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November 24, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-11-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T E M I C I C N 1 IZ~Y TUESDAY, NOV. 24. 19 E

Dormitory Facilities In Other

Colleges Demonstrate Worth

Big Ten SCA's
In Cooperation,
Clark Believes
A new movement for cooperation
among the student Christian associa-
tions of large universities was point-
ed out yesterday by Richard Clark,

er elements of competition to meetin Chicago Alumni Will
"their activities. Chicago Uu t
"'Therefore, in the meeting atj Fete Undergraduates

(Continued from Page 3)
the experiences at many of the uni-'
versities can be accepted as adequate+
criteria, fraternities need not look
askance at the mention of dormi-
tories. On other campuses fraterni-
ties have made themselves more vital
in the lives of the students after hav-
ing dormitory competition so that,
regardless of the existence of dormi-
tories, the fraternities always attract
their quota of students. Thus fra-
ternities have managed to keep up
their finances as well as to offer the<
students who have the ability to pay
more than a dormitory could offer.
Effect Or Fraternities
At some universities the fraternities
have been absorbed within a general]
university housing system with fra-I
ternities existing alongside dormi-
Lcxries. Students, depending upon
whether they can afford to or not,
either join a fraternity or room in a
dormitory.
Still other universities report that
dormitories have hit the fraternities,
but the value of the dormitories in
providing housing for the majority of
the students instead of the select few
who can afford higher prices is ample
justification for the competition the
dormitories give the fraternities, if
the fraternities cannot offer more
to the students than do the dormi-
tories.
Townspeople Considered
In considering the townspeople
who were forced to close their houses
when dormitories were established,
many of the universities emphasized
that the installation of dormitories
to take care of the non-affiliated stu-
dents was so gradual that the people
renting rooms were not seriously in-
jured at any one time.
Then, too, it was shown that the
' disappearance of rooming houses has
seldom been complete for few uni-f
versitkes or colleges fully provide for
the entire men's student body. AlsoI
in several of the institutions the in-
crease in enrollment has progressed
more rapidly than have dormitory fa-f
cilities, so that extra-dormitory hous-
ing has remained necessary.
Outside Funds Obtained
In financing their dormitories the
majority of schools have receivedI
funds from the state legislatures and1
many have been the recipients of gifts
from alumni or friends of the univer-I
sities or colleges. Others received
loans or grants of money from the
government, while still others issuedI
bonds to raise the necessary funds
in order to offer adequate facilities
to the student body.
In none of the institutions, how-
ever, have funds for dormitories been
procured through student initiative,

as is proving necessary at the Univer-
sity of Michigan.
The most popular construction type
of dormitories has proved to be the
quadrangle which is divided into
houses, in turn divided into units ofj
from 20 to 30 men each, thus making

Northwestern a university council for
the large universities in the nine
North Central states was organized,
and it is hoped that this may grow
into a sort of federation of the Stu-
dent Christian associations of this
region, in which exchange of ideas
and cooperation among members
may be advanced. Ed Nestigan, of
Wisconsin, is the chairman."
Probably the next meeting of the
type just held will be postponed un-
til the first meeting of this new or-
ganization, which is now being
planned for the spring, Clark stated.

possible relatively small social groups. ,37 as he related the program and
Two Types Found Often work of the Conference of Presidents
The other type of dromitory which i
many of the universities have estab- of Big Ten S.C.A.'s and 'Y's, which
lished is the unit system which is he attended over the week-end at!
usually a long, straight building di- Northwestern University.
vided into houses and finally into The conference, which lasted from
smaller units; split up principally for Friday, Nov. 20 to Sunday noon, was
social reasons. atted a bou dntsnfrom
Once dormitories have been set upChtn r by abut 25 stud school
student administration readily de- i
velopes into student government, ac- about six states of this region, Clark
cording to the experiences of most said.
of the universities and colleges. Us- Although most of the work was in
ually a senior or graduate student is the nature of discussion and ex-
placed at the head of each unit in change of ideas, men who are lead-
an advisory capacity, whereas on the ers in Christian work were present
University campus, the freshmen re- to assist in the program. Orrin Ma-
ceived such guidance for only one gill, national field secretary of the
week-when they matriculate at the Y.M.C.A., took part in much of the
University. work, while Dean Thomas Graham
Finally, the units, being already or- of Oberlin College attended Sunday.
ganized, readily elect officers to rep- "One definite result of the meet-
resent them in an all-campuis govern- ing," Clark said, "was a crystallizing

The annual undergraduate lunch-
eon of the University of Michigan
Club of Chicago has been set for
Dec. 28, according to a letter received
from that organization by T. Hawley
Tapping, general secretary of the
Alumni Association.
At present, alumni authorities are
engaged in compiling a list' of stu-
dents from Chicago so that invita-
tions to the luncheon may be mailed
to them. The luncheon is to be con-
ducted as part of their regular pro-
gram to acquaint the undergraduates
with their local alumni unit
LEARN
w" TO DANCE
Social Dancing taught
daily. Ter.ace Garden
Dancing Studio. Wuerth
TheatreBldg. Ph. 9695
2nd Floor

WATCHES
and Jewelry Repairing at Rea-
sonable Prices - Crystals 35c
FISHOW'S
231 South State - Paris Cleaners

14

V

_ - u
- -----------

,
,

I

OPENIrNG TQORRQW
PLAY PRODUCTION'S
Wednesday through Saturday at 8:30
Price -Fifty Cents
Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre
BOX OFFICE NOW OPEN PHONE 6300

ing organization. In this way a
democratic, truly representative body
is placed at the head of the student
government.
LAW ELECTION TODAY
Law School elections of the senior
class will be held at 3 p.m. today in
Room 100 Hutchins Hall.

of the late movement among Chris-
tian associations of big universities
to treat their problems as different
from those presented to smaller
schools. For instance, smaller de-
nominational schools afford much
greater room for the religious side
of student Christian work than large
universities and they have much few-

L

EVENING RADIO PROGRAMS

C,
T tejC
the

R. 8.S. PAT:. OFF.

6:00-
WJR Stevenson News.
WWJ Ty Tyson: Dinner Hour (6:10).
WXYZ March of Melody.
CKLW Dinner Music.
6:15-
WJR Hot Dates in Music.
WXYZ Fact Finder.
CKLW News and Sports.
6:30-
WJR Jimmy Allen.
WWJ Bulletins: Odd Facts.
WXYZ Day in Review.
CKLW Joe Haymes' Music.
6:45-
WJR Renfrew of the Mounted.
WWJ Ye Merrie Men of Olde.
WXYZ Lowell Thomas.
CKLW Rhythm Orchestra.
7:00-
WJR Poetic Melodies.
WWJ Amos and Andy.
WvYZ Easy Aces.
CKLW Musical Echoes.
7:15-
WJR Diamond City News.
WWJ Drama: Evening Melodies;
Speakers.
WXYZ Rubinoff-Case.
CKLW Hal Kemp's Music.
7:30-
WJR Jack Randolph.
WWJ Soloist.
WXYZ Green Hornet.
CKLW Variety Revue.

Classjified irec wyj

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance 11c per reading line
(on basis of five average words to line)
for one or two insertions. 10c per read-
ing line for three or more insertions.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
Telephone rate - 15c per reading line
for two or more insertions. Minimum
three lines per insertion.
10% discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
WANTED
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY: Any
Old and new suits, overcoats at $3
and $25. TYPEWRITERS, OLD
GOLD, and musical instruments.
Phone Sam, 6304. 78x
ROOMS FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Baby Grand Piano. Fine
condition. Excellent tone. $4 a
month. Call 401 on University ex-
change. 184
-184
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at a low price. 6x
DID YOU KNOW-
That "Touch-Control," the device
for adapting the key tension of a
Royal typewriter to the varying
stroke of different operators, is the
most imitated typewriter improve-
ment in recent years?
The Royal standard typewriter has
had this feature for over twenty
years, but it is just since its adap-
tation to the Royal Portable that it
has been so widely imitated.
Royal "Touch-Control" adjusts the
key lever tension on each of the 42
keys by means of a universal bar
which increases or decreases the ten-
sion on all keys at once. This, coup-
led with accelerated type-bar action,
makes a snappy, easy action in any
adjustment.
One imitation introduces tension
at the last end of the type-bar
stroke, creating a slowing-up, slug-
gish stroke. The other common im-
itation introduces tension on the rib-
bon universal, placing a drag on the
key action which is unpleasant to an
experienced typist.
Imitation is the sincerest form of1

LOST AND FOUND

LOST: Two strand pearl necklace on
Church Street or campus Sunday
night. Keepsake. Reward. Call
2-3355. 185
LOST: Benrus shockproof men's wrist
watch. Square shape, white gold,
engraved: To Paul-from Mother
and Father--1932. Reward. Room
108 Fletcher Hall, or phone 4121-
307. 182
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Man's black fur overcoat.'
Size 38. Reasonable. 722 E. Kings-
ley. 7439. 183
NOTICES
A GUARANTEE SERVICE. Demoth-
ng, Mothproofing, Disinfecting,
Deodorizing, annihilating all house-
hold vermin, Fumigating. Offered
by the Kurtis Exterminating Co.
309 Maynard St. Phone 3113 for
free inspection. lix

7 :4 5--
WJR Boake Carter.
8:00-
WWJ Hammerstein's Music Hall.
WWJ Leo Reisman's Music.
WXYZ Dude Ranch.
CKLW Music for Today.
8:30-
WJR Laugh With Ken Murray.
WWJ Wayne King's Music.
WXYZ Edgar Guest in Welcome
Valley.
CKLW Pop Concert.
9:00-
WJR Waring's Pennsylvanians.
WWJ Sidewalk Interviews.
WXYZ Ben Bernie and All the Lads.
CKLW Gabriel Heatter.
9 :15--
CKLW Johnny Johnson's Music.
9:30-
:3WJR Caravan.
WWJ Fred Astaire: Johnny
Green's Music.
WXYZ Husbands and Wives..
CKLW Musical Restaurant.
10:00-
WXYZ Hildegarde.
CKLW Wallenstein's Sinfonietta.
10:30-
WJR Musical Program.
WWJ Jimmy Fidler.
WXYZ Portraits of Harmony.
CKLW Mal Hallett's Music.
10:45-
WJR News.
WWJ Royalists.
11:00--
WJR Scenes in Harmony.
WWJ Hockey Scores Russ Lyon's
Music.
WXYZ George Kavanagh's Music.
CKLW Trans-Radic: Al Kavelin's
Music.
11:3-
WJR Lions Tales: Olson's Music.
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Xavier Cugat's Music.
CKLW Freddy Martin's Music.
1 2: 00-
WJR Leon Belasco's Music.
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Morrie Brennan's Music.
CKLW Cab Calloway's Music.
12:30-
Maurice Spitalny's Music.
WXYZ Jimmy Grier's Music.
CKLW Veloz and Yolanda.
1 :00-
CKLW Dance Music.
-and after the show or before-
D ANCE (Free)
and EAT
at the
MICHIG INN
320 South State Street
"At the Sign of the Clock"
Today at 2:00 - 4:00 - 7:00 - 9:10
Last Two Days
TODAY and WEDNESDAY
The Sce,
iThe S * n Trembles
A ihd hV t "der of
The'Hea '
f ┬░abeathI.5 LBets

The BR-OAPTONEF

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colds 'enough ink at one
lling to fill two other pens
f equal size.
Five well-known fountain pens of sim-
ilar size and price were compared with
the Chilton Pen selling at $7.00. The
average ink capacity of these five pens
was 38 drops-while the Chilton held
81 drops.
Certified by Bigelow, Kent & Willard
Consulting Engineers, Boston, Mass.
A large and select stock of fountain pens of all leading makes -
Chilton, Waterman, Parker, Sheaffer, Wahl, etc.
Service Work a Specialty
0.D4 MORRILL
314 South Seate Street

1
rDistinguished
New Styling.
hy
Saffell -$ush

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MrA

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has the honor to'
presently
sIJICLAIR
f,.II
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DIGNIFIED, HANDSOME STYLE with
shoulders tapering to a crisply de-
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Beautiful fabrics pre-

sented in a range of prices from - - -
$32.50to $45.00

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