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October 29, 1936 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-10-29

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THE. MICHIGAN DAILY

P1

Attendance Not

Compulsory At
Oxford ollege
Professors OftenI eture
To Audences Composed
Of Three Students
Britishers Also Grind
Dawson Explains Campus
Traditions Of England's
Educational Center
By FRED THOMSON
At first the thought of a lecture
class that no one attends but the pro-
fessor is quite ludicrous, but, accord-
ing to Prof. John P. Dawson of the
Law School, this is the very condition
that exists at Oxford University, at
least in many scheduled lecture sec-
tions. Professor Dawson, who spoke
last week on the University radio
hour, recounted many unusual facts
and anecdotes about the English Uni-
versity which he attended as a Rhodes
Scholar.
"Often," asserted Professor Dawson,
"very distinguished faculty members
will be found lecturing to small,
faithful bands of three or four stu-
dents, and very often there are sched-
uled lectures that haven't been at-
tended for years. This is because at-
tendance is never taken."
Three Semester At Oxford
"As for semesters," reflected Daw-
son, "there are three of them of only
eight weeks duration." The long
vacations which intersperse the short
terms are, strange to relate, usually
the only periods when the studying
is done. This might be explained,
perhaps by the fact that Oxford is
such a lively place during the school
semesters, it requires 'grinding' to re-
trieve ground lost by social func-
tions, suggested Dawson.
As a balm to the inherent campus
attitude that Michigan is too pa-
ternalistic, comparison should be
made with Oxfoid's University and
colleges which still remain puritan-
ically obsessed with surrounding the
student with every possible safeguard
against 'contaminating' influences.
The gates of the college close about
9 pm., and the student can get in
by paying a small fine which in-
creases in amount up to midnight-
that is, if the student can not clam-
ber over the wall.
Midnight Is Deadline
After twelve, however, the student
can't get in, according to Professor
Dawson. As a result the student who
errs-and gets caught-is obliged to
visit the proctor, the dean, and the
moral tutor--or get expelled.
"Then there are the 'bulldogs," add-
ed Prof. Dawson. "Pleasant fellows!
It seems that they are students chos-
en by the proctor to accompany him
on his habitual nocturnal promenade
through the 'public houses' (which
are somewhat comparable to a group
of 'Pretzel Bells') to ascertain whe-
ther any of the students are in them.
Bulldogs Are Strong
Althought the 'bulldogs' are chosen
for their strength, speed and mem-
ory of faces, they adhere to a sort
of code of honor inasmuch as they
always start out at the same time
in the evening and never take any
except the prescribed route through
the town, stated Professor Dawson.
The crowning point of the Oxford
paternalistic attitude is the rule that
no undergraduate may talk to any
town girl, let alone go out on a
"date" with her. But there is, as
some would hold, a redeeming feature
about the "beer" custom of the Uni-
versity. Although no member may
go out to a public house to purchase
the foaming brew, he may secure it
direct from the university, and re-

ceive the bill on his semester fee.
Music School 'Frio
Will Play Sunday
A special concert program by three
members of the School of Music
faculty will be given at 4:15 , p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 1 in Hill Auditorium.
Prof. Arthur Hackett, tenor, Prof.
Wassily iBesekirsky, violinist, and
Prof. Joseph Brinkman, pianist, will
comprise the faculty group.
Professor Hackett who has con-
certized both Europe and America
will offer three selections by Do-
naudy and three by Cimara. Profes-
sor Besekirsky and Professor Brink-
man both well-known concert per-
formers, will join in offering Beeth-
oven's Sonata, Op. 47 (Kreutzer) and
Chausson's "Poeme," Op. 25. Profes-
sor Brinkman will complete the pro-
gram with "Miroirs" by Ravel.

Deposed Emperor And Empress of Ethiopia Attend London Tea Professors Attend
Bibelal Convention
Two University faculty members
will present papers before a conven-

WILL ATTEND CONVENTION STUART GETS AWARD
Elsie A. Pierce, '37, Managing Edi- Gathings Stuart was the recipient
tor of The Daily and John Park, '37, of the Alpha Kappa Psi Scholarship
Business Manager of The Daily left Medal, awarded annually to the
last night to attend the convention ! highest ranking first year student in
of the Associated Collegiate Press to the Business Administration School
be held Oct. 29-31 in Louisville, Ky. at a dinner held last night.

tion of the National Association of
Biblical Instructors meeting this
week-end at the Oriental Institute
of the University of Chicago, in con-
junction with the Chicago Society of
Biblical Research and the mid-west
division of the Society of Biblical
Literature Exegesis.
Prof. LeRoy Waterman, head of
the Department of Oriental languages
and literatures, will read his paper,
IJacob, the Forgotten Supplanter" at
the Friday afternoon session. Prof.
H. A. Sanders will read his "A Third
Papyrus of Matthew and Acts" at the
evening session.
The convention is attracting bibli-
cal students from the middle west and
Canada. It will be a non-sectarian
gathering with the purpose of finding
and disseminating occult facts and
sources of information in the Bible.
e'en Part
Set For Saturday
A Hallowe'en party for all the
youngsters of Ann Arbor will be held
from 7:30 to 9:30 ,p.m. Saturday in
Wines field.
Preparations, were started yestpr-
day for the party by committees rep-
resenting various civic organizations
and clubs in the city. The party,
which is purely an experiment will be
held every Hallowe'en- if it proves to
be successful this year.

- Glainerous ~

-~ Associated Press Photo
Former Empress Mennen of Ethiopia, is shown making her first public appearance since going to England
with the depos2ed Emperor Haile Selassie. Here they arc atter d.ing a London tea last week: Left to right:
Lady Paish, who is pouring tea; Empress Mtnenen; Emperor Halle Selassie, and Ras Kassa, former Ethiopian
leader.

Discovery Of Mahogany Cane
Arouses TraditionsOf '80s

varsity Glee Club

To Open

Season

Stick Is Given To Kipke
During Football Trip
To Minneapolis
By IRVING S SILVERMAN
Traditions of the '80's and the res-
surection of memories of the old law
schools were revived by the accident-
al discovery of an old mahogany
cane in Minneapolis, Minn.
How the cane, deluged with in-
scribed names of students and faculty
of the '80's and other lavish designs
came back to the University, is con-
cerned with Coach Harry Kipke's
visit to the University of Minnesota
with the football team.
While Kipke was in Minneapolis a
policeman brought the cane to him
saying that he had found it in an old
abandoned house in that city and
figured it belonged to a former stu-
dent .of Michigan. At the foot of
the cane is ornately inscribed "In
Memory of Ann Arbor" and at the
top is boldly written in the wood "W.
G. Starnsahan, Law Class of '80, U.
of M."
Aigler Given Cane1
Kipke, upon returning to Ann Ar-
bor, turned the cane over to Prof.
Ralph W. Aigler of the Law School
and chairman of the Board in Con-
trol of Physical Education, who in-
formed The Daily of its recovery.
Upon investigation it was found
that the cane belonged to William
Galloway Stranahan, '80L, later a
manufacturer living at 2820 Bloom-
ington Ave., Minneapolis, Minn. Pro-
fessor Aigler suggested that such
canes inscribed with names of class-
mates and instructors were a com-
mon practice in the '80's. Among
the faculty names at the head of the
cane where also is a crude etching
of the old law building, are "Cooley"
(Thomas McIntyre) who was dean
when the law school was merely a de-
partment, and also dean of the School
State And WPA
Announce Hugre
Road Program
LANSING, Oct. 28.-(AP)-The State
Highway Department and the Works
Progress Administration announced
an $11,000,000 road construction pro-
gram today to continue through the
winter in the Upper Peninsula and
the northern part of the Lower Pen-
insula.-
The program, financed by the
WPA, will provide grading and drain-
age structures along tourist routes.
These will be surfaced with Federal
road aid appropriations later.
State Highway Commissioner Mur-
ray D. Van Wagoner and Louis M.
Nims, State WPA director, said $5,-
000,000 will be spent in the Upper
Peninsula and $6,000,000 in Lower
Peninsula counties north of the Bay
City line. They said no new WPA
allocations to Michigan were in-
volved.
Nims said the program will permit
WPA labor to work on federal high-
ways by agreement with Washington
EMBROIDERY and MONQGRAMMING1
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of Political Scince, instituting that
department, and who later became.
chief justice of the Michigan Su-
preme Court. The other faculty mem-
bers listed are "Felch" (Alpheus)
who was a regent of the University in
1842-1845, and governor of Mich-
igan in 1846-1847; "Campbell"
(James Valentine), "Kent, (Charles
Artemas), "Walker" (Albert Henry),
and "Wells" (William Palmer).
Several of the close to 100 student
names on the cane are "Angell" (Al-
exis Caswell) who became a professor
in the law school and later a judge;
George DeRue Meikeljohn who be-
came lieutenant-governor of Ne-
braska and later became secretary of
war under President McKinley; and
"Parker" (Frank Wilson) who be-
came chief justice of the Supreme
Court of New Mexico in 1919. f

The Varsity Glee Club swings into
action next week, opening with a
concert before a convention in Ypsi-
lanti, in the auditorium of the high
school. Other engagements are al-
ready scheduled, including several
special broadcasts from the campus
over WJR. Concerts at Adrian,
Dearborn and Toledo have been ar-
I ranged for the near future.
Robert C. Williams, '37, president
of the Glee Club, has also announced
special contests for various positions
in the organization. Already there
is a long waiting list of those want-
Pig to express themselves musically.
1- -- - "-- - -- --
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* NEWS FLASH! * *
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Mrs. Elizabeth Bowles of Uvalde, Texas,
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HALLOWE'EN
SPECIAL
Friday, Saturday, Sundany

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