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May 30, 1936 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-05-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, MAY 30, 1936

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Woody Malloy Leads Golfers

To

12.5-8.5 Victory Over State

Varsity Takes
Five Matches
Out Of Seven
Bill Barclay, Al Karpinski,
Bill Griffiths Also Win;
MoriartyTies
EAST LANSING, May 29.-(Spe-
cial to The Daily)-Carding a bril-
liant 70 on the difficult Lansing
Country Club course, Woody Malloy
led his University of Michigan team-
mates to a 122 to 82 victory over the
Michigan State team and at the same
time gained revenge for an early sea-
son defeat by trouncing Tommy
Brand 2/2 to 1/2 in the number one
match.
Malloy Replaces Kocsis
Malloy played in the leadoff match
in the absence of the Wolverine cap-
tain, Chuck Koesis, who is taking time
off from collegiate competition to
play in the True Temper tournament
in preparation for the long grind of
the National Open which will be
played on the Baltusrol course in
New York. Brand who had a medal
score of 74 was moved up to the lead-
ing position after his stellar play out-
shone that of Bill Taylor, the only
veteran from last year's squad.
Allan Saunders, moved up to the
number two position, lost his match
to Taylor 1 to 2, carding a 77 to the
Spartan's 76.f
One other match was lost to the
Spartans and another was tied. Emil
Gallan was the second Wolverine
casualty, dropping his match to
Richardson, 0 to 3. Morairty, shoot-
ing a good 76, divided his match with
1endrickson of the Michigan State
team, 12 to 1%.
Barclay Wins
Bill Barclay, playing number three,
and Al Karpinski, playing number
fout, took their matches by a wide
margin. Zimmerman was downed by
Barclay, who shot a 74, by a score of
2 to 1 while Karpinski downed his
opponent, Carl Nosall, 3 to 0.
Bill Griffiths, plying in the num-
ber seven position, took a 2/2 to 2
decision over Silcox of the Spartans
to wind up the final duel match of
the season for the Western Confer-
ence champions.
Summaries :
Malloy (M)defeatedBrand (MS),
21/2to V1.
Taylor (MS) defeated Saunders
(M), 2 to 1.
Barclay (M) defeated Zimmerman
(MS), 2 to 1.
Karpinski (M) defeated Nosall
(MS), 3to 0.
Richardson (MS) defeated Gallan
(M), 3to 0.
Morairty (M) divided with Hend-
rickson (MS), 1 2 to 1%/2.
Griffiths (M) defeated Silcox (MS)
2 to /2.
Michigan Nine
Tops Spartans
in Close Game
(Continued Irom Page 1)
out to center field for a well earned
single.
The hard hitting catcher was re-
tired at second on a fielder's choice
when Irving Bartling hit a bounder
to the Wolverine shortstop. Bartling
advanced to second on Larson's wild
pitch and then scored on Lehnhardt's
single to right field which was bobbled
by Vic Heyliger. Randall ended the
inning grounding to Larson who
threw him out at first.
Heyliger came into his own again
yesterday, connecting for two hits in

three times at bat to lead both teams
for the highest batting average of
the day. Larson, though allowing one
more hit than the Spartan mounds-
man, struck out 11 men to make an!
impressive showing that augered well
for a Wolverine victory in the first of
the Iowa games.
The Michigan captain was on the
spot in the eighth inning after Ran-
dall, red-headed slugger from De-
troit, had singled with a scorching
liner to Carl Ferner, Wolverine third
sacker. Pitching masterful ball, Lar-
son retired three of the next four
batters by the strikeout method, one
of them MacGrain, pinch hitter who
was substituted for Kuhne in that
stanza.
Cornell Sets. Pace
In I.C. 4-A Meet
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., May 29.--OP)
-Cornell's hopes for a team triumph
in the Intercollegiate A.A.A.4. Track
and Field Championships, last won by
the Ithacans in 1919, soared today
when they set the pace in the qualify-
iri.r ria .

The PRESS ANGLE
By GEORGE J. ANDROS

Off To The RacesI
TODAY around breakfast time, that
is if you eat your cereal between
8 and 8:30 a.m., some 175,000 people
in Indianapolis, a town situated on
the banks of White River, a tributary
of the Wabash which flows into theI
beautiful Ohio, are gathering togeth-
er their thermos bottles and swiss1
cheese and ham on rye and depart-
ing for the races. Of course we mean
the 500-mile Speedway race.
Some 50,000 of them are saying,
with a roguish lilt, "Well, I'm off to
the Races." Another 50,000 are try-
ing to finish a poem that begins,
"Decoration Day, Oh Decoration
Day." And another 50,000 are wor-
rying about the mustard; did they
or did they not remember the mus-
tard.
From 8:30 to 8:45 a.m. 40,000
husbands and the corresponding
number of wives indulge in a
heated discussion as to whether
the north Meridian street route
or 30th street via Riverside Park
would be best. Both want to avoid
the crowds. Finally they decide
to go out Kessler Blvd. Actually
it makes little difference, as they
will admit tonight, for one is as
bad as the other.
Traveling at a 15 mile an hour paceI
for the next 45 minutes does the
nerves but little good. Around 9:30
the 40,000 wives and 30,000 girl
friends linger on the brink of hys-
teria as they suddenly realize that,
the starting bomb is but a half hour
off and all 175,000 wonder why in
the name of Allah they didn't start
jat 8:00.1
The next 20 minutes are just a}
jumble of scratched fenders, spilledj
coke bottles, bands, army reserves
and navy reserves and even a few
Boy Scout reserves all trying to tell
their fellow men that they must park
in the infield and that there is no use
arguing.
Then getting into the stands-but
why discuss getting into the stands.
Let's just take it for granted that
every one who has the ducats gets
into his stall.
ON the red brick track below are
33 little bullet-like automobiles.
"Cars" the man in the grandstand
is calling them, "Speedwagons" the
AP man has dubbed them, "Struggle-
buggies" says the smartie hanging
on the infield fence. There they sit
three abreast for about 12 or 13 lines
back of the pagoda.
Mechanics and pit helpers work
feverishly on the motors and one
by one they sputter into life. At
10 a.m. the crowd quiets, then
the terrific booming of the start-
ing bomb, and led by a flashy
touring job, a Cadillac or a Lin-

coin or maybe just a nice Buick,
with Tommy Milton at the ped-
dies, leads the parade. The long
line of cars starts moving . . .
slow, about 60 miles an hour.
Two or three of the little creations
just watch the others pass on as the
mechanics go nuts trying to get them
started. For two months they've1
been tuning these things up so thatt
they will average about 106 miles anz
hour for five hours and now at the
last minute it won't even turn over.
Some 15,000 wits howl, "Watch the1
Fords go by."
Two and a half minutes later the
parade shoots out of the nofth turn,
gets the green flag and starts rolling.
That's when the "Crowd Roars." At
least they say it does so we suppose
that it does.:
For an hour all 175,000 sit thrilled
to the marrow as the boys bunch at
the curves and coast around the quar-
ter mile embankments at 100 miles
an hour then wheel themselves down'
the mile long straightaways at 150.
AROUND 11:00 it gets a little bor-
ing and every one relaxes, dis-
cusses the girl in the light brown
sweater. Time magazine's revelation
on sex in New York City, and "Things
to Come."
Comes 12:00 and lunch in the
infield, another gasp at the
encromous size of the whole
thing; the golf course, landing
field, and 15,000 pleasure cars all
in the center of the oval. The
mustard has soaked through the
rye and somebody put the V-O on
the hard-boiled eggs.
Little knots of people gather around
each of the Duesenbergs, Hispano-
Suizas and Mercedes-Benz. A few
look over the amphibians which have
come up from Florida and the Baby
Blimp from Akron.
Back in the stands at 1:30 p.m. and
a gasp of disbelief to find that the
winner of two years ago is still in
ninth place and that the favorite just
dropped a steering knuckle.
Then that last hour, from 2:00 to
3:00. Thrills-that word is too trite;
emotion-its worn out. The 10 cars
still up in the money go round like
crazy. Even the wags in the Grand-
stand down on the South turn are
tired of singing "Round and around."
Every minute or so the AP's "speed-
'wagons" bunch on the curves and
their recklessness is injected into even
the prim and slightly snobbish Mrs.
Van Vaughters.
The finish and more of the crowd
roars. Then back to Terre Haute,
Galitzin, Pa., or wherever they came
from.
That's Decoration Day in Indian-
apolis.
R.A.G.

Racing Critics
Expect Record
To Fall Today
Wilbur Shaw Favored ToN
Win Annual Memorial'
Day 500-Mile Racet
INDIANAPOLIS, May 29.-(A)-5
Times turned in for the qualifying
rounds in the Memorial Day Speed-t
way classic seem to say that the old
record set by Kelly Petillo, last year
with an average speed of 106.24 miles
an hour, is doomed to be broken. Rex
Mays turned in the top qualifying1
speed of 119.644 miles per hour to}
gain the pole position when the gun1
sounds to start the famous classic.
Other indications which lead sev-4
eral of the race experts to predict
faster times in this year's run are:
that the famed brick speedway has
been rebuilt for safer driving, and+
that the turns have been widened tol
eliminate some of the piling up onj
the curves that has characterized
several of the previous n'eets. Unless
rain or a hard wind makes the track
hazardous, most of the drivers are
confident of making faster runs than
they did last year. Of course, the
gasoline limitation problem must be
considered as a hazard to some of
the cars, but most drivers had no
trouble in staying under this limit in
last year's race. Each driver is to be
allowed 37 and a half gallons of gas
for the 500 mile grind, which meansI
an average fuel consumption of 13.61
miles to a gallon. The fact that Wil-
bur Shaw qualified with a run of
117.053 miles an hour, and averaged
slightly over 15 miles on a gallon,
to carry off honors in today's race.
As previous Memorial Day speedway;
races have shown, anything can hap-
pen in the mad race with death, and
anyone of the 33 starting cars may
come home with the "bacon." Re-
gardless of what may happen, and if
the elements present a favorable day
for the race, critics are confident that
a new record will be established by
the driver who places first in the an-
nual classic.
Major Leagues 1

Varsity Nine Will
Face Ja pa'sBest
Team On Monday
Coach Ray Fishers proteges will
face foreign opposition Monday when
Waseda University, Japan's cham-a
pionship baseball team, invades Ann I
Arbor. In six games with Americand
teams on their present tour the Jap- i
anese nine has won four and lost twof
games, including their 18-16 defeat
yesterday at the hands of ChicagoC
University, whom they will meet againt
today.g
The Wolverines will be seeking re-c
venge for their '29 and '32 defeatst
suffered while the Maize and Bluek
were touring Japan. Waseda boastst
two .400 hitters in Meisho Go, first
baseman, and Saburo Nagata, right
fielder, although to their native fans1
they are only batting ".40 per cent."''
Other players on the team are: Taichit
Satake; shortstop; Kiyoshi Takasu,'
second baseman; Kasutaka Shiraka-
wa, third baseman; Kiyashi Suzuki,
centerfield; Tashiatsu Tsuruzki, left
field and Capt. Kenichi Oshita,1
pitcher. Professor Chimaki Kageyama
is the team's adviser and Tadachi.
Hoshme, student manager.
Waseda annexed the baseball title.
cf Japan last fall by winning nine of
eleven title games in the Big Six col-,~,
legiate teams, Japan's "big league."
Upsets Scored
In High School
Tennis Match1
Conclusion of the first day's play in
the State High School tennis tourna-
ment saw four favorites including one
defending champion eliminated from
play in the singles division.
SCharles Epperson, Jackson, fell to
Howard Blankertz, Monroe, in the
second round of the class A tourna-
ment yesterday, in a mild upset.
Blankertz advanced to the semi-final
round where he faces Art Kirchen,
Lansing Eastern, this morning. Also
in this round are Albert Kempter,
Grand Rapids Central, who faces the
favored Morris Drilling of Ottawa
Hills.!
Two upsets were provided in the
class C race by Frank Gregorich of
St. Benedicts, Highland Park. Grego-
rich downed Kit Hamlin, Detroit
University School ace, and Frank
Staudecher, East Tawas, the defend-
ing champion, in his march to the
final round. He plays Ed Wipman,
I East Grand Rapids for the title to-
day. Singles finalists in class B were
John Vandermaiden, Grand Haven,
and Clement Schulman, South Ha-
ven. T. Ibsen, Allegan, pre-tourney
favorite, was eliminated in the second
round.
East Lansing virtually clinched the
team title in class B when they placed
two doubles teams in the final round.
This assured them of five points,
while no other team in this division
can earn more than four. Lansing
Eastern and Grosse Pointe are tied
for the lead in class A, with two points
apiece, while East Grand Rapids
holds a commanding 4-2 lead over its
nearest rival in Class C, St. Bene-
diets. However, there is a possibility
of the St. Benedict team winning or
tying for the title in the matches to
be played today.
Play in the tournament will be
continued at 10 p.m. today on the
Ferry Field courts, and the matches
will be concluded this afternoon.

'Organize Now For Next Year'
Is I-M Pica To Independents

By ART BALDAUF i
In a plea for further organization
and competition in intramural ath-
etics, Ernest Smith, intramural sports
department assistant, yesterday urged
independents to organize teams now
for competition next year.
"Although the independents on the
campus greatly outnumber the fra-
ternity men," he said, "by far the
greater majority of intramural teams
competing during this last year have
been fraternity organizations." This
has been due largely to the organiza-
tion under which these units function.
D.D.'s Are Outstanding
Only a few independent teams have
lasted more than a year at the most.
The D.D 's have been outstanding in
this matter, having, been organized
for four years. They elect officers
and managers every spring and have
a limited membership which they
keep full by inviting to join them
men whom they feel are able to help
keep up the prestige they already en-
joy. The All-Americans, Chinese Stu-
dents, Fletcher Hall, Forestry Club,
Lawyers Club, and the Physical Ed-
ucation teams have been organized
for two or three years and are the
D.D.'s closest rivals.
"I would like to see more indepen-
dent teams of this sort continue
from year to year as these teams are
doing," said Mr. Smith. "Forty-eight
fraternity teams competed in the
spring program this year as compared
to twenty independent organizations.
With the program that is offered, the

American Lea
New York ...........

Boston .........
Detroit .........
Cleveland ......
Chicago ........
Washington
Philadelphia...
St. Louis.......

.....2
.....2
.....2
. ....
. .'. .-.-
. ,. . . .

gue
W L
27 13
25 16
23 18
21 17
19 18
21 20
12 25
9 30

Pet.
.675
.610
.561
.553
.514
.512
.3241
.2311

Yesterday's Games
Detroit 4, Chicago 3 (10
Only game scheduled.
National League

innings)

Spar tans topped

Michigan State (1) AB
Welch, If.........4
Weimer, 2b ........4
Sebo, c ..........4
Bartling, 3b ......3
Lehnhardt, cf ......4
Randall, ss ........ 4
Kuhne, rf........2
Ziegel, lb ..........4
Walters, p ........3
MacGrain, rf ......1
"Mayes ..........0

R
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

H
0
0
2
1
1
1
0
0a
0
0
0
5
H
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
2
0

.0
0
1
4
2
2
2
1
11
1
0
0
24
3
2
0
2
11
7
0
1
0

A
0
3
0
3
0
4
0
2
0
0
0
12
A
0
2
1
4
0
0
1
0
1

Dutra Wins; Koesis'
299 Tops Amateurs
DETROIT, May 29. - (P) -It was
on to Balustrol and next week's Na-
i tional Open tournament for Olin
Dutra, Los Angeles pro, tonight after
spread-eagling the field to win the
$3,500 True Temper Open golf cham-
pionship today with an amazing 279
total for 72 holes. He clipped nine
strokes from par.
Charles Kocsis, University of Mich-
igan's Western Conference golf cham-
pion, was low amateur with 299.
Two veterans of the golf wars, Mac-
Donald Smith, of Glendale, Calif.,
and Frank Walsh, shared third place
rwith 288's. Each gave par a beating
in the final rounds, Smith with a
69 and a 71, and Walsh with 70 and
71.
The swarthy Californian rushed
down the final stretch with a pair of
69's, each three under par, to finish
five strokes ahead of Harry Cooper,
Chicago, his closest rival. Cooper
shot a 68, second low score of the
tournament, this morning, and a 71
this afternoon.

St. Louis ...
New York ...
Chicago ...
Pittsburgh . .
Boston .....
Cincinnati . .
Philadelphia
Brooklyn.

... . . . . . . .2.
.... ..... .2
. . . . . . . . ..
. . . . . . . . ..
.... . . . . . .
...........1
.I ....
.I ''''

W L Pet.
24 13 .658
25 14 .641
9 18 .514
9 19 .500
9 21 .475
8 21 .462
6 25 .390
5 25 .375
ames
0.
i 1.
h 7.
klyn 2.

III

Yesterday's G
New York 15, Boston
Chicago 8, Cincinnati
St. Louis 9, Pittsburg]
Philadelphia 10, Broo

Totals .......33
Michigan (2) AB
Rudness, cf .......3
Brewer, ss........3
Ferner, 3b........4
Uricek, 2b ........4
Jablonski, c ......4
Lerner, lb ........3
Kremer, if........2
Heyliger, rf......3
Larson, p .........3
Totals .......29
Ran for MacGrain:

-
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

3
E
01
0
01
0
0
1
0
1
1,

JOIN NOW for Next Year
MICHIGA N WOLVERINE
LANE HALL
OUR MEMBERSHIP IS LIMITED.
FEE -$5.00

2 4 27 9 3
in the ninth.

Iii-

Score by innings:
Michigan State ......000 100 000-1
Michigan.........200 000 00x-2!

Allison,
For

Budge Picked
Davis Cup Singles

Strikeouts: by Larson, 11, by Wal- PHILADELPHIA, May 29. - ( P) -
Strkeots:by arsn, 1, y Wl-Wilmer Allison, National champion,
ters, 4. Bases on balls: off Walters, and Donald Budge, redhaired Cali-
2; off Larson, 1. Wild pitches, Larson fornia star, today were named to play
1. Left on bases: for Michigan, 6; singles for the United States in the
for Michigan State, 6. Umpires, North American Zone Davis Cup ten-
Brannick and Snyder. Time of game, nis finals beginning here tomorrow
1:45. against Australia.

Swing It!
Rolling fairways and perfect greens
plus plenty of hazards make a good
game - at prices you can afford.

1

l0c Sundaes'
OF EVERY KIND

i

WEEKDAYS
18 Holes..
After 5 p.m. .

35c
.25c

SUNDAYS
18 Holes 500
After 5 p.m. ......25c

Season Tickets . $10

1111

i

J
1

!III

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