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January 06, 1937 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-01-06

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U

The Weather
Generally fair and continued
cold.

LI e

AJPV A6F
t

4:3att

Editorials
Problems Before
The 75th Congress .. .

VOL. XLVII No. 7ANANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WENESDAY, JAN. 6, 1937

PRICE FIVE CENTS

Answer Note,
Britain Tells
RomeBerlin
Fascist Nations Promise
Decisions On Volunteer
Enlistments Friday
Nazis State 'Palos'
Incident Is Closed
LONDON, Jan. 5.-(P)-Great Bri-
tain demanded tonight that Italy and
fGermany speed their decisions whe-
ther to agree to force a halt to enlist-
ment of foreign volunteers in the
Spanish civil war while a series of
diplomatic maneuvers heightened
tension throughout Europe.
As Britain thus sought to bring to
a climax one of the paramount prob-
lems of keeping the civil conflict
confine to local dispute, there were
these pertinent developments:
1. Germany ordered the Spanish
socialist government to give up the
sequestered cargo and passenger of
the freighter Palos by 8 a.m. Friday,
or lose to Fascists two Spanish ships
seized in reprisal. Berlin indicated.
however that there would be no new
reprisals and that the incident would
be considered closed, regardless of
Spanish action one way or the other.
Saturday Is Deadline
2. The British government de-
manded that Germany and Italy an-
swer not later than Saturday the
Anglo-French proposal of Dec. 23 on
banning foreign volunteers.
3. Germany and Italy indicated
their replies would be "conciliatory"
and that they would be forthcoming
Friday.
4. The Spanish Socialist ambas-
sador at London handed British for-
eign secretary Eden a note in which
his Valencia government held seizure
of the Palos cargo was "a perfectly
legitimate act"-because it allegedly
was composed of war materials.
5. The commander of the British
destroyer Grafton informed London
he had been given "satisfactory"
promises from Spanish fascist patrol
ships that British shipping rights
around the Straits of Gibraltar will
be honored. This statement was in
reply to British protest against the
halting of the English merchant ves-
sel Etrib by insurgent trawlers.
SFrench And British Confer
PARIS, Jan 5.-(/P)-French and
British general staffs talks to prepare
the defenses of the .two nations
against European war probably will
follow the conference between the
countries' war ministers, a source
close to the defense ministry said to-
night.
Witness Claims
Mrs. Baker Is
Psychopathic
Sheriff And Police Chief
Testify Gun Could Not
Be Fired Accidentally
A prosecution witness yesterday
described the attachment of Mrs.
Betty Baker, accused of the slaying
June 29 of Clarence Schneider, a
roomer in her home, as the result of
a "mother complex."
Milton Schancupp, Owosso at-
torney employed as an assistant in
the attorney general's office at the
time of the shooting, testified that
Mrs. Baker was "very sympathetic
and was always picking up dogs,

stray cats, or people who were in
trouble.''
Schancupp said that Mrs. Baker
telephoned him the night of the
shooting that he, as a family friend
and legal adviser, must "come at
once." "Something terrible has
happened," he said Mrs. Baker ex-
plained to him. I can't tell it over
the phone."
He arrived, he said, to learn "Cub,"
which was Mrs. Baker's pet name
for the 24-year-old Schneider, had
been "acting tempestous around the
,house and that Mrs. Baker had de-
cided to "put him in his place" by
frightening him with a service re-
volver belonging to her husband, an
Ann Arbor policeman. Baker, em-
ployed on the night shift, was asleep
at the time.
"Betty told me the gun accidental-
ly discharged and the bullet killed
Schneider," Schancupp testified.
"She said she never intended to kill
him-had no reason to."
Schancupp testified that he first
made Baker's acquaintance in 1921
when Mrs. Baker was employed in

Final Examination Schedules

First Semester, 1936-37
College of Literature, Science and the Arts, School of
School of Music, School of Forestry and Conservation,
Business Administration, and Graduate School.

Education,
School of

Exam
Group
Letter
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I '
J '
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R

Time of Exercise
To be used only
inc ase no
group letter is listed

Time
of
Exam

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Special
Special
Special
Special

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Monday,
Friday,
Wednesday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Friday,
Thursday,
Thursday,
Saturday,
Saturday,
Saturday,

Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Jan.

8,
5,
3,
1,
9,
1,
9,
8,
2,
3,
2,
10,
5,
4,
4,
6,
6,
30,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
2- 5

--

COLLEGE OF

ENGINEERING

January 30 to February 10, 1837
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the Time
of Exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for
courses having quizzes only, the Time of Exercise is the time of the
first quiz period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued through the
examination period in amount equal to that normally devoted to
such work during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between assigned
examination periods should be reported for adjustment to Professor
J. C. Brier, Room 3223 East Engineering Building before January
27. To avoid misunderstandings and errors, each student should
receive notification from his instructor, of the time and place of his
appearance in each course during the period January 30 to Feb-
ruary 10.
No single course is permitted more than four hours of exami-
nation. No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee.

Time of Exercise
Monday at 8
Monday at 9
Monday at 10
Monday at 11
Monday at 1
Monday at 2
Monday at 3

Time of Examination
Monday, Feb. 8 8-12
Friday, Feb. 5 8-12
Wednesdqy, Feb. 3 8-12
Monday, Feb. 1 8-12
Tuesday, Feb. 9 2-6
Monday, Feb. 1 2-6
Tuesday, Feb. 9 8-12

Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday

at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Monday, Feb. 8
Tuesday, Feb. 2
Wednesday, rFeb. 3
Tuesday, Feb. 2
Wednesday, Feb. 10
Friday, Feb. 5
Thursday, Feb. 4
*Saturday, Feb. 6
*Saturday, Feb. 6
*Thursday, Feb. 4
*Saturday, Jan. 30
*Thursday, Feb. 4
*Tuesday, Feb. 9

E.M. 1, 2; CE. 2
Surv. 1, 2, 4; German
M.E. 3; French; Draw. 1, 2
E.E. 2a; Met. Proc. 2, 3, 4;
Spanish.
Economics
Drawing 3

2-6
2-6
2-6
8-12
8-12
2-6
8-12
8-12
2-6
2-6
2-6
8-12
8-12
there is no con-

Both Parties
Of Assembly
In Caucuses
Push Routine Of Change
Of Administration Into
Background For Present
Republicans Might
Use Guiding Group
LANSING, Jan. 5.-(P)-The in-
coming legislature pushed the routine
of a changing administration into the
background today.
Democratic and Republican mem-
bers of the House and Republican
members of the Senate caucused to-
night to perfect their organizations.
Whether the minority senate group
would designate a floor leader was'
one of the questions to be threshed
out. Some members favored the ap-
pointment of a steering committee
in preference to loading the re-I
sponsibility of guiding Republican
legislation on one senator.
The Republican senators were un-
decided whether to nominate one of
their number for president pro-tem.
The Democrats had endorsed Senator
William A. Palmer of Flint. Because
the majority group had consented to
the retention of Fred I. Chase, Re-
publican, as secretary, some Republi-
cans were willing to concede the pro-
tem honor.
In the House the reelection of
Speaker George A. Schroeder seemed
likely. Representative Edward H.
Fenlon, St. Ignace Democrat, had
been boomed for the speakership, but
administration forces demanded that
Schroeder be given another term. It
was understood Fenlon was ready to
step aside unless an unexpected.
amount of support developed. It was
a foregone conclusion the House
Democrats would push through the
election of former Representative T.
Thomas Thatcher as clerk to succeed
Myles F. Gray.
Phi Kappa Phi
Holds Initiation
Dililier Toniiglit
Irofessor Hobbs To Speak
On 'Looking Beyond The
Horizon'; 45 Elected
Phi Kappa Phi, national senior
honorary society will hold its mid-
winter initiation banquet at 6:30 p.m.
today in the League. Professor-Emer-
itus William H. Hobbs will give an il-
lustrated lecture on "Looking Be-
yond the Horizon."
Prof. Roy S. Swinton, secretary of
the Michigan chapter announced yes-
terday that 45 students had been
elected to membership. The follow-
ing were seected from the College of
Literature, Science anid Arts:
Israel Finklestein, Thomas Wagner,
Vivien Greenberg, Adele Gardner,
Voltairine Hirsh, Betty Goldstein,
Thelma Zwerdling Thomas Fisher,
Frances Carney Willis Player, Wil-
liam Wilson, Lois King, Alvin Schot-
tenfeld, Edyth Turteltaub, Marie
Mette, Gretchen Lchmann, Jacob
Chason, Geil Duff endack, David
Swann. William Fleming, Jeane Mc-
Workman, Robert Hatch and Ona
Jane Thornton.
The following were elected from
the Engineering College: William
Young, David Eisendrath, John Eng-

strom, Frederick Hull, Benjamin Cox,
Frank Upson, Clifford Massie, Francis
Hamilton, William Findley and Leon
Sampson.
The following were chosen from
the Medical School:
Peter Crabtree, Henry Abbott, Mat-
thew Bennett, and Darvin Moosman.
Jane Ellen Rogers, Richard S.
Johnson, and John Krell were elected
to membership from the School of
Music, while Margaret Behringer and
Marguerite Knab were selected from
the School of Education.
The elections of Robert Harding of
(Continued on Page 2)
Bursle To Receive
Protest Of Workers
A complaint was filed with the
Men's Council Committtee on Stu-
dent Labor last night by employees
of the Michig-Inn, and will be for-
,warded to Dean of Student Joseph
Bursley today.
The students working at the State
Street restaurant protested in the

'General Stoppage Under
Way,' Declares Martin;
Strike Spreads
Secretary Perkins
Makes Her Report
DETROIT, Jan. 5.-(M)-Federal
agencies took an active hand today
in seeking negotiations to conciliate
labor-management differences in au-
tomotive plants of the General Mo-
tors Corporation, where nearly 50,000
.vorkers are idle.
Homer Martin, president of the
United Automobile Workers of Amer-
ica, said a "general stoppage of Gen-
eral Motors is underway," adding a
pledge of cooperation to "all govern-
ment agencies seeking to conciliate."
"Stoppage" In Janesville
The "stoppage" spread to Janes-
ville, Wis., this afternoon as union
members "sat down" at their jobs in
thn Chevrolet assembly plant and the
Fisher Body Works, halting produc-
tion and leaving 2,500 employes idle.
One of the workers who left when
company officials announced that
those who wished to return to their
sobs when operations started again
should go home, said that about 25
per cent of the workers obeyed.
Secretary Perkins carried to Presi-
dent Roosevelt reports of labor de-
partment field agents on the auto-
mobile strike situation, deadlocked
more than ever by Gener'al Motors'
refusal to recognize "any one union"
as sole bargaining agent for its em-
ployes.
After the White house conference,
she suggested both sides could ex-
pedite a settlement by negotiating
rather than by "trying their differ-
ences of opinion" in the public press.
She added she had not urged the
President to act "at this moment."
Neither the General Motors offi-
cials nor the automobile workers
have "indicated any unwillingness to
consider" informal suggestions al-
ready made by the labor department,
Secretary Perkins said.
Murphy Confers
James F. Dewey. a department
labor conc,iliator arrived in Detroit
today to confer with corporation and
union officials.
At Lansing, Frank Murphy, gov-
ernor of Michigan, said he had con-
ferred with both sides in the auto-
mobile strikes stressing he is attempt-
ing to hasten settlement but is not
acting as.a mediator.
The Special Senate Committee on
Civil Liberty Violations at Washing-
ton announced it has subpoenaed rec-
ords of -General Motors, and that
"high officials" of the corporation
may be called to testify at hearings
beginning Jan. 14.
Committee employes said friction
between General Motors and agents
of John L. Lewis' Committee for In-
dustrial Organization had been under
inves tig ation for "about three
months." The United Automobile
(Continued on Page 2)

Hung In Effigy

Auto Strike Based Upon
Fight For Shop Control;
Federal Agents Intervene

- Associated Press Photo
An effigy bearing the inscrip-
tion, "G-M Stool Pigeons" is shown
dangling outside the Fisher Body
plant in Flint, where one of the
far-flung General Motors strikes
stopped production.
Prof. Pollock
Awaits Senate
Action On Bill.
Prof. James K. Pollock of the po-
litical science department said yes-
terday that he expects to hear very
shortly from Senator Augustine Lon-
ergan, of Connecticut, regarding the
bill that Professor Pollock submitted
to a Senate committee investigating
campaign expenditures last month.
Senator Lonergan is chairman of
the committee of five members which
is studying campaign finances and
intends to recommend legislation to
the present Congress for plugging
gaps in the Federal Corrupt Prac-
tices Act.
Professor Pollock yesterday re-
fused to reveal tire provisions con-
taied in the bil submitted by him.
Fifty thousand copies of a booklet
prepared by the Michigan Merit Sys-
tem Association have been mailed to
.citizens throughout the state, advo-
cating the passage of the bill pre-
pared by the Civil Service Study
Commission providing civil service for
Michigan.

Stay-In Strikers Decare
'Speed-Up' To Be Their
Worst Grievance
'They Won't Evict
Us,' Workers Say
By RALPH W. HURD
Interviews yesterday with stay-in
strikers at the No. 1 Flint Fisher
Body plant, a prominent General
Motors Corporation executive and
the educational director of the United
Automobile Workers in Flint inter-
fused to form this conception of the
automobile strike:
1. Automobile employers fear a
'closed shop" and its attendant
'union control of production." Con-
sequently they are opposed to the
"real collective bargaining" demands
of the union.
2. Automobile workers believe
they have grievances which can be
settled only by "real collective bar-
gaining" (a national agreement);
and a "closed shop" represents to
them only a plant composed wholly
of unionized workers.
3. The one has its fears, the other
its grievances. Compromise is in-
evitable; the longer it is delayed, the
more unequal and drastic the set-
tlement likely will be. Favoring whom
-no one can predict.
ObJect To "Speedup"
Talking through the window with
strikers in the Fisher plant, the
question was asked: "What are you
striking for?" The most common
answer: "The damned awful speed-.
up."
"I can't even take time off to blow
my nose, when working on the line,"
said one.
"It's so tough working that I'm so
tired when I get home I can't even
treat my mother decently," said an-
other.
"There are eight of us working
with 1,800 degree blow torches on
each body that comes through," add-
ed another. "I'd like to see you work
in such conditions. If we worked
at anordinary pace, it wouldn't be
so bad."
Asked "What would you do if
police tried to evict you?" one striker
said, "Kill 'em!"-but was hurriedly
quieted by another who said, "We
are going to hold the plant at all
costs, but with a minimum of viol-
ence." (Several of the strikers were
seen carrying black-jacks.)
The General Motors official (who
would comment only if not quoted)
analyzed the situation this way: The'
whole question is, who's going to
control the shop-the management
or the union? All other issues boil
down to this.
Wages Higher Now
Wages now are higher than ever
before, the management more toler-
ant, the working conditions more ex-
cellent (you could almost eat off
most our floors). The majority of
our employees don't want to join the
union. Only approximately 8 per
cent have.
Many are coerced into joining (for
instance, union men will slow down
in one section, substantially reduc-
ing the wages of the non-union men
until the latter, submitting to the
economic pressure, join the union).
We do everything we can for our
men, but we can't, and won't, allow
union leaders to control and run the
shop.
Commenting on the stand taken
by Anthony Luchek, industrial re-
search assistant of the economics de-
partment in The Daily yesterday,
predicting victory for the General
Motors Corporation, Eugene C. Fay,
educational director of the Flint Au-
tomobile Workers, declared that Mr.
Luchek underestimated the potential
influence of the steel and mine work-
ers.

"We do not realize that we are in
for a bitter battle," he said "but with
the stoppage of automobile produc-
tion, General Motors will find itself
contending with the united forces of
the nation's steel, mine and automo-
bile workers."
(Continued on Page 2)
TEST UNION, SAYS SLOAN
NEW YORK, Jan. 5.-(.,P)-The
Herald Tribune says that Alfred P.
Sloan, Jr., president of General Mo-
tors who left here tonight for De-

*This may be used as an irregular period provided
flict with the regular printed schedule above.

Examinations To Begin Jan. 30;
Second Semester Starts Feb. 15

Final examinations for this semes-
ter will begin the afternoon of Sat-
urday, Jan. 30 and extend through
the afternoon of Wednesday, Feb. 10
according to the examination sched-
ules released yesterday by the secre-
tary of the engineering college and
Prof. H. C. Carver of the mathema-
tics department of the literary col-
lege.
The - schedules given out include
examinations in the College of Lit-
erature, Science and the Arts, the
College of Engineering, the School of

Education, the School of Music, the
School of Forestry and Conservation,
the School of Business Administra-
tion and the Graduate School.
Examinations in the engineering
college will last from 8 a.m. till noon
and from 2 till 6 p.m. Those in the
other schools will last from 9 a.m.
till noon and from 2 till 5 p.m.
Following the examinations, regis-
tration will be held from Thursday,
Feb. 11 through Saturday, Feb. 13.
Classes for the second semester will
begin Monday, Feb. 15.

Few Welshers' Among Student
Borrowers, Loan Officers Say

Roosevelt Might Have Become
First 'Lame Duck' President

By TUURE TENANDER
Franklin D. Roosevelt, by winning
the election last November, missed
the opportunity of becoming the first
lame duck president in the history of
the United States, Prof. Everett S.
Brown of the political science depart-
ment said yesterday.
"The 20th Amendment to the Con-
stitution brought an end to 'lame
duck' Congresses but, paradoxically,
it made possible 'lame duck' presi-
dents," Professor Brown said, "and
although attention was called to this
contingency when the proposed
amendment was under discussion in
Congress, little has been said about
it since."
The first two sections of the 20th
Amendment are as follows:
"Rpt-linn 1 'Thea terms'ivof t.he' Pres-

and such meeting shall begin at4
noon on the 3rd day of January, un-
less they shall by law appoint a dif-
ferent day."
"Should Landon have been elected
in November, as well as a Republican
House of Representatives, Roosevelt
would have served two weeks as Pres-
ident with a new and opposition Con-
gress, for under the amendment just
quoted, the 75th Congress assembled
today and the President will not be
inaugurated until Jan. 20," Professor
Brown said.
During this two-week period,
Roosevelt would have been the first
lame duck executive in history. It is
hardly conceivable, Professor Brown
said, that he would then have trans-
mitted to Congress his annual mes-
sage.

Reassuring news to the reluctant
fraternity brother who is wary about
advancing you "five" was given by
student loan officers yesterday who
described student borrowers as the
"best risks imaginable."
In the past 39 years $1,221,640 has
been given through the University,
with collection failures amounting to
only eight tenths of one per cent,
according to B. C. Stephens, Univer-
sity cashier. This per cent of the
thousands of loans granted amounts
to only 93 failures to pay and one
half of these losses resulted from
the death of the debtor or his utter
inability to pay r'ather than deliber-
ate dodging on his part, Mr. Steph-
ens said.
There are instances of deliberate
evasion of loans but these are ex-
tremely rare and money lost in this
way is more than covered by the in-
come from the investment of tem-
porarily idle funds, Mr. Stephens
stated.
This record is even more remark-
able when the procedure for grant-
ing loans to students is examined, ac-
cording to Dean of Students Joseph'

Payment of the loans by the stu-
dents usually begins four or five
months after graduation Stephens
said, and averages $10 at a time. The
present time and distance record is
held by a Japanese who borrowed1
$50 in 1910 and repaid the principal;
last June, another notable instance1
was that of a South American who
received $100 in 1914 recently re-
turned $300.
Last year 2,600 loans were granted
to 1,300 students according to the
Dean of Students Office, and the
maximum per year is $200 to a stu-
dent with a limit of $400 set for
each person. Juniors, seniors and.
graduate students are given prefer-I
ence in granting the loans and loans
are rarely granted to students unless
they have been in residence a year.
Requests for loans are varied in
their underlying motives, for some
are humorous and some pathetic,
according to Stephens, one that de-
served both of these adjectives was
requested by a young man who
wished to pay off some gambling
debts that were impeding his aca-

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