subjects, and booklet, entrance.
"StudyofLawandProper New classes form
Preparation"'address: in Feb.and Sept.
Edward T. Lee, Dean.
315 Plymouth Ct., Chicago, Ill.
READ THE WANT ADS

Formerly
Formerly
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Formerly
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45.00
40.00
37.50
35.00
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$27.50 and $25.00 NOW

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$37.50
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Come in. It will be a pleasure
to show you our merchandise.
THE DOWNTOWN STORE
FOR MICHIGAN MEN
$t!b9 &rT MAI Nb
309 SOUTH MAIN

I'

BIG TEN STANDINGS

Purdue ..........
Ohio State .......
Minnesota .......
Indiana ..........
Illinois ...........
Michigan........
Chicago ...........
Northwestern ... .
Iowa ...........
Wisconsin......

W L
. .3 0
,.1 0Q
. .1 0
. .2 1
. .2 1
..1 1
. .Q 2
. .1 2
. .1 2
. .Q 3

Pet.
1.000
1.000
1.000
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Attention:
FRATERNITIES, SORORITIES,
STUDENT ORGAN IZATONS -

$27.50
$23.50
$19.50

33.50
30.00
28.50
27.50
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Story Book Finish

Michigan (34)
Townsend, f .......
Barclay, f........
Gee, c .............
Fishman, g ........
Patanelli, g ........
Smick, f...........
Lane, c ............
Thomas, g .........

.

fg ft
..3 7
..2 2
..2 1
..1 0
..2 0
..2 0
..0 0
..0 0

a
2
0
1
1
0
0
0
0

Totals..
Northwestern

(31)

Trenkle, f........
McMichael, f.....
Smith, c..,........
Mercer, g..........
Bender, g..........
Blume, f ..........
Nagode, c.........
Vance, g...........
Voigts, g ...........
Totals.........

.12 10 4
fg ft a
..3 0 0
..3 3 0
..3 2 0
..1 0 0
..0 20
..0 00
..0 20
.0 0 0

pf t
2 13
1 6
4 5
2 2
2 4
1 4
0 0
0 0
12 34
pf t
1 6-
0 9
3 8
3 2
1 2
0 0
0 2
1 2
1 0

For 'ROYALS' See
S302 5.
RI DER'S State
TYPEWRITERS

Your group picture

and

11

may desire to appear on your page in the 1937 Mich-

&iii

any

additional

Shoe Sale

iganensian must be taken before
Avoid delay and arrange today with

JANUARY

24th.

pictures

you

Messrs.

Spedding,

11 9 01031

Officials: Nick Kearns (DePaul)
and John Schommer (Chicagol.
Score at half: Northwestern 20,
Michigan 16.
Free Throws Missed: Michigan 5
(Townsend 2, Barclay, Gee 2);
Northwestern 3 (McMichael 2, Na-
gode).

NUNN-BUSH SHOES

$10.00 Values

$

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Rentschler or Dey for your sittings.
The 1937
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$ 8.00 Values . .

I-M BASKETBALL SCORES
Kappa Nu (A) 9.
Sigma Phi (A) 17.

OTHER MAKES at $4.95

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