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October 09, 1936 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-10-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX
Dr. Bell Issues
Warning To All
Cold Sufferers
Students Urged To Care
For Colds And To Help
PreventEpidemic
A warning that the unpopular but
ever present Ann Arbor autumn cold
has taken an even heavier toll than
usual and that special precautions
should be taken for cold prevention
was issued yesterday by Dr. Mar-
garet Bell of the Health Service.
Many of the dormitories and sor-
ority houses have cooperated with
the Health Service in an attempt to
check the spread of colds, but unless
an effort is made by the entire stu-
dent body there appears to be little
hope of progress, Dr. Bell added.
The Unversity medlical staff,
Health Service officials said, gave 3,-
550 complete physical examinations
including X-rays during the first
week of school. The practice of giv-
ing exams is credited by the Health
Service with aiding materially in pro-
tecting the health of the student body
in general. Two thousand three hun-
dred and seventy four men and 1,360
women were examined, in addition to
the 305 students of the University
High School.
Particular attention is paid to the
X-ray pictures taken, officials said,
and several staff members are work-
ing on each case, recording various
findings and comparing notes.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
Field. Any registered student of the
University is eligible for competition.
R.O.T.C. Measurements for Basic
and Advanced course uniforms will
be taken today between 8:30 a.m. and
5 p.m.
R.O.T.C. Rifle Team: All old mem-
bers are requested to attend a meet-
ing in the R.O.T.C. Drill Hall today
at 4 p.m.
Greek Students: All Greek students
of Hellenic descent who are interest-
ed in joining a Greek Fraternity, will
please attend a meeting to be held
tonight at the Michigan Union at 8
p.m.
It is very necessary that all mem-
bers be present at this special meet-
ing.
Crop and Saddle Tryouts: Any
woman student wishing to try out
for this riding club should get in
touch first with Eleanor French
(phone 7117) and meet at Barbour
Gymnasium either at 2 or 3 p.m.
today.
A medical recheck is necessary for
all students not having had a medi-
cal examination at the beginning of
the semester.
Stalker Hall: Tonight at 8:30 p.m.
at Stalker Hall, there will be a Sca-
venger Hunt. Come prepared for
the great hunt. Refreshments will
be served for a small charge.
Congregational Students and their
friends are invited to a party in the
parlors of the Congregational Church,
this evening. Dancing from 9 to
12 p.m. Music furnished by Ray
Carry and his orchestra.

Presbyterian Students and Their
Friends: The Westminster Guild will
hold an "Indiana" Rally dance to-
night from 9-1 at the Masonic
Temple, South Ferry near William.
Raymond Carry's orchestra will play
for the occasion. Refreshments will
be served. A small charge will be
made per person.
Baptist Guild: Members of the
Roger Williams Guild and their
friends will go on a hike beginning at
5 p.m. today. The group will meet
at the guild house, 503 E. Huron St.,
and those wishing to attend are asked
to call 7332. In case of rain, a party
will be held in the house. All stu-
dents are welcome.
Coming Events
Economics Club: The first meeting
of the year will be held Monday eve-
ning, Oct. 12, at 7:30 p.m. in Room
304 of the Union. Dr. Ralph L.
Dewey will speak on "The Merchant
Marine and the Act of 1936." Mem-
bers of the staffs in Economics and
Business Administration, and gradu-
ate students in these departments,
are cordially invited to attend.
A.A.U.W. International Relations
Supper: Ballroom, Michigan League,
Sunday, Oct. 11, 6:30 p.m. Dr. Yi
Fang Wu, president of Ginling Col-
lege, Nanking, will speak on "China
I~l aI

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCT. 9, 1936

Chinese Alumna Here

DR. YI-FANG WU
Dr. Yi-Fang Wu
Will Address
Group Tonight
As Chairman Of National
Christian Council, China,
She k Touring World
Dr. Yi-Fang Wu, president of Gin-
ling College in Nanking, China, and
alumna of the University, will open
her program in Ann Arbor with an
address at a union meeting of mis-
sionary interests at 8 p.m. today in
the First Baptist church.
Dr. Wu, who graduated from the
University in 1928, has been giving
addresses in Detroit and other cities
en route from London,' England, and
will open the year's program of the
Ann Arbor branch of the American
Association of University Women
with a talk at its international rela-
tions supper, open to the public, to
be held at 6:30 p.m: Sunday, Oct. 11,
in the ballroom of the Michigan
League.
Her position as an authority on.
missionary work is widely recognized,
in Crisis.' Open to public, Reserva-
tions before 10 a.m. Saturday,
League, 23251.
The Chinese Students will hold a
special meeting to meet Dr. Hu Shih
who will speak informally. Tuesday,I
Oct. 13, 8 p.m. in the Michigan
Union.

Annual Community
Fund Drive Starts
The annual campaign for funds by
the Ann Arbor Community Fund As-
sociation will officially get under way
at a dinner meeting Thursday night
at the Union.
The group will be addressed by
Seward C. Simons, managing direc-
tor of the Flint Community Fund as-
sociation, who will speak on "Why Do
We Need a Community Fund for
1937." Emory J. Hyde, chairman of
the local fund campaign, will also
speak.
Solicitation of $30,000 . of special
gifts has already begun.
and she is chairman of the 'National
Christian Council of China.
.Dr. Wu was deeply interested in
the activities of religious groups dur-
ing her graduate work at the Univer-
sity. She was president of the local
Chinese Students' Christian Associa-
tion and promoted cooperation with
the national group, of whose board
she was for some time an officer. As a
Barbour scholar, Dr. Wu earned a'
record of brilliant achievement.
After receiving her doctor of phi-
losophy degree in zoology here, in
1928, Dr. Wu returned to China and
assumed her duties as president o!
Ginling college for women.
In 1933 she represented the women
of China at the International Con-
gress of Women at Chicago, and was
a member of the Chinese group at
the fifth biennial conference of the
Institute of Pacific Relations held
at Banff, Canada.
Before her return to China that
year, Dr. Wu, with Dr. E. Stanley
Jones and Bishop Logan Roots, con-
ducted a series of foreign mission
conferences in cities of the East and
Mid-West.
As chairman of the National Chris-
tian Council in China, Dr. Wu was
given leave of absence from her of-
fice at Ginling college, to attend a
committee meeting of the council in
London, England, to plan a World
Conference in China in 1938. The
leave was extended and she attended
the Harvard tercentennial celebra-
tion last month. She will speak of
her college and its work before inter-
ested groups along her route from
the east to Victoria, British Columbia.
Dr. Wu will attend the "Double
Ten" dinnerof the Chinese students
of the University which will be held
tomorrow in celebration of the Chi-
nese republic. Her message to this
,group will be of special interest be-
cause of her association with Gen.
and Madame Chiang Kai-Shek. Gen.
Chiang Kai-Shek spoke at the bac-
calaureate service of Ginling College
in 1934.

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