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May 24, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

?AGETWO SHE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNI~AY, MAY 24, 1936

English Department Undertakes
Experiment With High Schools

Honor Guards,
color :Bearers
Named B Gram

tlassified Directory

Preparatory Composition
Course Work Evaluated
By University Men
By WILLIAM SPALLER
A "cooperative experiment" to pro-
mote better correlation in the teach-
ing of English in high school and
college has been undertaken this year
by the English department of the
University.
The work consists in commenting
on and evaluating papers of high
school students representative of the
written work done in the last two
years in the preparatory English
course. The work this year has been
restricted to the teaching of written
composition and was joined in by more
than 60 high schools both within and
without the state.
The program has been under the
direction of the Michigan Commit-
tee on the Articulation of High School
and College English, headed by Pro-
fessors Clarence D. Thorpe, Erich A.
Walter and Earl Leslie Griggs of the
English department. Other members
of the committee include teachers in
Michigan public schools and Profes-
sors Roy W. Cowden, E. S. Everett
and N. E. Nelson, and Dr. Arno L.
Bader, Bert E. Boothe, Dr. J. L. Davis,
Dr. Theodore Hornberger, G. D. Helm,
William P. Knode, A. K. Stevens and
C. F. Wells of the English depart-
ment.
The high schools invited to par-
ticipate in the work include large
schools both in Michigan and out-
side the state who send relatively
large numbers of students to Ann Ar-
bor, and medium-sized or small Mich-
igan schools in sufficient number to
give a cross section of the problem.
More than 600 papers were exam-
ined by members of the committee
last semester and individual com-
mients written to analyze each paper
both in terms of its thought value
and in terms of its mechanical pro-
ficiency. Letters. were also written
Churelies Plan
Relioous Talks
Bly Professors
(Continued from Page1)
preach on the subject "The Religion
of a Liberal" at 10:45 a.m. at the
regular morning service of the First
Presbyterian Church, and at 6 p.m.
the Westminster Guild meeting will
be held on the lawn of the new church
site.
At 8 a.m. Holy Communion will be
celebrated at St. Andrew's Episcopal
Church, and at 11 a.m. the morning
prayer with sermon by the Rev. Hen-
ry Lewis will be held. The student
group will meet 'at 6:30 p.m. at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. T. S. Peirsol
with Prof. Howard McClusky of the
School of Education speaking. Those
who do not know the way to the
Peirsol home will be picked up at
6:30 p.m. at Harris Hall.
At 10:30 a.m., the morning service
of the Trinity Lutheran Church will
be held with the Rev. H. O. Yoder
preaching on the subject "Why Cate-
chize?" The Lutheran Student club
will hold its annual senior banquet
at 6 p.m. May 24 in the Parish Hall
of the Zion Lutheran Church.
A Divine service in German is at
9:30 a.m. at St. Paul's Lutheran, and
at 10:45 a.m. a pre-confirmation ser-
vice will be held. The Student-Wal-
ther League banquet will be held at
7 p.m.
The Rev. Allison Ray Heaps will
talk on "The Unfinished Task" and
Kermit Eby will speak on the subject
"The Meaning of Kagawa," at 10:30
a.m. at the morning service of the
First Congregational Church.

to each school commenting on each
set of papers as a whole and analyz-
ing the types of composition, teaching
aims and methods and standards.
The program has also included a
limited number of visits to the high
schools, which is regarded as a very
important part of the work.
After papers have been criticized
and appraised they are returned to
the high school which compares, an-
alyzes, and discusses the ratings. It
is believed that the consultant's rat-
ings and comments will have greater
significance for the teaching of high
school English through this method.
Various ways of gathering informa-
tion in the cooperative experiment
have been followed by the committee.
They include courses of study, the
description of particular assignments,
and further ideas and opinions re-
garding a variety of problems in the
whole field.
"We feel," it was stated by Mr.
Boothe, "that the University is
unique in a position to advance the
teaching of English in Dichigan by
developing this body of practical in-
formation and making it readily ac-
cessible to the schools."
Several reasons why the work has
been so valuable were outlined by Mr.
Boothe. They are, that it has aired
the whole problem of the teaching of
English composition with the result
that minor changes in certain high
school curricula have already oc-
curred, that it has given the high
schools a better understanding of
university aims, requirements, and
standards, and that it has brought
the high schools and the university
closer together and has promoted a
feeling of common interests and aims.
Many enthusiastic letters of com-
mendation of the experiment have
been received from high school prin-
cipals. Full-hearted cooperation has
been promised mith the hope that
the program will continue.
A pamphlet "Preparation for Col-
lege English" has been issued by the
committtee. The bulletin was pub-
lished for the purpose of presenting
"in as clear and concrete a form as
possible what is expected of an enter-
ing freshman as the University of
Michigan."
EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS

Seniors To Escort Honor
SectionI i Procession At
1936 Commencemnit
(Continued from Pagel1)
uel D. Lipsky, Samuel Stearns, Earl
C. Townsend, Jr., Marvin C. Becker,
Charles P. Hunt, Robert W. Rogers.
School of Education, Honor Guard,
Keith B. Campbell, Kai L. Nielson,
Richard C. Deming, Phillip W. Ed-
monson, Michael S. Savage, Richard
L. Prakken, Harry A.- Brattin, Erwin
C. Moessner.
College of Engineering, Honor
Guard, George Atherton, Robert Au-
burn, Rupert Bell, R. Foster Camp-
bell, Lawrence David, Frank Deni-
son, Nelson R. Droulard, E. Widmer
Neumann, Robert L. Taylor, Francis
Wallace, Robert R. Warner.
College of Architecture, Honor
Guard, Irving Eugene Palmquist,
Clarence Henry Rosa.
School of Medicine, Honor Guard,
Kyril B. Conger, Raymond G. Bunge,
Harold F. Malls, Jack G. Oatman,
Francis F. Rosenbaum, Anthony J. J.
Rourke, James R. Shaw, John B.
Wood.
Law School, Honor Guard, John
Barnard Baker, Frederick Keith
Brown, Joseph J. DeLuccia, David
Dow, William A. Groening, Merwin
K. Grosberg, Cyril F. Hetsko, Joseph
H. Jackier, Robert L. Pierce, Donald
L. Quaife, Willard J. Stone, hector
A. Webster, G. Mennen Williams,
Marion Yoder.-
College of Pharmacy, Honor Guard,
Lawrence G. Mann, John P. Spriggs.
School of Dentistry, Honor Guard:'
James P. Baker, G. F. Clair, L. F.
Klausrmeyer, Verne Dodge, Jr., Rich-
ard Huffman, B. C. Travis.
School of Business Administration:
Honor Guard : William Morgan, Her-
bert Soper.
School of Forestry, Honor Guard:
Horace O. Nixon, Allen Bruce Spike.
School of Music, Honor Guard:
John Mosajgo, Alfred Ewing Reid.
Dr. May will have charge of the
parade on Commencement Day. He
has called a drill meeting for 4 p.m.
Tuesday, May 26, in the gymnasium.
Vice-Ch airman
Of hillel Drive
ToBeHonored

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FOR RENT
FOUR or five room apartment for
summer or school year. 209 N. In-
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SUMMER STUDENTS: Light cool
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NOTICES
SELL YOUR OLD CLOTHES: We'll
buy old and new suits and over-
coats for $3 to $20. Also highest
prices for saxophones and type-
writers. Don't sell before you see
,m. Phone for appointments.
2~-3640. ~ ~ ~ x
DRUNK OR SOBER
WASHINGTON, May 23. - W) - -
A "sousometer" test to provide sci-
entific data on degrees of intoxica-
tion, ranging from "dry and decent"
to "dead drunk," was outlined today.

WARNING: Only a reliable furrier
can clean your furs and fur coat
without harming the skins. 32
years of expert fur service recom-
mends ZWERDLING'S FUR SHOP
for safe fur cleaning and storage.
Phone 8507. 16x
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NOTICE: We clean, upholster, repair
and refinish furniture. Phone 8105.
A. A. Stuhlman. 15x
MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our effi-
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WANTED
TUTORING in math. Call at 405 Ma-
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thirty daily. 515
COUPLE: Experienced cook and por-
ter for fraternity house. First se-
mester. References required. Call
4525. 516
Today at 4:15

Lecture by
REGINALD POLE
"Hamlet-the
Prophecy of
Modern Man"
Introduction by
Prof. Howard M. Jones
Seats -75c

Frances
Maddux

TOMORROW at 8:15! Added MATINEE
TUESDAY at 3:15! ESTELLE WINWOOD
invites you to a gay "PART"Y" with the
musical comedy stars, EDDIE GARR and
FRANCES MADDUX. The "Surprise"
Comedy Hit of the Season!
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Nights: 75c, $1, $1.50; Matinees: 50c, 75c
Phone 6300

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Cash
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6 00-WJR Stevenson Sports.
WWJ K-7 Spy Drama.
WXYZ Jack Benny.
CKLW Bulletins; Melodies.
6:15-WJR Rhythm Review.
CKLW Kay Kyser's Music.
6 :30-WJR Phil Baker: Hal Kemp's
Music.
WWJ Fireside Recital.
WXYZ Bob Ripley: Ozzie Nelson's
Music.
CKLW Griff Williams' Music.
6:45-WWJ Sunset Dreams.
7:00-WJR The World Dances.
WWy Major Bowes' Amateurs.
WXYZ Evening Melodies.
C4 LW Master Musicians.
7 :30-WJR To Be Announced.
WXYZ Twilight Hour.
CKLW Horace Heidt's Music.
8 :00-WJR Sunday Evening Hour.
WWJ Manhattan Merry-Go-Round.
WXYZ Jack Hylton's Revue.
CKLW Pop Concert.
8:30-WXYZ Walter Wincheil.
WWJ Album of Familiar Music,
CKLW Vincent York's Music.
8:45-WXYZ Paul Whiteman's Variations.
CKLW Upton Close.
9 :00-WJR Stephen Foster Program,
WWJ Soloist: Symphony
Orchestra.
CKLW Dance Scene.
9:30--WXYZ Adventures of the Hornet.
CKLW Shep Fields' Music.
9:45-WJR Community Singing.
10:00-WJR Press-Radio: Vincent
Travers' Music.
WWJ Dramatic Half Hour.
WXYZ Lowry Clark's Music.
CKLW Horace Heidt's Music.
10:15-WXYZ Bob Chester's Music.
10:30-WJR Ghost Stories.
WWJ Press-Radio: Dance Music.
WXYZ Anthony Trini's Music.
CKLW First Baptist Church of
Pontiac.
11:00-WJR Music Festival.
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Baker Twins' Music.
CKLW Milton Mann's Music.
11:15-WXYZ Duke Ellington's Music.
11:30--WJR Henry Halstead's Music.
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Carl Ravazza's Music.
CKLW Ted Weems' Music.
12 Midnight - WJR At Close of Day.
WXYZ Bert Stock's Music.
CKLW Clyde Trask's Music.
12:30--CKLW Sophie Tucker's Music.
1:00-CKLW Joe Sander's Music.

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for USED Typwuri/ers.
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314 South State Street
All makes bought, sold, rented,
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SINCE 1908 PHONE 6615

A dinner in honor of the newly-
appointed vice-chairman of the Hillel
Foundation drive, Samuel L. Both-
man, Ann Arbor, will be given to the
committee in charge of the drive at
7 p.m. tonight in the apartment of
Dr. Bernard Heller.
At the dinner, reports will be made
of the status of the campaign by the
two sections of the committee deal-
ing with the contributions of faculty
members and townspeople. The stu-
dent campaign will start tomorrow.
The drive, which ends Wednesday,
May 27, is for $3,000. It is part of a
national campaign for $7,000,000 to
aid German and other European refu-
gees and establish a maximum num-
ber of them on a self-supporting basis
in Palestine.
The rest of the members of the
committee in charge of student con-
tributions and their schools are:
James Eckhouse, '38E, Thomas Fried-
man, '38E, Ardo Friend, '38E and
David Klein, '38E, Jack Weissman,
'36L, Sam Travis, '36L, Aaron Low-
enstein, '37L, Stan Joffe, '37, Dan
Cohen, '38.
Those in charge of co-ed contribu-
tions are: Madalyn Meyers, '38, Char-
lotte Glatt, '38, Betty Jane Meyers,
'38, Marian Sanders, '37, Madalyn
Goldenson, '37, Pauline Cohen, '37,
Martha Wise, '38, Rita Baum, '39 and
Doris Robbins, '38.
THE MOST TALKED
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An amazing story of three
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SAMUEL GOLDWYN
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