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February 27, 1936 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-02-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, FEBRU,

W

________-_-__-_-------

Y

Prof. Hammett
Gives Talk On
Travel Abroad!
Discusses Details On Tries
In Countries Of Western:
Europe

PoliceWant Head

Three Women
Make Trip For
Purdue Debate
Negative Team Will Meet
Indiana Here Friday On
League Proposition

Talmadge Ousts Georgia State Treasurer After Row

Ticket Fraud Trial
Is Set For Marchi
Among those listed for trial during
the March term of the circuit court,
dockets for which were distributed
yesterday at the county clerk's office,
are Charles Horenstein, Benjamin
Schulmanand Eli Frank, all of De-
troit and charged with larceny.
The charges arose out of their ac-
tivities at the Ohio State football
game when it is alleged that they
stole tickets worth approximately
$300 from the Union desk. Four oth-
er criminal cases are listed for trial
which were not carried over from
the previous term.
A total of 209 cases appear on the
calendar as compared with 205 at

luncheons
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40c and up
dancing tonight
in the hut cellar
8:15 to 10:15
the fingerle the
hut operated hut

The fact that the most common
subject discussed by American tour-{
ists returning from Europe is the
different foods which they have en-
countered in their travels was stated!
by Prof. R. W. Hammett of the Col-
lege of Architecture in a talk given
last night in the Union.
Professor Hammett, speaking on
the subject of "Travel Abroad," gave
a detailed discussion, flavored with
humorous anecdotes taken from his
wide travels on the continent, of the
necessary preparations for travel, of
the ideal itinerary, and of the many
factors which serve to make a trip
enjoyable.
"One's own interests are the first
factors to be taken into consideration
in planning a trip abroad," said the
Professor. The college student, he
pointed out, will do* best to travel
largely in the big cities, since his
time is usually limited, and since it
is there that he can get the clearest
picture of the social life and culture
of the people among whom he is,
travelling. Other motives, he said,
such as an interest in languages, or
even in sports, can help the student
in planning his itinerary.
Names Preparations

-Associated Press Photo.
Pressing to clean up the Bremer
kidnaping case of two years ago,
J. Edgar Hoover, head of the Fed-
eral bureau of investigation, has
itued an "identification order" for
William Elmer Mead (above) in
connection with the case.
May Substitute
Income Tax For
Property Levy,
'Revolutionary Move' Is
Sponsored By State-Wide
Repeal Association

In regard to practical preparations
for the trip, Professor Hammett
pointed out the necessity of having
passports and visas in order. This
done, he said, the problem of bag-
gage is next. Baggage should be as
light as possible, and he .advises do-
ing without a trunk if that is pos-
sible, since the trunk usually results
in long delays at the customs offices.
Perhaps the greatest necessity of
the American travelling in Europe,
said Professor Hammett, is that he
always remember his manners. Ac-
customed to services of all sorts in
America, he said, we take them for
granted in Europe. Professor Ham-
mett demonstrated that nothing but
bad manners is enough to precipitate
an international incident by telling
the story of the unfortunate Amer-
ican who lit a cigarette with a five
franc bill, and was immediately
mobbed by insulted Frenchmen.
"We have an idea," he said, "that
we are 'God's chosen people.' But
since all of the peoples of Europe
have exactly the same idea, we must
accustom ourselves to their manner-
isms, and learn to live by them."
Discusses Forms Of Travel
In discussing different forms of
travel, Professor Hammett explained
that Tourist Class on large liners is
equal to our first class hotels, while
first class on these liners seems to be
styled for "millionaires and royalty."
The trains in Europe, he said, are
classed much the same as ours, and
first and second class are the same
as our Pullman and parlor cars.
The choice of hotels, an all im-
portant factor, he said, is largely a
matter of experience "hotels and
tourist homes in England are gen-

GRAND RAPIDS, Feb. 26. - (iP)
A movement to abolish the general
property tax and substitute a gradu-
ated state income tax, described by
its sponsors as "one of the most
revolutionary tax movements in
Michigan's history," was afoot today.
The movement will be sponsored
by a new organization to be knownI
as the Michigan Property Tax Repeal
Association and one of its immediate
objectives is to avert the impending
state tax sale scheduled for May 5.
Plans for the movement were re-
vealed at a meeting last night by J.
G. Lloyd Alexander, president of the
Grand Rapids Real Estate Associa-
tion. Alexander said the action had
been hastened by the breakdown of
the property tax and the approach-
ing state tax sale. The Michigan Real
Estate Association is not participat-
ing in the movement as an organiza-
tion.
Petitions urging a special session of
the legislature for action to postpone
the tax sale already have been draft-
ed and petitions initiating the consti-
tutional amendment necessary before
a state income tax law can be set up
will be placed in circulation as soon as
their draft has been approved by
legal counsel, Alexander said.
Tax Exemption
Bill Defeated In
House, 172-164

Three whmen representing the
University left last night for Lafay-
ette, Ind., where they will debeate
the Purdue University debating team
tonight.
The women making the trip are.
in the order they will speak, Grace
Kemp Gray, '37, Mary Esther Burns,
'36, Barbara J. Lutts, '36. They were
accompanied by Arthur E. Secord,
Varsity debating coach.
The question of this debate is:
"Resolved: That the United States
Should Support the League of Na-
tions in the Enforcement of Sanctions
Provided for in the Covenant of the
League."
The same proposition will bedebat-
ed at 8 p.m. tomorrow in 1025 An-
gell Hall between Michigan women
and a team from the University of
Indiana. Michigan will uphold the
affirmative side of the question.
The team debating here tomorrow
night is in order of speaking, Kath-
erine Schultz, '39, Lillian Tolhurst,
'38, and Winifred Bell,.'36. In the
case of Miss Schultz, this is the first
time that a freshman woman has
participated in a Big Ten Conference
debate.
The judge of the debate in Lafay-
ette will be Prof. A. D. Huston and
the judge of the local debate will be
Rupert L. Cortright, director of Men's
forensics at Wayne University. In
addition to the judge's decision, there
will be an audience decision at the
debate to be held here tomorrow
night.
Commerce Men
Are Dismissed
By Department
Fire Officials In Shipping
Bureau After Charges Of
'Insubordination'
WASHINGTON, Feb. 26. - W) -
The dismissal of two commerce de-
partment shipping officials "for in-
subordination" was made known to-
day in official quarters which fore-
cast the resignation soon of Joseph
B. Weaver, director of the bureau of
navigation.
Weaver's retirement was expected
to follow on the completion of legis-
lation for sea safety now before Con-
gress.
The two aides who have been dis-
missed are Commander H. McCoy
Jones and Frederick L. Adams. Their
dismissal has not been announced
formally but will be shortly.
The dismissal was attributed to
their refusal to answer questions re-
garding premature release of a re-
port criticizing present ship safe-
guards.
"I'm not going to resign now,"
Weaver said today.
"I'm going to finish my job. I'm
going to put this service in the best
possible shape."
The report which led to the dis-
missals was released to newspapers
without going through the commerce
department's regular publicity chan-
nels.
It was prepared by the depart-
ment's board of supervising inspec-
tors, and it complained of lack of
funds and facilities for inspecting
ships and warned that some ships
were not safe.
Weaver, at the time, was making
a tour of the nation's ports in the
west.
When he returned Weaver recom-
mended to Secretary Roper that
charges against Jones be dismissed,
and that Adams be transferred to
another department.
It has not been disclosed who sent
the report to the newspapers. Com-

merce officials have maintained that
the actual publication was not the
matter in controversy, nor the con-
tents of the report, but simply that
Jones and Adams were "insubordi-
nate."

mi,

the beginning of December.

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-Associated Press Photo.
Carrying out his promise to leave only by force, State Treasurer
George Hamilton of Georgia is shown resisting unsuccessfully the efforts
of Adjutant General Lindley W. Camp (right) and Sergeant H. D.
Blackwell to remove him from his office under order of Gov. Eugene
Talmadge. Hamilton's ouster followed that of W. B. Harrison, comp-
troller general, both of whom balked at signing Talmadge fiscal war-
rants.
Architectural College Displays
Controversial Design Exhibit
0

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Traditionalist, Modernist
Schools Represented On
First-FloorGallery
By ARNOLD S. DANIELS
An exhibit of design submitted in
the Flat Glass Industry Architectural
Competition being conducted by
Pencil Point, are being shown in the
first-floor gallery of the College of
Architecture.
The exhibit, which includes both
conservative and very modern designs
is of particular significance, accord-
ing to Prof. Emil Lorch, of the Col-
lege of Architecture, in view of a con-
troversy between the traditionalist
and modernist schools of architecture
in New York. The present exhibit
offers examples of both schools done
by the country's leading architects.
According to the latest reports,
Professor Lorch says, the modernist
school has "begun a retreat, the tra-
ditionalists a forward movement."
The controversy has been brought to
attention as a result of the current
exhibit of the Architectural League
in New York. Reports byLouis La-
Baume, vice-president of the Ameri-
can Institute of Architects, said Pro-
fessor Lorch, state that for the past
five years, members of the two schools
have been engaging in heated ver-
bal debate, both sides being eloquent
and often logical.
Professor Lorch points out, how-
Gas Leak Fatalities
I o Be IInvestia tcd
DETROIT, Feb. 26.-- (/P -A homi-
cide squad investigation "from the
criminal standpoint" into recent
deaths from gas leaks in the Detroit
area was asked today by Prosecutor
Duncan C. McCrea.
The prosecutor asked Inspector
John I. Navarre, head of the homi-
cide squad, to "report whether there
is any evidence that would warrant,
an inquest or any other criminal
proceedings."
Meanwhile an inquest was set for
Tuesday into the deaths of Fred
Corns and his wife in a gas explo-
sion at River Rouge Feb. 16. It was
requested by an attorney represent-
ing the estate.
Coroner Edmund J. Knobloch said
the inquest will also concern the
deaths of William Beeching, 53, and.
his mother, Mrs. Emma Beeching, 80.
who lived next door to the Corns.
The common council decided Tues-
day to ask the City Gas Co. and water
board for pieces of pipe mains broken
during the recent cold wave, for the
purpose of testing their construction.

ever, that reports of the New York
exhibit indicate that the construc-
tional value of the work of the mod-
ernist school is made clear at the
exhibit. In regard to these examples
of the modernist style, the report
says, "by way of disastrous example
we need look just at the excrutiating
houses that were esteemed the last
word in architectural beauty back in
1887. Things are being done in the
year 1936 that are not quite so bad."
Mr. LaBaume's report states that
a middle course seems the best way
out, but that the result might be an
unfortunate hybrid form. It also
serves to show the uncertainty which
exists at present regarding the value
of the two schools.
It is for this reason, Professor
Lorch stated, that the exhibit here is
of unusual interest. It will, he feels,
give observers an opportunity to
judge between the opposing schools as
represented here by excellent ex-

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erally poor, "he said, but in the WASHINGTON, Feb. 26. - (/P) -
Continent they are excellent." Defeat in the House of an RFC tax
Professor Hammett advised against exemption bill, administration lead-
travelling by automobile, largely be- ers saw only a forlorn chance today
cause he has found that this is too to _recoup the legislative loss.
expensive, especially at the present The House yesterday pnexpectedly
rate of exchange. It also entails long voted down 172 to 164 the bill to
delays at customs offices, he added. exempt from state and local taxation
Lauding a bicycle trip for its inex- bank stocks held by the Reconstruc-
pensiveness, Professor Hammett tion corporation. A similar measure
pointed out that it is not advisable passed the Senate 38 to 28 the day
unless the traveller has a great deal before.
of time at his disposal. The defeat was surprising because
the measure had been unanimously
no. in Wil Stay supported by Republicans and Dem-
- / ocrats on the House Banking Com-
(uaLOf Washinton mittee.
- Democratic leaders said the Sen-
ate-approved measure still could be
DETROIT, Feb. 26. - UP) -- The called up for a vote in the House.

possibility of a meeting in Washing-1
ton between the Rev. Charles E.
Coughlin and Representative John
J. O'Connor (Dem., N.Y.) chairman
of the House Rules Committee, van-
ished today.
At his office here, Father Coughlin,
through a secretary, announced he
"had no intention of going to Wash-'
ington" because representatives of his
lNational Union for Social Justice in
the east had come here for a confer-
ence.
Father Coughlin had charged the,
New York congressman with attempt-
ing to block passage of the Frazier-
Lemke farm bill and O'Connor replied
with a challenge for the priest to
come to Washington and be "kicked"
down Pennsylvania Avenue. Father
Coughlin then announced he would be
in Washington today.

They doubted that this would beI
done however, and indicated the leg-
islation was "dead." Representative
Bankhead, majoirity leader, said "it
looks bad."
Speaker Byrns attributed the de-
feat possibly to "the fact that many
banks throughout the state are in-
volved and the states didn't want
their right of taxation taken away."
The legislation was written after
the Supreme Court held in a Mary-
land bank case that the stocks held
by RFC were subject to taxation.
MILLER GOES TO ADRIAN
Col. Henry W. Miller of the engi-
neering college will speak at a Mich-
igan Alumni banquet to be held today
in Adrian. Several others from the
University will also attend this an-
nual affair.

amples of the works of both.MThe
exhibit will be kept here until Feb.
29.
Banks Limited In
Buzyinug Securities
WASHINGTON, Feb. 26.- )
The comptroller of the currency to-
day prohibited Federal Reserve mem-
ber banks from purchasing specula-
tive securities for their own account.
Acting under authority of the
banking act of 1935, the comptroller
decreed that the purchase of "invest-
ment securities," in which the in-
vestment characteristics are dis-
tinctly or predominantly speculative,
or "investment securities" of a lower
designated standard than those
which are distinctly or predominant-
ly speculative, is prohibited.
The terms employed in designat- F o
ing the securities may be found in
recognized rating manuals, the comp-
troller said, and where thereis doubt Em
as to eligibility of a security for pur-
chase, such eligibility must be sup--
ported by not less than two rating_______________________________
manuals.
The purchase of securities which
are in default, either as to principal
or interest, was also prohibited. I
The order applies to all national
banks and to the 900-odd state banks Phone 3101 416 South 4th Street
which are members of the Federal
Reserve system.
Arriving Daily - Second Semester
TEXT antd
REFERENCE BOOKS
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