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November 28, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-11-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

" : r.... TIT'S MTfTT UN IIAITr

$ATURDAY, NOV. 28, 193E

Eight Workmen Di

e In Steamer Fire Athlete's Heart
Theory Is False,
Brace Declares
There is no truth in the age-old
theory that athletics enlarge the?
heart and cause "athlete's heart," ac-
cording to Dr. William M. Brace,;
acting-director of the Health Service.
Athletics don't enlarge the heart
because experiments have shown that
it really contracts after intensive ex-
-. ercise. Studies made with the elec-
tric cardiograph and the X-ray have
proved this fact, said Dr. Brace.
There is no such thing as "ath-
~ j lete's heart," continued Dr. Brace.
"Athletics will not hurt a normal
heart, but there is danger if the
person has a slight valve leakage,"
he explained.
Students who participate in coin-
petitive athletics are given very
thorough examinations to be sure
that they have no heart diseases.
Those who have defective hearts are
permitted to exercise mildly, but
- Associated Press Photo some not at all. "These people should
en who were installing a refrigera- never go into competitive athletics,"
oke out in the S.S. Scantic, dry- said Dr. Bruce.
-e forward deck after fire had swept Heart disease causes about one-
fourth of all deaths. Heart trouble
ain those of student age is caused by
rheumatic fever, severe infections, or
Chin s Money Plan if the heart has been abnormal since
birth, he declared.
Called SUccessful The idea that athletics are harm-
ful to the heart is not as prevalent
(continued from page 1)an idea as it used to be, said Dr.
(___tn____r_ aBruce. People are being educatedl
through health articles in newspa-
to that country and should givel pers and magazines to discount this
China easier access to both short mistaken theory
and long term investments. m
"The opportunity for long term z
investments are important to the Last Showing Today
United States but of even greater
importance will be the trade and For'Bury The Dead'
other international economic rela-|I

Graduate School Will Find Use As
Monumental Building, Says Martin

This is the second of a series of ar-
ticles dealing with features of the new past the League, and connecting with 1
Rackham Graduate School which The the Main Library in the center of the
Daily is printing this week. This series campus is planned. A centrallobby
will be followed by one about the Baird Icmu spand eta ob
Carillon and the Burton Tower. from which stairs and side wings will
By ROBERT MITCHELL run, is to connect this entrance with
A memorial to Horace H. and Mary the auditorium on the opposite side
A. Rackham, whose estate last year of the building. To the right of this
donated the money for its develop- lobby will be the office of Dean Clar-
ment, the new Michigan Graduate ence Yoakum, Dean of, the Graduate
School will be constructed and used School, and other administration of-
more as a memorial or monumental fices.. To the left will be a board
type of building than as a regular room and offices of the Rackham
class-room building, Dr. Dorr H. Mar- Foundation.
tin, '11A, superviser of construction Study Hall On Second Floor
for the architects of the project, stat- The second floor of the building not
ed yesterday. only will be occupied by the main
"Monumental," Mr. Martin stated, auditorium, but here also will be
"implies the establishment of per- found a large study hall which will
manence and beauty in a building as extend up through the mezzanine
well as an attempt to create an archi- floor to the top floor. This is the
tectural unity with its tradition and second largest room in the building,
purpose. Thus the new Michigan 37 feet in height. On this floor also
Graduate School is being built to be will be found a men's reading room
one of the most solidly constructed in the right wing and a women's on
and permanent buildings in Ann Ar- the left, as well as book and period-
bor, and it will also be unique in ical alcoves. The mezzanine floor will
town because of its facing, which contain exhibition rooms, while the
will be entirely in a particular kind of last floor, besides having an assem-
Indiana limestone. It will not only bly room and two rooms for informal
stand as the center of the graduate meetings, will also have a second and
school, but also as a memorial to its much smaller auditorium than the
donors. . main one. This auditorium is for lee-
No Class Rooms tures and will hold about 300 people.
A large auditorium and study hail The general outline of the build-
will be found inside the building and ings will have a stepped back ap-
exhibition and administration rooms, pearance. Each floor will have a
but there will be no class-rooms nor smaller area than the one below it.
professors' offices in the school." This consequently will leave room
In the interior plan of the building, space open at the sides of each of
a large auditorium son the north side the floors, and plans have been made
will be its most outstanding room, Mr. to utilize this space by creating ac-
Martin stated. About the size of one cess to it. Doorways are being pro-

Trapped by flames, eight workme
ticn system perished when fire br
docked at New Orleans. A view of th
the hold is shown here.

tions which they will create," Pro-
fessor Remer said. "It is of course
true that stable exchange will not
remove certain great barriers to the
introduction of foreign capital. But
stable exchange will remove one bar-
rier and it is an invitation to the

Irwin Shaw's anti-war play "Bury
the Dead," will be presented for the
last time at 8:30 p.m. today at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre by Play
Production.
The play which has been running
for the last three nights before largel

American manufacturer of capital audiences is under the direction of
equipmnpnt, the American business Valentine B,. Windt. It won the New
man, and the American banker to Theatre League prize in 1935 for the
join in an examination of the pos- play of the greatest social signifi-
sibilities and in the preparation for cance. It is the first stage success,
investment in China," he added. as well as the first play written for,
the stage, of the 24 year old author,
May Unify ChinaShaw
The new monetary policy is much The scenery, designed and con-
better for China than the old silver structed by Oren Parker, art direc-
standard, in the opinion of Professor tor of Play Production, is unique in
Reiner, and as far as the United that it overflows into the orchestra
States is concerned, he added, the pit which is used as the grave for the
latter will benefit by an increase in dead. Possessing a supernatural
the foreign trade of China, as will all theme, the production is noted for
other nations, and will lose some- its intensely realistic lines.
thing in a decrease of Chinese trade.

of the regular local theatres and
taking up the whole side of the build-
ing from the first floor, through
the second, to the mezanine, it will
accommodate 1100 people, about one-
half the capacity that could be fitted
into a room of its dimensions. This
is because almost three feet nine
inches will be left between the rows
of seats, permitting free passage be-
tween them without disturbing others
who are already seated.
Runway For Cars
A second feature wili be the audi-
torium's direct connections with taxi
and automobile service in the base-
ment. Below the auditorium a semi-
circular interior runway for cars
coming from Huron St. has been ar-
ranged, and guests will have to alight
at this point in the basement of the
building and walk up one flight of
stairs to reach the auditorium en-
trance. A limited parking space will
probably be available for officials also.
The entrance to the new Graduate
School will be from the south and
a mall running from this entrance,
occasion will be a joint meeting of
the University of Michigan club of
Flint and the Junior Chamber of
Commerce of that city.

h A

r

IODDY 01bile muloo VIU .
"The new monetary policy may
fail in the long run because Chinese
Registration: All those who have groups cannot be brought to cooper-
registration material are reminded ate, but is more likely to fail in the
that Saturday, Nov. 28, is the last near future because foreign interests
(Continued on Page 4) will not cooperate," Professor Rem-
er said. "Since the United States
played a part in obliging the Chinese
D 0 Ygovernment to launch out upon its
e"presen" monetary program by her
silver purchasing policy, she has add-
ed one more to the many reasons
WANTED which Americans have been looking.
with favor upon the rise of a modern
CLOTHING WANTED TO $UY: Any China under the sort of leadership
Old and new suits, overcoats at $3 which brought the new monetary
and $25. TYPEWRITERS, OLD policy into existence, and which
GOLD, and musical instruments. hopes to unify the country in an
Phone Sam, 6304. 78x effective manner."

KIPKE, TAPPING, TO SPEAK
Coach Harry Kipke and T. Hawley
Tapping, general secretary of the
Alumni Association will speak at a
meeting of the Michigan alumni in
Flint on Dec. 8, it was announced
yesterday at the Alumni offices. The
..and after the show or before-
DANCE (Free)
and EAT
at the
MICHIG INN
320 South State Street
"At the Sign of the Clock"

37'"K

i

I
F

Starting Today
SATURDAY!

1802
MAGI

CH EF

An opportunity to give a useful gift-one that
goes on giving for years and years. Expressing
the thoughtful consideration of the giver by re-
placing the shabby, obsolete stove with the
most beautiful and modern of all cooking ap-
pliances. On our floors now is a special Christ-
mas display of Magic Chefs- in many sizes and
color combinations.

I

W ih, lA ::,jf ,..

I

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