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October 11, 1936 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MI-CHICGAN DAILY

0

Ohio State Loses To Pittsburgh's Old-Fashioned'Footbt

all, 6-0

U~~

Attack Late In
Fourth Period
Causes Defeat
Pitt's Hopes For National
Chanpion'hip Raised As
Result OfVictory
COLUMBUS, O., Oct. 10.-(P)-By
the exclusive and convincing use of
"old-fashioned" football, Pittsburgh's
Panthers overpowered Ohio State to-
day, 6 to 0, and took the high-road
leading toward national champion-
ship heights.
The climax to a hard-fought battle
between two stalwart lines came sud-
denly and with dramatic swiftness
late in the fourth period as Ohio
State's otherwise resourceful defense
finally yielded to the sustained forc-
ing tactics of the hard-charging
Panthers.
Harold Stebbins, Williamsport, Pa.,
backfield substitute, shook loose on
a simple off-tackle play. A poor punt
into the wind by "Tippy" Dye, Ohio's
quarterback, had given Pitt posses-
sion of the ball deep in opposing ter-
ritory. Stebbins cut outside tackle
and with the aid of good blocking,
ran wide to elude several tacklers
and completed his 34-yard scoring
dash down the sidelines untouched.
Panthers Dominate Completely
A near-capacity crowd of 71,714
in Ohio's huge double-decked horse-
shoe stadium, including the Repub-
lican presidential nominee, Gov. Alf
M. Landon, saw Pittsburgh smash
convincingly this year's national
championship hopes of the battling
Buckeyes.
The Panthers, without so much as
attempting a single forward or la-
teral pass of any description, domi-
nated the play from start to finish.
Sticking to orthodox attacking meth-
ods, employing nothing but straight
"Warner system" power tactics, Pitt
registered 11 first downs to Ohio's
five and rolled up a margin in rush-
ing of 251 yards to 77.
It was the most conspicuous vic-
tory for unadulterated, fundamental
methods of offense witnessed in
many a moon and noteworthy par-
ticularly for the thoroughness with
which Pittsburgh smothered the her-
alded "razzle dazzle" attack of the
Buckeyes.,
O.S.U.'s Offense Fails
Ohio's offense, built upon laterals
and trick stuff, simply never had a
chance. The Bucks were only inside
Pitt's territory once and not for long,
Pittsburgh's margin of superiority,
in the main departments of offense
and defense, was more decisive"than
the score indicated.
Twice the Panthers were within
five yards of increasing their score.
Their first big chance bogged down
when Ohio took the ball on downs,
'nding a 55-yard Panther march at
the start of the second period. The
game ended with Pitt driving hard
for a second touchdown and the ball
on Ohio's four-yard stripe.

S.M.U. Mustangs
Dropped B Rams
NEW YORK, N. Y., Oct. 10.-(P)-
That razzle-dazzle, flying circus
from Southern Methodist University
backfired just once here today and
the Fordham Rams, hailed as one
of the East's outstanding team,
evened up for the trouncing the
Methodists gave them two years ago
by walking off with a 7-0 victory.
John Lock, a substitute Ram back,
was the No. 1 hero. While a crowd
of 30,000 rose and cheered, Lock
snagged a Mustang pass midway in
the fourth period, tucked the pigskin
under his arm and galloped 77 yards
down the field like a frightened rab-
bit for the game's only touchdown.
Andy Palau added the extra point.
Fordham turned back the first of
the major threats on its 1936 sched-
ule with only one first down.
Brown Jug Features
Next Saturday's Tilt
With Gopher Eleven
The "Little Brown Jug" again en-
ters Michigan's gridiron spotlight
since the Wolverines open their road
season next Saturday at Minneapolis,
Minn., w.here they are scheduled to
meet the powerful Minnesota Goph-
ers, undefeated for the past three
years.
For those that are not acquainted
with the meaning of the "little brown
jug" it has been symbolic of the tra-
ditional rivalry between the Wolver-
ines and the Gophers for the past 32
years, dating as far back, as 1903
when Fielding H. Yost, present ath-
letic director, was gaining national
recgnition for his famous point-a-
minute teams. During that time the
opposing team carried their own
water, thus the beginning of the
"brown jug" tradition, which allowed
the winner to take the jug home.
The jug stands three feet high and
on it is printed all of the Michigan-
Minnesota scores since 1903.
For the past two years the jug has
been safely tucked away in the Min-
nesota quarters, since the Gophers
rai roughshod over the Wolverines
in 1934, 34-0 and last year, 40-0. In
beating Washington, 14 to 7, in their
season's opener and then making it
two straight with yesterday's last
minute victory over Nebraska, 7-0,
Minnesota has defeated two of the
country's strongest teams. Washing-
ton is rated as one of the favorites
to take the Pacific Coast title while
Nebraska, last year's Big Six cham-
pions, are already being picked to
beat Pittsburgh, conquerors of Ohio
State, and gain the Rose Bowl bid.
There is no doubt that the Wolver-
ines are in for a tough afternoon.
The last time the jug was in Mich-
igan's possession was in 1932 when a
field goal by Harry Newman, All-
American quarterback, beat Minne-
sota, 3-0.
WAR ADMIRAL FAILS
LAUREL, Md., Oct. 10.-()-War
Admiral, S. D. Riddle's likely Man
O'War colt lost Johnson handicap.

Incomplete Passes And Fumbles Tell
I Story Of How Indians Beat Michigan
Ind. Mich. Indiana scoring: Touchdowns, Dal Vanderwater, Heikinen, Brennan
Down ....................6 4 Sasso, Kenderdine. Points from try Ziem. Center: J. Jordan.
Yds. gained rushing . . . ..120 110 after touchdown, Miller 2 (place- Referee: Frank Birch (Earlham);
Forward passes attempted . 9 17 ment). Umpire: Dr. E. P. Maxwell (Ohio
Forward passes completed.. 2 2 TXinl...cr " State). Field judge Lee Daniels

,
s

Ypsi Hurons Bow
To Bowling Green
BOWLING GREEN, O., Oct. 10.-
(,") - Bowling Green University
squelched every scoring attempt by
the Michigan Normal football team
today and emerged victorious, 6-0.
The Ohioan's marker came mid-
way in the first period . on a for-
ward lateral from midfield. The Hu-
ron left tackle, Mayfield, blocked
the try for ektra point.
The Ypsilanti boys threatened to
score several times in the second and
third periods, but Bowling Green
stopped their rushes. Once the Hu-
rons fumbled at the one-yard line.

FOOTBALL GITTERS
DONORA, Pa., Oct. 10.-(iP)-Dr. J.
Add Sprowls died today while listen-
ing to the Pitt-Ohio game today.
~i

LITTLE
THINGS

Forward passes intercepted
by ......................
Yards by forward passing ..
Lateral passes attempted ...
Lateral passes completed..
Yards by lateral passes ..
Punting av., scrim. ......
x Totals yds. kicks ret'd ...
Opponents fumbles re'd ....
Yards lost by penalty .....
x-includes punts and kicko
Score By Periods
Indiana ............0 14
Michigan ...........3 0

Misgan scoring: arlaygoal,Ever
hards (ub fr Brcly).

1 2 IndianaH substitutions: Quarter-
26 2
2 21 backs, Anderson. Halfbacks, Fox,
0 1 Whitman. Gunning, Norton, Cava-
0 -1 cini, Oliver. Fullbacks, Graham.
34 40 Ends: Openchain, Widaman. Tackles:
.114 116 Zoll, Brown, Haak. Guards: Risher,
4 2 Olmstead, Wunsch, Szabo. Centers:
45 0 Sloss, Weiss.
4ff5 Michigan substitutions: Quarter-
back: Levine. Halfbacks: Everhard-
us, Phillips, Ritchie, Campbell. Full-
backs: Stanton, Farmer. Ends:
0 0-14 Smick, Gedeon, Loiko. Tackles:

(Loyola). Head linesman: J. J. Lipp
(Chicago).
The lineups:

Indiana (14)
Kenderdine
Livingston
Gileo
Miller
Sirtosky
Dal Sasso
Beasley
Huffman
Cherry
Eads
Fowler

pos.
LE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
QB
LH
RH
FB

Michigan (3)
Patanelli
Janke:
Garber
Rinaldi
Marzonie
F, Jordan
Valpey
Barclay
Cooper1
Smithers
Sweet

May make
Difference
su I ts-We
tain our
Standards.

a Big
in Re-
main-
High

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