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November 20, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-11-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

n r Nr t r, v i r ix i;

MRIDAY, 'NOV. 20,1I939'

King Winter Conquers Niagara Falls in First Frost

Baxter Writes
First Bulletin
Oil Patholnav

P
Fo
pl.
00

" JEy
lantation Fungi, Disease,
Discussed In Circular By
Forestry Worker
The development and succession of
orest Fungi and Diseases in Forest
antations, the first in a series of
:casional publications by the for-

One - Twenty- Millionth Of inch
Measured By New Gauges Here
War Department Installs Professor Boston, to train men in the
An AcLabuse of the instruments on -any ob-
jects they wish. Industrial corpora-
In Engineering School tions make frequent use of the gauges
when there is an argument about the
Instruments so fine they can vir- measurement of some machine. At
tually measure the glint of light in present the laboratory is working on
a problem submitted by the chem-
one's eye-so accurate they can meas- istry department. The chemistry de-
ure a substance up to one-twenty- partment measures the electrical re-
millionth of an inch, are now at the sistance of liquids by means of glass
disposal of the College of Engineer- cylinders. The problem is to measure
ing, having been installed by the the inside of the cylinder all the way
United States War Department. through to see if there are any ridges
These gauges which use rays of or depressions.
light for rulers can measure the de-, Professor Boston showed blocks
gree to which a steel bar five inches so smooth they could not be pulled
in diameter and thirty inches long apart and could be separated only by
is bent by a man's finger pressure. sliding.
Tlus, in measuring an article, pres-
sure and one's body temperature must b

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-Associated Prees Photo
A freezing wind and a bright sun produced this spectacular scene at
Niagara Falls, the season's first freeze. Trees on Luna Island in the
foreground wore a veil of frozen spray. In the background are the
American Falls, the mist from which froze as it arose and settled on the
landscape.

Cissell Favors
Straits Bridge
For Mackinac
(Continued from Page 1)
accomplished, The detailed study of
the situation by engineers shows that
while undeniably a giant project, the
bridge can without question be suc-
cessfully constructed."
Because of deep water, Professor
Cissell explained, the shortest dis-
tance between the shores was deemed
undesirable. The shortest route is
slightly under four miles, he said, but
the line that was chosen is 5.17 miles
and directly connects Mackinaw City
and St. Ignace. This route takes ad-
vantage of many hundred feet of
shoals where the water is quite shal-
low, Professor Cissell stated, and this
would make the construction consid-
erably easier.
Ask Two-Lane Highway,
"The plans drawn up by the en-
gineers working for the Mackinac
Straits Authority call for a two lane
highway for automobiles and a single
track for railroad purposes, Profes-
sor Cissell said. "The longest span
would be 1,700 feet long and would
have a clearance over the water of
150 feet, enabling steamer traffic to
pass beneath."
The piers that support this long-
est span would have to be located in
the deepest water along the route-
about 180 feet. This is comparatively
favorable when compared with some
of the piers that were sunk in the
construction of the San Francisco-
Oakland bridge which is now open to
traffic, Professor Cissell said.
Piers Under Water
Professor Cissell has communicat-
ed with Charles A. Andrew, chief en-
gineer of the San Francisco-Oakland
bridge regarding the proposed stratis
bridge and Mr. Andrew was of the
opinion that the Michigan job should
not hold great difficulties. According
to Professor Cissell, piers were con-
structed on the West Coast that went
a depth of 240 feet. Mr. Andrew
added that from observations during
the construction of the San Fran-'
cisco-Oakland bridge, there was
every good reason to believe that
piers could be built as far' as 300 or
more under the surface of the wa-
ter.
The bottom is extremely good for
construction purposes, Professor Cis-
sell said, consisting in the deeper
waters of lilpestone and other types
of durable rock.
"The present ferry system was in-
augurated by the state in 1923," Pro-
fessor Cissell said turning to the
present method of transportation be-
tween the peninsulas.. "The state's
total investment in boats is about{
$690,000, and in docks about $850,-I
000, totalling about $1,540,000."

estry school dealing with the research
of faculty members and graduate
students, is to be published in the
next few weeks, Prof. Dow V. Baxter
of the School of Forestry and Con-
servation, author of the bulletin, said,
yesterday.
Results of observations of the
pathology of forest plantations cov-
ering a several year period are re-
ported in the pamphlet, according
to an explanation in the foreword by;
Dean Samual T. Dana of the forestry
school. Particular stress is placed on
two phases of the subject. First, thej
role played by adverse site factorsA
to physiological ailments and attack
by fungi, and second the succession
of diseases that commonly occur in
plantations as contrasted with na-
tural stands. Dean Dana further de-
clares in the foreword that the bulle-;
tin is particularly timely because of,
the tremendous scale on which for-
est planting is now being done
throughout the country. It is expect-
ed by the forestry school that this re-
port should stimulate further investi-
gation in the little known but out-
standingly important field of plan-
tation diseases.
Original Prints
'Are Exhibited
in Alumni Hall.
O iginal etchings, dry points,,wood-
cuts, and lithographs which belong
to the collection in the Fine Arts
study room, are now on display in the
South Gallery of Alumni Memorial
Hall.
These prints have been acquired
from various sources. Among those
from the set acquired through the
Carnegie Corporation are one by Co-
rot and two by Whistler. From a set
of ten which the Institute of Fine
Arts has received as members of the
American College Society of Print
Collectors which issues two prints
each year, there are those by John
raylor Arms and Alfred Hutty.
Three other well known artists who
are represented are Orozco, George
Ross, and Reginald Marsh,

be taken into account.
Prof. U. W. Boston of the metal
processing department of the College
of Engineeringissin charge of these
instruments. Courses, facilitated by
this laboratory, in manufacture of
artillery munitions are now givbn to
members of the local University R.O.-
T.C. Ordnance Unit by Major R. E.
Hardy. Next year Professor Boston
plans to offer a course to College of
Engineering seniors. t
The War Department is setting up
these laboratories in various strategic
spots throughout the country in an
effort to prevent the recurrence of
the confusion which took place at the
time of the World War. At that time
all the equipment for accurately
measuring gun bores was located in
Washington. Much valuable time
was lost. The University of Michigan
is in the Detroit district, declared
Professor Boston.
The use of the laboratory is not
limited alone to war, purposes at
present. It is planned, continued
SMARTEST
HAT SHOPPE
Michigan Theatre Bldg.
All Hats Reduced,
c -$45-$195
Velour Velvets and Felts
All Head Sizes
II
READ THE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

FALL
FESTIVAL
at SCHWABEN HALLE
217 S. Ashley St.
on Saturday, Nov. 21
Good German Orchestra and
all kinds of fun and refresh-
ments. Bavarian Folk Dances.
Starts 8:30 p.m. Everybody is
invited.
Admission 25c

II

SMARTEST
HOSIERY SHOPPE
Michigan Theatre Bldg.
Just received -another ship-
ment of Ringless Full-Fash-
ioned Hose, heel within heel:
Three-Thread Ringless Crepe
79c
Two-Thread Sandal Foot
See the new selection of Satin
Panties, Dansette's, Slips,
Gowns, and Pajamas.

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,8K THE NATIONAL SAFETY COUNC/S

row 4k

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Stage An
Elegant Entrance
A LUXURIOUS
VELVET WRAP
It's what you'll need
for the gay whirl of
pre-Christmas formals.
Many Models - in Black
and Wine
$ 495and $1995
Week-End Spacial
ALLEN-A -
SILK HOSIERY
Pure Silk - Perfect Quality

KADETTE RADI OS
$9.95
Rufus-Winchester
Company

211 East Liberty

Dial 2-2644

..1

Last
CHAS. RUGGLES
MARY BOLAND
"WIVES NEVER KNOW"

Times Today

ERIC LINDEN
CECELIA PARKER
"IN HIS STEPS"

I

79c

F/i

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MATINEES 25c
EVENINGS 35c
5 BIG DAYS!

rVyLIAJEIJ/

Starting Saturday!

3 pairs $2.25
Choose these Colors--Juliet, Helen,
Carmen, Black Magic, Trilby.

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mi AO -A,0

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