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October 10, 1936 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OCT. 10, 1936

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

"The PRESS ANCLE
By GEORGE J. ANDROS
A Real Column
BEFORE VERY LONG SOMEONE is going to accuse me of doing a good
job of getting out of the task of writing a column every day. Maybe
there will be some truth in the accusation. But right now I couldn't write a
decent pre-game piece if my job depended upon it.
For just as I sat down to write a few minutes ago I happened to glance
at the sports section of Friday's Detroit Times. And when I had finished
reading editor Bud Shaver's "SHAVINGS," I knew there would be no
original "Press Angle" today. Here is a sport column that would make
anything I could turn out look silly. And coming at a time like this nothing
could be more appropriate. Our kindest thanks to Mr. Shaver for permission
to reprint his piece in The Daily.

To Get Chance Today

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*

Coaches Stay Late
A RED SUN toppled off the purple parapet of Michigan's stadium and left
a few golden islands floating in the western sky.
The last Michigan football player long since had crunched across the
cinder path and disappeared in the field house, to crack off his mud en-
crusted football armor and wash away his weariness in a warm shower.
But in the gathering gloom on Ferry Field one little group of men in
football uniforms remained. They were huddled on the sod talking earnestly
in low tones. So long did they remain in the huddle that all but two or three
of the reporters waiting to talk to them tired of waiting and slipped away
into the darkness.
The men in the huddle were Michigan coaches, not Michigan players.
When the conference finally broke up one of the reporters chided them:
"If you coaches take that long in a huddle, what can you expect of a quar-
terpack?"
It's Work For The Coach
HMARRY kIPKE grinned and began scribbling more pencil marks on the
thigh of his pants, an area already completely filled with old pencil
marks-names, circles and crosses, the field blackboard of the Michigan
coaching staff.
One by one he dished out little morsels of news to the reporters, until
satisfied and in fear of cold dinners they left. Alone, Kipke crossed the
cinder path into the field house and sat down wearily on the bench in
front of the locker room.
Watching him, one realized that whatever college football may be to
the players it is much more than a game to a coach. It is a pity that such
a fine game as football should reward its makers with so small a portion
of joy and so great a.portion of mental agony.
Worry Is Their Lot
TT IS THE SAME whether a winning team or a losing one. If Michigan
had opened its. season with a victory over Michigan State instead of
a defeat, the scene on Ferry Field nightly would be the same.
I have seen Kipke both as a winning coach and a losing one and he is the
same during those days and nights preceding a game. What is true of
Kipke is true of all coaches if they are worth their salt. Gus Dorais of
Detroit winds up every season as gaunt as a ghost and even such a husky
citizen as Charley Bachman of Michigan State is scarred with the marks'
of intense mental effort and agony.
One has to care a lot for football and for winning to be a successful
coach; and that means worry from one Saturday to the next. Good coaches
worry because they are alive to their immense responsibilities. No game in
sports demands as much of the man on the sidelines as football.
Indiana Game Is Typical
MICHIGAN'S GAME with Indiana tomorrow presents a typical example.
It is Michigan's first Big Ten game of the season. It comes the week
following a disappointing defeat at the hands of Michigan State-disap-
pointing to Michigan, that is. It was no disappointment to State.
Michigan beat Indiana last year only through a lucky break. Indiana
was much like Michigan must have been against State, Saturday, a team
with all the tools but still unaccustomed and awkward in their use.
The Indiana team which Bo McMillin brought to Ann Arbor last year
had one of the best offenses I saw all season, but erred in execution. The
Hoosiers just didn't click that early.
Hoosiers Are Determined
THE INDIANA team which comes to Ann Arbor tomorrow is not likely to
make the same mistakes as its predecessor. It is more experienced, more
accustomed to the McMillin brand of strategy. It also is impelled by a
fierce desire to wipe out last year's defeat.
That presents a special problem for the Michigan coaches. They not
only must school the Wolverines in new plays and new defenses, correct
the mistakes and plug the weaknesses disclosed in the State game, but give
the team something which will make them forget the initial setback and
arouse them for the new contest.
So much stress is placed on proper mental attitude in football that often
I have resolved to find out what it is and how it is acquired.
It is probably nothing more than a will to win, born of confidence, a
feeling of competency to cope with whatever football problem is presented
on the playing field.
Produced By Hard Work
THAT FEELING is not built up by pep talks, inspirational messages
scrawled on the blackboard, harangues in the locker room between
halves, or least of all by newspaper columns such as this.
Its only source, probably, is in the sweaty, hard work on the practice field,
especially in the most gruelling test of all, scrimmage practice. Teach a boy
how to knock another boy down and make some forward progress and you
give him a feeling of competency which sends him out on the field with some
elation and spirit.
Give a whole squad of them some plays which actual practice has shown
them will work and you have a football team which has all the proper
niental attitude it needs.
That is exactly what was occurring at Ferry Field yesterday. Some
changes had to be made here and there. Allowances had to be made for boys
who were hurt or lame. But the squad as a whole walked off the field with
a feeling that it not only could stop Indiana's plays, but could make some of
its own which Indiana wouldn't stop.
And that is why the coaches were in huddle, until after dark, brewing
more of the same kind of medicine. They do the worrying so the boys can
do the playing.

Indiana Seeks
To Avenge Loss
In Game Today
Confident Wolverines Air
At Initial Victory; Kipke
Undecided On Lineup
(Continued from Page 1)
utation as a passer and his bullet
heaves are feared by every Indiana
opponent. Most of the Wolverines'
drill yesterday, which was carried on
in Yost Field House because of the
rain, was on pass defense and the
Varsity had little trouble stopping the
Hoosier plays as demonstrated by a
picked freshman eleven.
Kipke has used several backfield
combinations in drill this week and as
a result it is expected that there may
be numerous substitutions in the
Michigan lineup. Ritchie, Everhard-
us, Phillips, Hook, Stanton and Cur-
ren are all ready to prove that the
1936 Wolverines are just as strong as
pre-season dope made them appear
and are anxious to use Indiana as
the proving ground.
This will be the 10th meeting be-
tween Indiana and Michigan and
only once have the Hoosiers been able
to come out on the long end of the
score. This was in 1928 when In-
diana won, 6-0.. On every other oc-
casion Michigan has shut out the
Hoosiers, doing so last year when
Patanelli recovered a fumble punt in
the end zone for the only touchdown
of the game.
Trainer Ray Roberts stated yester-
day that all three of the injured regu-
lars, Patanelli, Cooper and Smithers,
are in condition to play although
some fear is felt over the captain's
power in lasting the full game. The
Michigan squad spent last night in
Plymouth while the Hoosiers stayed
in Ypsilanti, neither team returning
to the battle front until after noon
today.
It is expected that with favorable
weather today's crowd will number
approximately 30,000.
Tentative Lineups
Referee: Frank Birch (Earlham);
Umpire: Dr. E. P. Maxwell (Ohio

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CHECK YOUR TOPCOAT
TOPCOAT WEATHER heralded by these first cool mornings and evenings is
here. Taking their fashion cue from suit models, topcoats swing to the more
formal side. The model pictured below left in a deep herring-bone weave is an
example. Topcoats, by the way, are on the short side coming just to the knee
or a fraction below. Notice also the other models, a necessity for the college
man's wardrobe.

-Associated Press Photo.
Big Danny Smick, 6 feet 4 inches
tall and weighing 198 pounds, of
Hazel Park, Mich., is bound to see
a lot of action against Indiana to-
day. Smick will either start the
game or enter as a substitute for
the ailing Captain Matt Patanelli.
Ann Arbor And
Ferndale Hivh
Battle To Tie'
Ann Arbor High School last night
dedicated its newly-lighted football
field by playing to a 6 to 6 tie with
Lincoln High of Ferndale.
The local Pioneers scored first,
early in the opening period. Fern-
dale received the kickoff and after
two plays !,Tank Bulman, Ferndale
quarterback, kicked from his 25-yard
line to Lew Kalb on the Ann Arbor
26. Emerging from a pile-up with
only Bulman ahead of him, Kalb
scored behind aebeautifulblock by
Norm Grob. Koernke failed to kick
the point.
Midway in the second period Fern-
dale, taking the ball on their own
20 after Koernke had drop-kicked
over the goal-line in a field-goal at-
tempt, launched a touchdown march
with a 40-yard run by Don Allen.
Burt, Ferndale halfback, took the
ball the remaining 40 yards in five
plunges. Neustadt broke through to
block the try for the winning point.
An outstanding feature of the game
was the excellent punting of Max
Peet, Ann Arbor fullback.

Left: The double-breasted top-
coat shown here is made of black
and white herring-bone shetland.
It carries out the important trend
to formal effects.
Right: This peak lapel fly front
coat in Glen plaid is perfectly
adapted for the college man's
campus needs.
Left: Though topcoats may be
waterproofed by the cravenette
process, a raincoat is an essential
for heavy rains. This one is the
traditional macintosh model with
military collar, fly front and easy
shedding raglan sleeves.
Right: The belted raincoat in
double-breasted model gives a
touch of the military with an as-
surance of full protection in its
convertible collar and storm tab
sleeves.
WATCH FOR NEXT SATURDAY'S

.iP..
jit
., y :...
v::

State); Field J
(Loyola); Head I
(Chicago).
Game time: 2
Stadium.
Michigan
Patanelli, C I
JankeI
Brennan or
GarberI
Rinaldi
Marzonid
F. Jordan, Luby
or Lincoln F
ValpeyI
Barclay or
LevineG
SmithersI
CooperF
Sweet

Judge: Lee Daniels
Linesman: J. J. Lipp
p.m. in Michigan

LE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
RE
QB
LH
RH
FB

Indiana
Beasley
C, Dal Sasso
Dileo
Miller
Sirtoskey
Livingston
Kenderdine

A tlmt l

7 woa 4

Huffman
Cherry
Eads
Graham

-
ANNUAL FALL SALE
Of Modern Gas Ranges

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Teamwork May Turn Tide
For Kipke's Warriors Today

By FRED WARNER NEAL I
A lot is written and a lot more is
said about unity of purpose and co-
operation. And it can be written
and said today about Michigan's foot-
ball team.
It's not exactly spirit Coach Harry
G. Kipke was talking about as he
and his boys prepared to leave for
Plymouth last night to rest for the;
battle with Indiana this afternoon.
True, he said with a grin that "they.,
showed a lot of zip" today. But it
was more than that.
"They're working together," he
said. "They all seem to have their
minds on one thing-beating In-
diana." There is no doubt, he de-
clared, that with the new arrange-
ment (the shift in line-up) things
are going and will go much smoother.
Kipke, his slouch hat dripping rain
as he entered the Union, looked like
a man who thinks he should be con-
fident but doesn't quite dare. As
Patanelli, limping slightly, Valpey,
Sweet, the entire team trooped in one
after another, all with light-hearted
faces, Kipke grinned.
"Think you'll win tomorrow, Kip?"
he was asked.
Kipke half shook his head, smiled,

and said slowly: "I feel pretty good."
But he went on in a serious vein
to say that tomorrow will be a fight
to the last ditch. That he was cer-
tain that as far as ability to scrap
goes, his boys have what it takes.
And you gathered that the some-
thing that last week made for con-
fusion, maybe it was lack of leader-
ship of some sort or other, had been
remedied.
H. E. PH ILP
ALL KINDS OF
TAILORING
Main Street
OVER CAHOW'S DRUG STORE

U

I

DON'S BAR-B-Q
514 East Williams
BEFORE & AFTER GAME
Bar-B-Q Beef Dinner . . 45c
Bar-B-Q Sandwich .... 15c
Home Made Pie
BEST COFFEE IN TOWN

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is 1

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Brown Bomber Puts
Away Brescia In Third
NEW YORK, Oct. 9.--(A)-Jorge
Brescia was just another chopping
block for Joe Louis tonight. The
Bomber blasted the Argentine out of
the heavyweight picture with a
knockout in the third round of their
ten round bout in the New York Hip-
podrome.
It was a typical Louis finish. Joe
fooled around just long enough to
;et his bearings before uncorking two
paralyzing left hand belts to the
head.

ARCHERY FANS MEET
There will be an organization
meeting for all men students in-
terested in archery at 4 p.m. Tues-
day. Oct. 13 in the student oice
of the Intramural Sports Building.

ods
WAS Be!

MODERN ROPER GAS RANGE
$75.50 Selling Price
$20.00 Old Stove Allowance
$55950 Plus Tax, Installed

$1.75 Down

2 4 MONTHS TO PAY
THE BALANCE

STROH'S
PABST BLUE RIBBON
FRIAR'S ALE
At All Dealers
J. J. O'KANE, Dist. Dial 35

What Foi

500OO

I These Morse

TRY HEALTHFUL FLAVOR-SEAL WATERLESS COOKING
IT'S EASY WITH THE NEW TYPE SURFACE BURNERS
Use as little or as much water as you prefer in the cooking of vegetables, and if you

Ij -

' I!

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