100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 18, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-11-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.:;. __ T ifIE MWI HIcx N D AITEY WEDNESDAY, NOV. 18, 190

ace Oosten Says Lak
g Need Governm

i

By JAMES E. DUNLAP
Unless immediate federal or in-
ternational action is taken, the im-
portant Great Lakes fisheries will
soon be commercially exterminated
possibly within the next five years,
according to Dr. John Van Oosten, in
charge of the Great Lakes Fishery
Investigation which has its head-
quarters in Ann Arbor and is a divi-s
sion of the U. S. Bureau of Fisheries.
"By thinking only of its present4
gains and nothing of the future, the
fishing industry is cutting its own
throat," Dr. Van Oosten said. Be-
cause the smaller fish often draw!
higher prices, many fishermen find it
exceedingly profitable to put fish of
pre-spawning age on the market. As
a result, within a few years the spe-
cies become relatively scarce, and the
companies must either shut down en-
tirely or resort to producing some
other and less desirable species.
Cites Whitefish
"A good example of this is the
famous Lake Superior Whitefish',"
Dr. Van Ooosten said. "While this
variety still finds a prominent place
on most hotel and restaurant menus,
it long ago took a nose dive from an
annual production of three and a
half million pounds to a level of less
than 500,000; and virtually none of
those now served the traveling pub-
lic have ever been near Lake Su-
perior, most of them coming thou-
sands of miles down from the lakes
of northern Canada."
An even more striking example is
that of the Lake Erie cisco, which
was completely wiped out commer-
cially. During the 10 years from
1924 to 1934, the cisco experienced a
decline in annual production of over
99.5 per cent.
Others Threatened
"The tragedy of the entire situa-
tion is that as soon as one fishery is
wiped out another one is threat-
ened," Dr. Van Oosten commented,
"for the nets that had been employed
in catching the exterminated species
are assigned to the capture of others.
Thus, the collapse of the cisco fishery
led to sharply increased production
of chubs, as a substitute. Now the
chubs are struggling for existence."
The United States Bureau of Fish-
cries, which was invited by the Lake
Erie fishing industry to study the sit-
uation when the cisco suddenly be-
came extinct, discovered that the one
outstanding weakness in the admin-
istration of the fisheries is the lack of
uniformity of state laws.
In the main, both Michigan and
Ontario have fine regulations, but
they are ineffective unless the other
states which border the Great Lakes
adopt similar rules.
For example, Michigan has a 16.5-
inch limit on the wall-eyed pike,

Fisheries Writes While Dying
ent Relulation t
which Ohio has only a 13-inch 1Emit.;
The outcome of such a situation is
that the Ohio fishermen receive all
the benefits of Michigan's high re-
striction and the fish none.
"Likewise. while both this state
and the province of Ontario have
very commendable sets of fishing
regulations, the fact that they are
not the same cuts down their ef-
fectiveness to an extraordinary de-
gree," Dr. Van Ooosten added.j
"Michigan has a closed season of sixe
weeks on the chubs of Lake Huron; > 3
Ontario does not have closed seasons.
Thus, while Michigan men are com-
pelled to take in their nets and pro-
tect the fish, Ontario continues op-,
eration and thus nullify the effec-
tiveness of Michigan's closed season
at the expense of the Michigan fish-
ermen."
Conferences Called
Nineteen conferences have been Associated Press Photo
called, 10 within the past eight years, Leakng illuminating gas proved
in an attempt to unify the fishing fatal to Jack R. Meltzer (above) of
regulations; but not one of them has Chicago, Harvard law school grad-
been successful. nate student, in his room at Cam-
Conservation departments of the bridge, Mass., as he penned a letter
various states unanimously agree to his family in which he told of
that drastic measures must be taken the numbing effects of it, appar-
in order to save the Great Lake fish- cntly not suspecting death was
eries, but because the general popu- near.
lace of the states can't understand-
the importance of the issue and be-"
cause the commercial fishermen who Iowa Provides
oppose the program of conservation
departments raise such loud ob-
jections, the legislatures are unable M en
to take any action.
One Possibility Remains InlD ormitories
"The only remaining possibility of
saving the fisheries from the im-
pending danger is to put the entire (Continued from Page 1)
problem into the hands of the fed--_ _ __
eral government, giving it the power dormitory has decidedly helped us to
to make and enforce laws which will check the increase in room rents in
affect all states equally. town."
"And this, of course, can only be The Quadrangle, began in 1918 and
accomplished if the fishermen, who constantly added to until it now
are slowly beginning -to see the prob- houses 700 students, was termed
lem they are facing, can persuade "very successful both financially and
their states to appeal to Washing- socially. It has paid for itself and
ton for help," Dr. Van Oosten con- now makes a profit which will be
cluded. used later to invest in another dormi-
tory for men." The Quadrangle is,
as the name indicates, in the shape
W orkshop Is Used of a quadrangle with an interior court
rkabout 400 by 200 feet; thus all rooms
For Radio Program are outside rooms. Boarding facili-
ties are also furnished in the Quad-
In the sixth of the series of "Ac- rangle.
tuality" broadcasts, Prof. Waldo Ab- The administration of the dormi-
bott, director of University broad- tory is carried on through a system
casting, took the microphone into the of cooperative government main-
industrial arts workshop of the Uni- tained by the students residing there-
versity high school where an infor- in. The governing body is made up
mal program was conducted yester- of a group known as the Quadrangle
day. 'Council, composed of councilmen
The broadcast, held on the Univer- elected by the students and proctors
sity radio hour and carried over WJR, appointed by the dean of men. This
presented an explanation of the work makes regulations governing order
the students were doing. Prof. Mar- and study hours, and assumes re-
shall Byrn, of the vocational educa- sponsibility for maintaining whole-
tion department explained the tobog- some, clean living conditions.
gan-making, machine work, metal The rooms in the Quadrangle were
work, and the various other jobs that described as "large, 14 by 17, with
the students were engaged upon. single beds, hot and cold running
The "Actuality' broadcast sched- water, and a telephone in each room,
uled for next Tuesday, Nov. 24, will if the occupant desires. The rooms
take place in the Automotive Lab- are completely equipped; the bedding
oratory where Prof. Walter E. Lay, is provided and laundered. Each stu-
of the mechanical engineering de- dent has his own study table equipped
partment, will demonstrate by sounds with an electric study lamp, and the
how the engine and parts of an auto- room is also provided with a central
mobile are tested by students. ceiling light."
"ABurning ?)Frontiers"
A Musical Comedy
By PROF. L. J. CARR and DR. HEINRICH HANDORF
Presented by
THE HAMPSTEAD COMMUNITY PLAYERS

Thursday, November 19, 8:15 p.m.
Pattengill Auditorium, Ann Arbor High School
Sponsored by Junior Chamber of Commerce
TICKETS: 35c - 50c - 75c
at Wahr's Bookstores, Fischer's Pharmacy,
and 207 East Washington, Phone 21-21-1
STARTING TODAY
A Riot Of Fun
I-
p & MA-MA 1
THAT WOMAN'S
H ER E AGA INI"
Be firm, Mrs. Bixby,'
your husband needs that
sort of experience!" IVOSNG ATv it
2:00 - 4:40 pPdm lJe Gwln9'f
7:10 - 9:50 V lI reaed by
--- And---
AN Aw ANAAlCI
20,000000 RR.E.4

Fitzgerald Begins, I
Drafting Of Bndgetf
LANSING, Nov. 17.-0P)-Gover-
nor Fitzgerald began the task today
of drafting a state budget for con-
sideration by the 1937 legislature.
Shortly after the Nov. 3 election
Governor Fitzgerald invited Gov-
ernor-Elect Frank Murphy to attend
budget hearings, but Murphy in-
formed him he could not attend.,
Fitzgerald told Murphy in a letter!
today he would welcome any repre-
sentative Murphy might send to
these conferences.
The Governor indicated he would
recommend a budget considerably
higher than that of the past bien-
nium.
Jurisdiction Of Court
To Be Decided Today!
DETROIT, Nov. 17.-( M-Record-
er's Judge Donald Van Zile said to-
day he would rule tomorrow on
whether his court has jurisdiction to
try five alleged Black Legion mem-
bers on charges of murdering Silas
Coleman, -a Negro, in another coun-
ty.
The judge, after hearing argu-
ments of attorneys, took under ad-
visement a motion to dismiss the
case.
Defense counsel contended the
court lacked jurisdiction because the
crime occurred in Livingston county.

Diction Class
Goes n;WJR
At 2:15 Today
The sixth broadcast of Prof. Gail
E. Densmore's class in pronunciation
and diction will go on the air today
at 2:15 p.m. over Station WJR.
The course, as given over the Uni-
versity radio hour, deals with the cor-
rect pronunciations, exact meanings;
and :derivations of the common words
frequently mispronounced. The pro-
gram also deals with a comprehensive
presentation of the more literary
words and expressions in current us-
age which the average vocabulary
should include.
A mimeographed copy of all words
to be discussed, together with in-
structions and a reading list, will be
mailed to listeners upon the receipt
of six cents in stamps, or, if the
student wishes, he may receive a
copy at Morris Hall.
Thus far, more than 1,200 copies
have been sent out to interested
listeners.
REAL HOME COOKING
Under New Management
UNIVERSITY GRILL
615 East William, just below State

_ _._

Swin V
Junior State S
Pr
V
vi
T
J-
C
Vote between 3:0
Identifc

......... ...-

"ih STAT E
treet Lit. School Noninees-
res., JOE MATTES
/ice Pres., BETSY ANDERSON
ec., RUTH FOWLER
reas., EARLE LUBY
-Hop Chairman, ED. THOMPS{
entral J-Hop Committee -
Fred Cushing, Jane Willoughby,
Ed. D'Aprix, Ruth Friedman

- 7
II
ON
all

00 - 5:15 p.m., Rm. 25 AngellIH
cation Cards are Necessary

L ...._. ._ _I

WANTED: Home Laundry: Family- m C c
piece or bundle. Also student laun- Aeriean Conclave
CLASSIFIED dry. Call 2-1140. 163 Will Further Peace
ADVERTISING LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Place advertisements with Classified Careful work at a low price. 6x (Continued from Page 1)
Advertising Department. Phone 2-1214. ROOMS FOR RENT
The classified columns close at five __of a European war to this continent,
o'clock previous to day of insertion. TO RENT - Apartment available he believes.
ex ra chaers may be secured at no from Dec. first for four months. "No European war could go on very
Cash in advance 11c per reading line Comfortable first floor apt., com- long without the financial assistance
(on basis of five average words to line) pletely furnished. -Five rooms. Tel. and raw materials of North and
for one or two insertions. 10c per read-
ing line for three or more insertions. 7716. 171 South America." And if the war did
Minimum three lines per insertion. not last very long the probability
Telephone rate - 15c per reading line FOR SALE is very great jhe American coun-
for two or more insertions. Minimum _s___rygreat__heAmericanc___-_
three lines per insertion. NEW and old books. Antiques. 202 tries could stay out, he said.
10% discount if paid within ten days East Ann 127x Besides a neutrality accord there
from the date of last insertion. (_._127x-is the possibility of reciprocal tariff
FOR SALE: Brand ndw full dress agreements which would not only en-
WANTED broadcloth suit, size 38. Reason- gender good will but would result in
WANTED TO BUY: Old U.S. Army able. Phone manager of Griswold the quantitative betterment of Amer-
uniforms in any condition. Call Hotel. 166 ican trade, he said.
4742 after 6 p.m.
COMPANIONT (Male) for bicycle MOD RE PRICES
tour. England, Wales. June, July. R E
Estimated expense $350-$450 in-
cluding cabin-class passage. Box 6.Q
Michigan Daily. 170f
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY: Any
Old and new suits, overcoats at $3
and $25. TYPEWRITERS, OLD
GOLD, and musical instruments.
Phone Sam, 6304. 78x
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Black wallet. Robert Addison. TOG 1Z
If found, return to Harold David- me E.liberfy Phone 4434
son, 4917. Reward. 172
LOST: Kappa Nu fraternity pin, AN OFFiCIAL MICHIGANENSIAN
jeweled initials, I.R.I., M, '39. 800
Lincoln, 3936. Reward. 169.PMOT0GRAPHER
LOST: A small silver wrist watch,
Swiss movement duo-dial; black
cord strap. October 24. Reward.
Phone 8661. 167 FOU-R kHAP'Y HEADLINE STARS
NOTICES
e Together in one
PIANO for rent. Standard upright,
Good make, good condition. Phone
3701. 173 .
SOFT WATER shampoo, wave 50c.
Gabrieleen permanents. Best sup- p cked s su
plies. Open evenings by appoint- prise hitl
ment. Juanita's House of Beauty.
3023. 55x
LAUNDRY
WANTED: Student and family
washings. Soft water used. Call
for and deliver. Tel. 5260. 168
_A of -

i
i
'
T
r

THE NOVEMBER ISSUE
OF THE NATION'S OUTSTANDING
COLLEGE COMIC
THE MICHIGAN
GA RG OYL E
"Something To Fit Your Every Mood"
JOKES, CARTOONS, STORIES,
CAMPUS GOSSIP, FASHION
REVIEWS, PREPOSTEROUS
PEOPLE, ETC.
ON SA LE
NOVEMBER 19th
WILL BE SOLD FOR
ONLY ONE DAY

i
4
i

11

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan