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November 04, 1936 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-11-04

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o.rfi rwrn

The Weathier,
Continued cold today;
with diminishing winds.

fair

L

3k igun

&t14;

7 A.M.
FINAL

i

VOL. XLVII No. 33 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 4, 1936

PRICE FIVE CENTS

Roosevelt

Sweeps

45

Stat

Five

Triumph
Millions;

By

Popular

Majority

Of

Murphy

And Brown

Victors

In Michigan

Republicans
Sweeping All
County And
LocalOffices
Landon, Fitzgerald And
Brucker Gain Substantial
Leads In Out-County
Michener Leading
In Second District
Ann Arbor's Second Ward
Gives Roosevelt, Brown
Slight Margins
With only 17 of 35 , Washtenaw
County precincts reported at 7 a.m.
today, the Republicans appeared to
have made a clean sweep of county
offices.
Earl C. Michener, Republican in-
cumbent, in the race for representa-
tive for Congress, led his Democratic
rival, Charles E. Downing, 42,213 to
17,504 in 16 outcounty precincts and
Ann Arbor's second ward.
In the contest for Judge of Probate, I
Jay G. Pray, Republican incumbent,
had a substantial majority over Har-
old D. Golds, Democrat, and appeared
to be certain of reelection. Albert J.
Rapp, Republican incumbent, was
well ahead of Hubert Thompson,
Democratic candidate, in the race for
Prosecuting Attorney.
Sheriff Jacob B. Andres, Republi-
can incumbent, had a large lead l
over Ezra Tisch, Democratic candi-
date, and appeared to be sure of re-
election.
Gov. Alf M. Landon had a good
majority over President Franklin D.
Roosevelt in the county, and Gov.
Frank D. Fitzgerald, Republican,
seemed to be far enough ahead here
to assure ,his carrying the county
over Frank Murphy, Democratic can-
dioate, while Wilber M. Brucker, Re-
publican candidate for the United
tSates Senate, appeared to have
Washtenaw County in his column,
defeating Rep. Prentiss M. Brown
here.
Emmett M. Gibb, Republican can-
didate for County Clerk, seemed to
have enough of a majority over his
Democratic opponent Wirt M. Masten,
Democrat to assure his victory. In
the County Treasurer race, Charles
E. Crittenden, Republican, was far'
enough ahead early this morning to
almost assure him victory over his
Democratic opponent, Jane Forshee.
Katherine W. Skau, Republican in-
cumbent, was far enough ahead this
morning to practically guarantee her
victory over Raymond H., Orr, Demo-
crat, in the contest for the position of
Register of Deeds. In the contest for
Circuit Court Commissioners, Joseph
C. Hooper and Lee N. Brown, Repub-
licans, were fare ahead of the Demo-
cratic candidates, Arthur C. Lehman
and Joseph Zwerdling.
A victory appeared imminent for
Cornelius. W. Tuomy, Republican
candidate for Drain Commissioner,
over his Democratic rival, J. Lester
Miller. Edwin C. Ganzhorn. and
Bradley M. Harris, Republicans, were
far ahead of the Democratic candi-
dates, Ward W. Martin and Marvin
Ray Hannum in the contest for Coun-
ty Coroner.
Results in second ward, Ann Arbor:
Landon, 1,060; Roosevelt, 1,304; Fitz-
gerald, 1,366; Murphy, 1,068; Bruck-
er, 1,076, Brown, 1,214; Michener,

(R) 1,110, Downing, 1,160; Judge of
Probate: Pray (R), 1,094, Golds, 1,-
267; Prosecuting Attorney: Rapp (R)
1,187, Thompson, 1,171; Sheriff: An-
dres (R), 1,572, Tisch, 814; County
Clerk: Gibb (R), 1,191, Masten,'1,142;

Receives Largest Majority In History

Detroit Vote
Will Insure
Murphy Lead
Entire Democratic Ticket
Assured Of Victory In
Michigan
G.O.P. Losers in 7

Carry Michiga

Only

Three States

Return Republican

Margin

In

Voting

Congress

Seats

-Associated Press Photo
PRESIDENT FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT

The Vote By States
ASSOCIATED PRESS ELECTION RESULTS
RETURNS EARLY TODAY
Popular Vote

Indicated
Electoral Vote

a
ul

U
4.tiU

o.

4)
a
0
0

.
0
a

x
a

,-'
' o
U) V
o
o a
11
3

Wilber Brucker Downed
As Brown's Vote Goes
1 Over 300,000
DETROIT, Nov. 3.-()P)-Returns
from 1,686 out of 3,470 precincts for
President, give:
Landon, 331,779.
Roosevelt, 411,443.
Lemke, 22,004.
DETROIT, Nov. 3.-(fP)-Returns
from 1,603 out of 3,470 precincts for
Governor, give:
Fitzgerald, (R) 351,651.
Murphy, (D) 337,472.
DETROIT, Nov. 3.-(AP)-Returns
from 1,573 out of 3,470 precincts for
U. S. Senator, give:
Brucker, (R) 295,907.
Brown, (D) 339,321.
Ward, (T-P) 18,051.
Huge Detroit Democratic majori-
ties unaccounted for at 7 a.n. today,
were e o ected to give Frank Murphy
victory over Frank D. Fitzgerald'in
the neck and neck race for governor.
A spectacular and unprecendented
Democratic victory in Michigan gave
victor yto Prentiss Brown over Wil-
ber M. Brucker in the United States
senatoria lcontest.
The Detroit Democratic vote was
expected to reverse slight leads where
they existed for Republican candi-
dates.
Seven of the State's 17 Congres-
sional seats went to Democrats, three{
of them were in doubt early today
and Republicans took the rest.
DETROIT, Nov. 4.-(P')- State
Treasurer Theodore I. Fry, the onlyt
today while the contests for the other1
Democratic incumbent seeking re-
election, piled up a 30,000 lead early I
five elective state offices, excluding l
the governorship, remained close as 1
Wayne County returns were coming;
in slowly.
The tabulation of 1,247 precincts, 1
including only 75 from strongly Dem-
ocratic Wayne County ,gave Fry 269,-
002 to 238,500 over Howard Warner, 1
son of a former governor and Re-1
publican nominee for state treasurer.
Justice Harry S. Toy maintained a1
slight lead over Burt D. Chandler,
Democrat, as tabulation continued
but it was considered likely that theI
margin would be reversed when
Wayne County ballots were counted.
In 1,206 precincts Toy had 237,389
votes to 235,110 for Chandler.
George T. Gundry, Flint Demo-
crat making his first race on the state
ticket, rolled up a 5,000 margin over
Auditor General John J. O'Hara,
1,274 precincts giving Gundry, 256,-'
788; O'Hara 251,232.
Raymond Starr,Oof Grand Rapids,
continued to lead Attorney General
David H. Crowley. The tabulation of,
1,277 precincts gave Starr, 260,596,l
and Crowley 254,571.
Former Lieutenant Governor Lur-

- Associated Press Photo
FRANK M. MURPHY

Dorm Project
Assured Help
Of Fraternities,
Two Resolutions Passed.
At Special Meeting:
AdvisingSupport
Support was extended the men's
dormitory project by the Interfra-
ternity Council at a special meeting
last night.
At the meeting, which was attended
by less than 25 fraternity presidents,
the following resolution was passed:
1. "The Interfraternity Council,
acting as a body, recommends to the
individual fraternities that they sup-
port the movement for men's dormi-
tories for freshmen. The Council
feels, after a thorough discussion,
that the movement is worthwhile and
merits the support of the student
body.
2. "The lower staff of the Coun-
cil will be willing to assist the dormi-
tory committee in the promotion of
the project."
This resolution will operate in the
promotion of the first project of the
Committee on AMen's Dormitories,
the Dorm dance to be given Nov. 13
in the Intramural Building.
The motion concerning support of
the project put on the table a week
ago last night was discarded and
with the adoption of the present reso-
lution the Council, presided over by
George Cosper, '37, turned to the
rushing problem.
The following were appointed the
rushing committee: Jack Otte, chair-
man; Edward Higgins, '37; Charles
Swartout, '37; Harrison Church, '37;
Miller Sherwood, '37; and Walker
Graham, '37.

Michigan returns gave Roosevelt a
20,000-vote lead with safely-Demo-
cratic Wayne County returns only
partially reported.
Gov. Alf M. Landon admitted de-
feat in the small hours of this morn-
ing when he dispatched the follow-
ing message to the President in Hyde
Park:
"The nation has spoken. Every
American will accept the verdict, and
work for the common cause of the
good of the country. That is the
spirit of democracy. You have my
sincere congratulations."
Final figures confirming the voting
lineup as it stood early today would
give President Roosevelt 47 more elec-
toral votes than he received in his
landslide election of 1932.
Led From First
The trend of a Roosevelt landslide
was steady almost from the first. Ne-
braska, Iowa and Landon's own Kan-
sas gave Republican leads in early re-
turns but Democratic strength con-
tinually manifested itself until all
three states were safely placed in the
Democratic column.
Roosevelt support was especially
apparent in the big cities as the totals
accumulated. New York, Cihcago and
Philadelphia voted heavily - Demo-
cratic.
Democratic majorities were espe-
cially large in the South and on the
Pacific Coast. Washington, Oregon'
and California voted two to one for
Roosevelt. In the Middle West Illi
nois, Indiana, Ohio, Wisconsin and
Minnesota all went approximately
two to one for the Prestidet.

Franklin D. Roosevelt was reelected President of the United States yester-
day with 519 of a possible 531 electoral votes and the most overwhelming
popular endorsement the nation has ever given a Presidential candidate.
Only Maine, Vermont and New Hampshire, boasting 12 electoral votes
together, were counted safely Republican on the basis of Associated Press
election returns at 5 a.m. today.. Roosevelt was given 13,630,691 votes to
8,310,248 votes for Gov. Alf M. Landon, Republican Presidential candidate.
New York, Pennsylvania and Michigan, all regarded as doubtful states,
gave President Roosevelt and the New Deal thumping endorsements. New
York returns gave the Democratic candidate a majority of well more than
one million votes, while Pennsylvania deserted the Republican Party for the
first time in returning a Democratic lead of 400, votes.

Alabama ............ 2,206
Arizona..............443
Arkansas ............2.156
California.........11,716
Colorado............1.250
Connecticut ..........169
Delaware ............232
Florida .............1,322
Georgia .............1,766
Idaho.797
Illinois ..............7,912
Indiana °.............3,840
Iowa..............2,442
Kansas .............2,690
Kentucky ...........4,299
Louisiana ...........1,584
Maine ...............633
Maryland... . .....1,453
Massachusetts.......1.765
Michigan ...........3,469
Minnesota ..........3,724
Mississippi ..........1,659
Missouri ............4,357
Montana ............1,237
Nebraska ...........2,031
Nevada ..............256
New Hampshire .......295
New- Jersey ..........3,581
New Mexico ..........914
New York..........8,950
North Carolina......1,860
North Dakota .......2,245
Ohio...... ........8,600
IOklahoma.:.........3,421
Oregon .............1,625
Pennsylvania ........8,010
Rhode Island.....:...245
South Carolina......2,272
South Dakota .......1,958
Tennessee ...........2,295

817
172
200
7,006
213

98,378
26,731
13,261
795,704
25,021

163 374,085
130 28,841
711 122,774
589 135,023

14,171
10,607
2,240
433,106
18,504
271,352
21,606
37,874
13,218
9,471
853,009
291,468
168,318
167,311

4 9
22
246 6
70 8
3
7
64 12
393 4
44,457 29
1,672 14
5,954 11
9

37
567

- Associated Press Photo
PRENTISS M. BROWN
G.O.P. Sign Stays
In Spite Of Protest
Despite protests from local Demo-
cratic headquarters, a large poster
listing Republican candidates for na-
tional, state -and county offices re-
manied throughout yesterday with-
in 75 feet of the polling place in the
second ward on Ashley St.
Prosecuting-Attorney Albert J.
Rapp said last night that the poster
did not violate the election laws
which specify that no handbills may
be distributed within 100 feet of the
polling booth.
The law makes no mention of pos-
ters, he said.

141
4,981
1,385
920
1,195
2,032
180
611
1,106
705
834
355
147
2,240
147
592
169
260
915
160
7,001
934
379
2,564
2,505
677
6,019
240
700
667
1,480

16,725
1,408,256
433,810
221,832
178,259
273,913
73,625
124,375
297,077
297,327
190,700
110,489
21,683
483,049
29,684
77,528
11,087
79,069
251,969
27,571
2,712,708
334,581
34,550
434,598
344,353
66,517
1,758,116
163,143
83,987
55,903
144,761

165,870
7,545
166,551 7,307
165,895
222,552 32,999
167,713 9,943
50,366 14,184
713
294,356 736
11,604 365
67,335 2,878
4,830
83,385
136,151
12,915 22
1,721,784
84,449
15,998 5,289
296,233 23,805
158,580
36,374 3,339
1,311,511 38,764
124,017 18,201
1,345
46,709 2,536
77,689 73

11
10
8
17
19
11
9
15
4
7
3.

5

Cigar Butts And Tattered Signs
Mark End Of Another Election

41

16
3
47
13
4
26
11
5
36
4
8
4
11

By JAMES A. BOOZER
As Ann Arbor's downtown streets,
spattered with tobacco juice and ci-
gar butts, see the light of a new
dawn, another election day has.
passed. As the counting of record
votes was carried into early morn-
ing hours this is how this mid-west-
ern city looked to a roving Daily re-
porter:
6 p.m.
A call to Republican headquarters

bid-." The attendant at the cigar
counter, one ear on the radio, in-
creases its volume as election bulle-
tins come in. Faculty members pres-
ent indicate a deep intrest in the re-
turns. Some of them amble over to
the radio as returns are announced.
9:30 p.m.
Three persons and a newspaper cor-
respondent hold the fort at the Re-
publican headquarters, where stacks
of unused posters, stickers, and cam-
paign literature grace the polished
mahogany desks. A gentleman with
a Landon button, taking down out-
state returns over the radio, hurls
his cardboard to the polished floor.
Democratic headquarters: more than
30 men and women are seated in
nondescript chairs, and a borrowed

many cases reported more than two
to one victories for Roosevelt.
New Hampshire, still Republican
but conceded to the Democrats by
Col. Frank Knox late this morning, is
the only undecided state remaining.
(By The Associated Press)
The New Deal victory climaxed a
campaign notable for bitter intensity
of feeling. Scars remain to compli-
cate the task of the reelected chief
executive in carrying on the New Deal
program.
There was little expectation, among
those who have closely followed the
developments of the last two months,
that the Republican minority would
lend any cooperation to the Presi-
dent in furthering his program.
He intends, he said in his closing
public address to seek the restriction
of the hours of the workers of the
nation, improvement in their wages,
and working conditions-NRA ob-
jectives which by their very nature
must make for intense conflict.
Changes May Be Made
Indications are that some changes
may be made in the Social Security
Act, subject of the campaign's bit-
terest controversy, throwing the
whole question of that embattled
legislation into Congress again.
Congress will meet on Jan. 3. The
House will receive the report of the
electoral college and on Jan. 20 Pres-
ident Roosevelt will ride to the capital
for his second inauguration. There-
after, a resumntion of old eathnes s

en D. Dickinson and Secretary of brings the announcement that there
State Orville E. Atwood were able to was somebody there who would offer

maintain their slim leads in their
respective races against Democratic
candidates. In 1,298 precincts Dick-
inson had 266,835 to 263,329 for Leo
J. Nowicki Atwood polled 269,678 to
256,755 for Leon D. Case in 1,280 pre-

25 to 2 odds on Landon.;
7 p.m.
Daily telephones start an incessant
jangling. Hundreds of people were
told that no returns were yet avail-.
able. Office hangers-on refuse all

C

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