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October 28, 1936 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-10-28

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SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Paul Engle, Speaker Tonight,
Possesses Variety f4 Abilities

I

Young Poet 'Won His Oars'
At Merton College; Was
Rhodes Scholar
There probably aren't many poets
who could step into an eight-oared
shell and pull a steady 32 strokes a
minute for three or four miles of
river, but Paul Engle, noted young
author of "American Song," who will
lecture tonight at the Lydia Mendel-
ssohn Theatre, is one who is as much
at home on the water as at his desk.
During his residence at Oxford Uni-
versity, where he has been a Rhodes
scholar for three years, Engl was a
member of the first, or. varsity eight,
for his college, Merton, and succeeded
well enough in the "Summer Eights"
along with his fellow-oarsmen to win
his oars, it being the curious and per-
haps costly custom in England to
present the victorious crew with oars
instead of colored flannel letters.
Engle brought his trophy-oars back
with him to America. At that, they
are probably no more out of place in
the apartment than the goal posts
torn down by American college alum-
ni following the victory in the big
game.
Engle also rowed on the University
crew at the celebrated regatta at
Henley-on-Thames this summer. The
coxswain and stroke oar of the crew
were Australian, and the other seven
members English, Engle being the
only American, a rare distinction.
Still in his twenties, Paul Engle
has already published three volumes
of verse. Following his graduation i
from Coe College in 1931, Engle stud-
ied at Columbia, where he received
his master's degree. From 1934 to
1936 he studied at Oxford.
Peace Council
Will Assemble
In open Forum
How Armistice Day may be made
to teach a lesson of peace will be
taken up at the second meeting of the
year of the Peace Council, to be held
tomorrow in the Union, Julian H.
Orr, '37, president, announced yester-
day,
.Orr said that the meeting would be
largely devoted to a discussion of the
Armistice Day program. He also said
that plans for the remainder of this
semester would be discussed.
"It should be understood that the
Peace Council is not a closed organ-
ization, but is open to all who are in-
terested. It should also be clear that
the council does not stress any one
attitude for the prevention of war or
attempt to further the cause of any
particular group.
"It is an attempt to consolidate all
the sentiment against war into a
united front," Orr said. He urged all
members to be present because of the
urgency of the business to be dis-
cussed.
Nash Motors And
Kelvinator Merge
DETROIT, Oct. 27.--(P)-Directors
of the Kelvinator Corporation of De-
troit, manufacturers of electric equip-
ment, and of the Nash Motors Com-
pany of Kenosha and Racine, Wis.
automobile manufacturers, voted to-
day to merge the two concerns, which
have assets totaling about $55,000,000.
George W. Mason, president and
chairman of the board of Kelvinator
made the announcement late today
after Kelvinator directors met here
and Nash directors met in Chicago.
The new company will be known as
the Nash-Kelvinator Corporation.
with Charles W. Nash as chairman of
the board of directors and Mason as

president. Officials here would make
no comment on reports that the Nash
plant might be removed to Detroit.
Mason said the plan of merger
will be submitted to stockholders of
both companies as soon as necessary
legal papers can be prepared.

P~oet Lecurer ilere

Don't be a dilatory prorogater.
Purchase your Ensian on Campus

PAUL ENGLE
Brilliant Ear-Muffs
Prove Harbingers
Of Winter Frigidity
Anti-freeze was in Ann Arbor
Arbor yesterday, and radiators were
wheezing in the Romance Languages
Building, but of the many harbingers
of winter that prevailed perhaps the
most undeniable were ear-muffs.
Temperature readings made at the
University Observatory heralded the
approach of winter with a low of 22.2
for yesterday. However, the imper-
sonal interpretations of science lacked
the threat of winter contained in a
single pair of Scotch plaid ear-muffs.
Besides warning of the approach of
winter, ear-muffs have a distressing
effect on some individuals, according
to laments widely heard yesterday.
Even reminding them that they are
worn promisciously at Bryn Mawyr
and Princeton doesn't seem to miti-
gate their disapproval. Nevertheless,
harsh old winter will not long be de-
nied and ear-muffs, it is safe to pre-
dict, will soon be the "rage."
Murphy Will Speak
here After Parade
Frank Murphy, Democratic candi-
date for governor, will speak from
the steps of the County Courthouse
here following a torchlight parade to
be sponsored by the Washtenaw
County Democratic committee at 7:30
p.m. Friday.
The parade will march through the
streets of Ann Arbor, and University
students will be asked to carry the
torches. The parade will start at the
Union right after the pep meeting.
All persons interested are asked by
the committee to join in the parade.
The place for its formation has not
yet been announced.
Latest Books
From two to three dollars a book
you will pay,
To read it just once and lay it
away -
You can read many more if you
do it this way -
Read any of inine for five cents
a day -
LATEST BOOKS CLEAN COVERS
Et
BLUE BI3RD
Book Nook
Rental Library 4 Nickels Arcade
-I-

today.

Our salesmen will give it awa~y
at the lowest price of the year.
Bring four dollars for a full pay-
ment or one dollar for a down
pyment.
We have a date today.
Yif you're smart
The MICHIGANENSIAN
A "putter-offer" to you.

t

4

I j

Toet sCorner
If you've got a gal and you
like to dance
Better get a ticket while you
have the chance
For they're going fast and they
sure won't last.

I

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