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October 20, 1936 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-10-20

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, OCT. 20, 1936

RAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, OCT. 20, 1936
s~ I

Prof. Weaver
To Give Talk
Before Players
Hillel Group Announces
Sichedule Of Activities
For Coming Season
Prof. Bennett Weaver of the Eng-
lish department will speak on
"Shakespeare in the Modern
Theatre" at the first open meeting
of the Hillel Players at 7:30 p.m.,
tomorrow at the Hillel Foundation,
Louise Samek, '38, president of the
players, announced yesterday.
The announcement was part of the
committee reports at the first meet-
ing of the Hillel Council, yesterday.
Reports were received from the chair-
men of the various committees on
the plans for the coming year, S.
Leonard Kasle, '38, chairman of the
council said.
Following Professor Weaver's talk
at the player's meeting, the names
and dates of casting for the first
group of plays to be presented in
December will be announced, Miss
Samek said. The full three-act play
to be given next March will also be
discussed, she said.
The officers and committee heads
of the Hillel Players for the coming
year are: Margaret Merkel, '37, sec-
retary; Louis Goldberg, '37, business
manager; Louise Ogens, '39, and Sum-
ner Willens, '38, co-chairmen of the
production committee; Norman Kiel,
'39, chairman of the playreading
committee; and Edwin Kessler, '38,
chairman of the publicity commit-
tee.
The chairman of the finance com-
mittee will be chosen at the meeting
tomorrow, Miss Samek said.
The first of a series of bi-monthly
symphony hours, consisting of a
group of recordings, will be presented
this Sunday from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.
at the Foundation, Stuart Hirshberg,
'38, chairman of the music committee
reported. Leo Luskin, Grad., will in-
troduce the program, which will be
continued on alternate Sundays.
Bernard Rubiner, '39, chairman of
the religious committee, announced
that the traditional Sabbath services
will be held at the Foundation at 8
p.m. every Friday. Abe Goldman, '37,
will officiate as cantor, he said.
Plans for a formal dance before
Christmas were presented by Ruth
Brownstein, '37, and Arnold Morri-
son, '38, co-chairman of the social
committee. Dec. 5 was set as the
tentative date.
The members of the various com-
mittees will be chosen by the chair-
men this week, Kasle said.
31 Acts On Band's
Amateur Program
(Continued from Page 1)
lowing order: Everett Doran, '40, pi-
ano; Ralph Harwood, tenor; Robert
Dewitt, accordian; Verna Rae Both-
well, '38; Ardis Fox, '40, tap-dancer;
Casey Carter, '40, guitar and song;
Allen Braun, '40, impersonator; Ber-
nard Alder, '39, baritone; Harry Mar-
tin, '40, cornet; Dorothy Schulte, so-
prano; Sheldon Finkelstein, '40,
dancer; Charles Reugnits, Grad.,
baritone; Bosen Dexter, '39, ukelele,
and William Jones, who will appar-
ently by the Major's echo on the gong.
Bingham Will Sing
Bill Anderson, '38, and Jack Bulk-
ely, '39, accordian and tap-dance;
Barbara Teall, '39, and Barbara
Strand, '37, duo; Sue Willard, ac-
companist; Dick Fuller, '39, panto-
mime; Harrison Williams, '37, bari-
tone; Eldor Pflughoeft, '40, flute;
Paul Schulte, '40, baritone and whist-

ler, Betty Bingham, '37, Janet Al-
lington, '38, and Nancy Gzowski, '38,
trio; James Lerchen, '39, baritone;
Jay W. Sorge, '39, impersonator; Ira
Pfeifle, Building and Grounds, ten-
or; William Gibson, '39, trombone;
Jack Prior, '39, cornet; Steve Alaimo,
'37, baritone; Five Foolish Freshmen,
'40, human calliope; Ross. Stagnitto,
'40, baritone; Walter Schaefer, '37,
gaucho; and Jean Seely, '36, Harriet
Shackleton '38, and Jane Garnet,
Grad, trio.

Prof. Schoeninaun Will Study
Wild- Land Utilization Problern
Uses Of Michigan's Twenty forest ownership, create almost ideal
i i o n Unserviceable conditions for the work of the
Charles Lathrop Pack Professor of
Acres BeingConsidered Wild Land Utilization.
Speaking at the recent land-use
By WILLIAM R. SIZEMORE conference in Marquette, Profes-
How can Michigan's 20,000,000 sor Schoenmann stated that it is,
acres of wildland be brought into important to determine where and
serviceable use is a question which how much land in Michigan we can
has puzzled State conservation lead- devote to parks, intensive recrea-
ers for the last quarter century. Prof. tional use, wild life, forestry (fed-
L. R. Schoenmann of the forestry eral, state and private) mining, and
School, will undertake 'this problem. farming. Once this has been de-
The purposes of the work are to cided, it is necessary to find out where
and how these tried and true uses
determine the basic principles which can be seated into place in a pattern
underlie the intelligent use of wild- of mutual association and support.
lands. One of the first steps is the Professor Schoenmann, who comes
development of means of evaluating to the University from Tennessee
the different ways in which wild-land Valley Authority was born in Sauk
can be used with satisfaction or pro- County, Wis., and received his college
fit. Professor Schoenmann declared education A the University of Wis-
that his problem is not only the mere cain am the riofis
consin. Among the organizations
placing of a value on commercial 'with which he has worked are: U. S.
returns from land, but includes eval- D. A. Bureau of Soils, American'
uating the worth of services that may Rural Planning Association and Na-
otherwise be derived from the land tional Land Colonization Company.
as well.
The work, which is being carried
on under the Charles Lathrop Pack
professorship, represents an expan-
sion of the George Willis Pack For-
estry Foundation which has been
carried on by Prof. Willet F. Rams-
dell since its establishment in 1930.
Professor Ramsdell has been engaged
in research on forest land manage-
ment and the present work is expect-
ed to employ much of the informa-
tion gained through his investiga-
tions.
According to Professor Schoeil,
mann, the ready accessibility of large
areas of wild lands in close proximity
to an exceptionally large and varied
market for wood products and to
millions of people seeking opportuni-
ties for outdoor recreation, together
with the liberal representation of
state and federal as well as private

Stud ent Workers
Federation Meets
(Continued from Page 1)
ward to a bigger and better organiza-
tion this year. By the time organiza-
tion had been completed last year,
summer vacation interrupted the
plans. All students interested are in-
vited to the meeting tonight, whether
members or not. The Federation is
closed to no race, color, sex, or creed,
the constitution states. A score of
women students are members.
A grievance committee formed last
semester received complaints from
various work places on the campus,
with restaurants coming in for most
of the dissatsifaction, as eating estab-
lishments employ a greater number of
students than any other business. An
investigation sponsored by the or-
ganization revealed some places pay-
ing the employee as low as 17 cents
an hour in food.
While most campus working places
are fair in their treatment of student
labor, there are a few instances in
which the group can do much to bet-
ter condtions, it is the belief of Fed-I
eration officials.

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
ety of Mechanical Engineers will hold
its second meeting of the year Wed-
nesday evening, Oct. 21, at 7:30 in
the Michigan Union. Dean Alfred
Lovell will speak on important ,fea-
tures of the recent Washington World
Power Conference.
Mimes: There will be a meeting for
all Mimes members and all students
interested in writing a book or music
for a Union Opera, at the Union,
Wednesday afternoon, Oct. 21 at 4:30
p.m. The room number will be post-
ed on the bulletin board at the Union.
Hillel ping-pong tournament be-
gins Wednesday. All wishing to join
MAIL YOUR ROLLS TO
FILM CENTER OF THE WORLD
Your roll developed and printed. Velox
deckle-edge prints, 25c coin. Also 5 x 7
de luxe enlargement coupon free. One-
day service. Photo Finishing Shop. Inc.,
Est. 22 years. 437 Genesee Valley Trust
Bldg. Rochester, N.Y. 'The Camera City'

call Brut Levin at 8741. Tournament Department will speak on the topic
prize given. "Shakespeare in the Modern
________Theatre."
Hillel Players will hold an open All students interested in the vari-
meeting on Wednesday, Oct. 21 at ous fields of the organization are in-
7:30 p.m. at the Hillel Foundation. vited to be present.
Prof. Bennett Weaver of the English Members are urged to attend.
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