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October 24, 1936 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-10-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FACIE TTI"E

SATURDAY, OCT. 24, 1936

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

VarsityBattles Lions Today To Keep Intersectional Slat(

e Clean

Passing Attack1
To Be Feature
Of Both Teams
Wolverines Point For First
Victory of Season; Loiko
And Smithers To Startt
(Continued from Page 1)f
quarterback and Johnny Smithers
will start at one half back position. It
will be either Bob Cooper or Stark
Ritchie at the other and at fullback
Kipke said he would start either the
veteran Cedric Sweet or Tex Stanton.
Wally Hook, the sophomore that
has been getting all the play this week
as a running back, is sure to get into
the fray before it is many minutes
along and might even start at the un-
settled half position. Hoever, Kipke
wants an experienced man in that
position when the firing starts but
will not know until just before game
time what his choice will be.
It is pretty much of a certainty that
Cooper and Sweet will not be playing
at the same tie, as Kip wants to
shift some of the ball carrying bur-
den onto the shoulders of Ritchie,
Hook and Stanton and at the same
time keep one good punter in the
backfield.
Backfield Is Uncertain
Sweet's kicking was the standout
of yesterday's practice and if it is
again in the pre-game workout this
afternoon he will start at fullback
with Ritchie at half. If Cooper is
doing the better punting he will start
and Stanton will be at full. In this
case Hook and Sweet would probably
be sent in together to replace Coop-
er and Stanton.
This will be the fourth start of the
season for the Wolverines, having
dropped the first three to Michigan
State, Indiana and Minnesota. At
the same time Columbia has beaten
Maine and V.M.I. and lost to the
Army, 27-16.
Hubert Schulze, Lion left end, will
handle the kicking assignment for
Columbia and if he repeats former
performances will outkick Michigan.
His average to date is 42 yards per
kick. That Columbia's vaunted aerial
attack is just as good as the experts
claim is proven by the fact that the
Lions have completed 22 out of 44 at-
tempted passes this year. As a result
fans at today's battle may expect to
see Luckman heaving many a for-
ward to Schulze and Sie al, his two
ends.
Speed Is Columbia Asset
The one definite advantage that
the Wolverines hold over the invaders
is in weight. Only three of the
Lions tip the scales at better than
185 pounds while Michigan's line
will average close to 200 pounds. This
apparent advantage may be offset,
however, by the superior speed of
the Columbia eleven. Michigan fans
will remember that although the
Wolverines outweighed State, the
Spartans were so much faster Michi-
gan found it hard keeping up.
Hook is the fastest man on the
Michigan squad and Kipke is hoping
that with good blocking this sopho-
more may be put in the open where
he should be able to capitalize on
this speed for long gains.

-____Thinclads HoldF
The PRESS ANGLE Season's First
1n
By GEORGE J. ANDROS Outdoor Trials r
j LD MAN" (Fielding H.) Yost figure why we have been losing all M
came out with his semi-annual our games. The present team is the Coach Hoyt Well Satisfied
defense of the Michigan football sys- hardest working squad I've had at W V So n I
tem yesterday, basing his remarks on Michigan and I know the boys are With Varsity howing,
the Wolverines' record over the past giving the team everything they have. Freshmen Run Poorly a
14 years but quoting statistics only I
from the eight years in the seasons "I am pleased with the squad's A small fraction of Coach Charlie
mentioned during which the Varsity loyalty to me and our coaching
won or tied for the Big Ten title. policies and methods and there's Hoyt's track squad, noticeably minusg
"The Coach" closes his prepared not a player that I can criticize veteran performers, braved the chillt
statement with: "After all, the ef- for lack of competitive spirit or football weather yesterday afternoon
fectiveness of all offense and defense eagerness, to remove warm-ups and runp
depends on the abilities of the per- "I cannot believe that I have through the first time trials of theĀ°
sonnel." slipped any great extent in the last k
Who was it who in September said two years in my ability as a coach. 1963Cac keason.
the196 ichga sua apeaedtoTo those who claim that the Michi- Coach Ken Doherty's freshman
the 1936 Michigan squad appeared to sw am thinclads also went through their
be one of the strongest ever to prac- gan style is outmoded, I extend an th d lsownt trg teir
tice on Ferry Field? He was a qual invitation to name a type of play thatj rather discouraging first paces in1
ticeon erryFied? e wa a ual any major team uses that we do not conjunction with the Varsity trials.b
ified observer, too. have in our repertoire. We have a Despite the cold weather and lack
Consistency is no mean virtue. sei our playsra fl vae o of workouts Coach Hoyt expressed
" series of sucker plays, a full variety of isl sbigvr aife ih
spiners an ssotmet offorardhimself as being very satisfied with
COACH HARRY KIPKE came out spiners, an assortment of forward the showings made by the Varsity S
of the elevator of the Union last pass formations and as many forward men who competed in the meet and
nigt jst fte hehadfinshe tak-laterals as any one. The fact that our especially well pleased with the
night just after he had finished talk- players do not always click, especially showings made by the Sophomores,
ing to the team before the trip to on the passing plays, should not cause notably: Alan Smith in the cen-
Plymouth for the night, the widespread belief that the foot- tury, Ross Faulkner, in the quarter,
He looked tired and worried (and I ball parade has marched away from Harvey Clark in the half-mile, Char-
couldn't blame him), but he grinned Michigan on the basis of playing sys- lie Clark in the broad jump and Har- o]
and said: "No I haven't read them tem and scheming technique. old .Davidson in the practice mile h
yet" as I pointed to the afternoon "One of the oustanding reasons and a half distance..t
papers folded under his arm. that Michigan's Big Ten record was Smith started the festivities with a c
The "wolves" are quiet tonight, I far ahead of the league until two bang as he took the Stoller-less 100- a
thought, but they'll be haunting you years ago was to be found in victories yard dash in 10:2 seconds to leavec
in your sleep, Kip. They are gathered won through frequent kicking and the Fred Schwarze floundering in his
tonight like the witches in "Mac- breaks that usually developed in the backwash, five yards back in sec-
beth"-and all hell will break loose course of the punting maneuvers. ond place. wk
Sunday morning-if-. There has been nuch severe criticism In the half-mile, sophomore Har-i
If what? If Michigan loses to Co- of our retention of the punting policy. vey Clark nosed out veteran Ed De- a
lumbia for the fourth straight loss of There has been no change in football vine, who had taken an early lead
the year. generally that justifies this criticism, to win the event in 2:01.
Kip only continued grinning when The difference is that Michigan no By far the best event of the af t
I asked him about the game. And longer gets those breaks after the practince wadistanche mile and a half t
it was his privilege to refrain from kick and prayer.' Why the breaks practice din id which the four t
don't come is just one of those things, leaders, Fink, Brelsford, Davidson t
comment then. and Pinkerton set such a blistering a
But I wondered if he were not "Our team is inches away from pace that Coach Hoyt found it neces-H
thinking that the "witches' caldron" being -a good team. We are so sary to flag the runners to a slower
would cool and all hell would not, close that one good upset victory pace in the last 220 yards for fear t
break loose if Michigan won. probably would put us back on that they might injure their legs d
Yes, the "wolves" will put their the track. Movies taken in the in the cold air. The runners fin- b<
tails between their legs and run for games we have lost show vital ished coasting, in good time. l
cover-if- tackles missed by a sixteenth of Ross Faulkner, sophomore quarter w
* * * an inch; blocking off in timing by miler, pulled the only real upset
MANY students have asked me how a split second. With the old of the afternoon when he won han- U
Coach Kipke feels about the Michigan victory complex, these &ely from Chuck Miller, veteran 440 N
Michigan football situation. In yes- same boys would be missing by man to take the race in .52 flat. 12
terday's Chicago Tribune appeared those narrow margins. Faulkner took command early to win e
99going away. e
an interview with Kip that the coach "The great danger confronted by goeng ay. e
commented on last night. I reprint a coach who is pressing to regain lost verted from a sprinter to a low hur-
in part the quotations. prestige is that of working his players dler, ran a very smooth and prom-
too hard. I have sought to avoid ising solo flight of lows in the rather a
"Michigan alumni and 'downtown this. I ordered two scrimmages this slow time of 25.9 seconds, which may o
coaches' of Ann Arbor, Detroit, and week, however, and I am hoping that be attributed to the fact that he had pi
other nearby points are not unique this extra work will get us set to been previously told to strive more 1:
in howling at the coach of a losing take Columbia into camp." for form than speed. a
football team. There is no mystery ----__
to me about the attitude of these
complainants. But there is plenty of 08X
Imystery to me about what has hap- .:
pened to the victory complex that " f:
made Michigan the best in the land . . .,"
during the early thirties. N
"I can understand why we aren't:
still tops. Stiffened entrance require-
ments have affected our raw material.
The mystery appears when I try to
H. E. PHILP II fIMRI M C RdAlITY

Faculty Swim Classes
To Begin Next Week
Varsity Coach Matt Mann an-
nounced yesterday that the 10th
enewal of his faculty noon swim-
ming classes will get underway
Monday and continue five days a
week throughout the year.
More recruits for the beginners'
class which will meet on Tuesday
and Thursday from 12:15 to 12:45
p.m. are needed, Coach Mann stat-
ed and urged that all faculty men
interested in having a healthful
good time join up by getting in
touch with him.
The "Flounders Club," or inex-
perienced class, will meet as usual
on Monday, Wednesday and Fri-
day at the same time as the be-
ginners' class. The "Flounders"
were first organized when Coach
Mann first came to Michigan in
1926.. New members from the
beginners' class are advanced each
year.
1 Y
ud Luckman Is A
Star Now, But Once
There Was A Time-
Sid Luckman, the sensational soph-
more around whom Coach Lou Little
as built his offense, may be all that
he Columbia coach desires in a well
oordinated halfback who can pass
end kick with the best backs in the
ountry.
But-there was a time when he
vas known as a gangling awkward
id who had considerable trouble
n keeping his feet in their correct
nd desired places.
There's a tale told about this Co-
umbia boy, who is doing the first ex-
ensive traveling of his life during
his Michigan trip, that concerns
hat time in his youth when he was
camper at Wah-Ke-Nah, in New
Iampshire.
And the essence of the story is
his: his awkward display of han-
ling the ball while playing third
ase was only exceeded by his nifty
ittle prank of stealing second bas
with the bases loaded.
The awkward display at third bas
ame with a particularly hard hi
all. In the process of fielding that
ball he tangled his legs to such an
xtent that when he came down t
arth he spiked himself.
TO HOLD TOURNAMENTS
The Michigan Union billard room
,nnounced five tournaments wil
pen soon for all interested-One in
Ping pong, one in three cushion bil
iards, one in billiards and a class A
and Class B pocket pool tournament

System Contro rersy Is Bunk;
Good Personnel Wins --Little
Columbia Mentor Defends even passing once. Systems, bah!"
Someone suggested that Michigan's
Fundamental Grid Plays; attack lacked deception. Here Coach
Cites Exam les Kopf took up the, issue. "Michigan
P has the same formations as Minne-
B NLISAGORsota, the same laterals and reverses.
By IRVIN AThey don't seem to use them? In
Three newspapermen barged into that case our scouts must have map-
the Columbia dressing room yester- ped the plays themselves."
day, just as the Lions were washing Kipke's name and present precar-
away Stadium sod after a spirited ious position was unavoidably men-
drill, sought out Coach Lou Little and tioned. "A couple of years ago," Lit-
immediately posed the wrong ques- tle commented, "Yale wanted Kipke
tion. the worst way. He was considered'
"Expect an easy battle?" repeated one of the greatest coaches in the
the Columbia mentor with an amused game."
expression on his face. "You boys Kipke Still Tops
trying to take me for a ride. Why, He paused as someone asked if Yale
we'd have tough going against Ypsi- would still want him. "I don't see
lanti Normal." "We're evenly why not," was his brusque retort.
matched," he added. "A break will "Listen, fellows," Little continued,
probably decide the game. Easy, "Any team with a fundamentally
ha! We'll be lucky to win that one." sound system can win ball games,
Little Is Pssimistic with boys out there who can execute

r

I
s
-
y
e
t'
t
S
V
S
Y
n
-
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t.

be exercising a! those fundamentals." Curtly, that

Little seemed to

FJG GXGl U101118 CL

coach's prerogative of waxing pessi-
mistic before a big game. Assistant
Coach Kopf added another lavender
note when he interposed, "We have
the lightest squad in years.eLuck-
man, our running back, weighs 186
pounds and he's heavier than any
other back on the team. Only two,

men in the line tip the
more than 180."

beams at

Then someone unhappily broached
the explosive subject of systems, and'
everyone chimed in with an opinion.}
"This talk about systems is all
wrong," Little noted. "No matter
what kind of a system you have, or
1 how good your coach is, if your per-
sonnel can't execute the plays, you
can't win."
Had football changed enough to
antiquate Michigan's system?
"Football hasn't changed in the

was Little's grid moral in a nutshell.
As everybody elbowed their way out
of the door, Sam Cordavano, former
Columbia star and pro wrestler, who
is a member of Little's staff, stopped
and aroused more pity for the Lions
when he said: "Boys, Michigan has
played three of the toughest teams
in the country so far. We wouldn't
have a chance against any of them.
Think that over awhile."
Ii Maggio, Lazzeri
Await Series Checks
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 23.-(ff')-
Joe Di Maggio ejaculated "Hot dog!"
and Tony Lazzeri said "Ho, hum"
when told today checks for their
shares "of the World Series money
were in the mail.
The two New York Yankee stars in-
tend to do the same thing with the

last three years," Little answered. $64U5 a h Will reciv --pu i i
"Notre Dame's style of play hasn't the bank.
been altered, yet Elmer Layden seems "My banker will provide a nice
to be doing all right with his men. home for that money," laughed young
Laterals Don't Win Di Maggio.
"Razzle-dazzle, eh! Ohio State
features such stuff and look at them BATTLE CREEK WINS
They started throwing the ball around Battle Creek, scoring on a long pass
in their backfield on Northwestern's in the second period, fought off a
3-yard line and fumbled, losing final- belated Ann Arbor rally in the late
ly. Pittsburgh dropped them using the stages of the game to down Ann
straightest kind of attack, without Arbor, 6-2, at Wines Field .last night.
c24uie467/T"

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