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February 18, 1936 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-02-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

House Adopts
Bill To Guard
U.S. Neutrality
Measure Sent To Senate
But No Action Expected
Until Tomorrow
WASHINGTON, Feb. 17. - (A) -
A stop-gap resolution designed to
guard America's neutrality until May
1, 137, was adopted today by the
House and sent to the Senate.
The vote of approval, announced
by Speaker Joseph W. Byrns, was
353 to 27.
The measure already was under
consideration in the Senate, but with
the understanding that no action
would be taken before tomorrow.
The resolution shot through under
suspension of the rules, condemned by
opposition as "gag procedure."
With debate limited to 40 minutes
and all amendments barred, House
members advocating a more drastic
measure had no chance to press a
fight for chan'ges, nor could they
command the votes to shunt the res-
olution aside. A two-thirds vote was
required for adoption.
The measure would extend from
Feb. 29 to May 1, 1937, an expiring
provision in the present neutrality
law for mandatory embargoes on sale
or transportation of arms, munitions
or war implements to any warring
nation.
To the existing act, it would add,
however, a ban on the granting of
loans or credits to belligerents in ex-
cess of those needed for ordinary
peacetime business. And in recogni-
tion of the Monroe Doctrine, it would
make the law inapplicable to any
Latin-American nation at war with a
non-American country.
A brisk battle apparently lay ahead
in the Senate, where a bloc led by
Gerald P. Nye, (Rep., N. D.), chair-
man of the Munitions Committee, was
ready to attempt to make the exten-
sion of the embargoes effective only
for 60 days, so that Congress would
have to work out a more permanent
solution for the neutrality problem
this session.
Earlier, Rep. Pittman, (Dem., Nev.)
chairman of the Foreign Relations
Committee, had brought the abridged
neutrality plan up in the Senate.
When Senator Charles L. McNary, the
Republican leader, protested against
unusual speed, it was agreed not to
take any action until tomorrow.
Josef Israels
To Speak Here
On Italian War
To Illustrate 'Ethiopia's
Death Struggle' With
Movies And Slides
Josef Israels, New York Times cor-
respondent and Pathe News repre-
sentative in Ethiopia, who has re-
cently returned from that country
for a short lecture tour of America,
will speak at 8:15 p.m. Wednesday in
Hill Auditorium under the auspices
of the University Oratorical Associa-
tion.
Mr. Israels has entitled his address
"Ethiopia's Death Struggle," and the
talk will be illustrated by moving
pictures and slides.
Described in the February issue of
Fortune magazine as a "novelist,
press agent for Al Smith and son of
the late Belle Moskowitz (guide and
mentor to Mr. Smith) ", Mr. Israels
left for Ethiopia last spring.

It was his second trip to that coun-
try, Mr. Israels having visited Ethi-
opia in 1929 when he became inti-
mately acquainted with Emperor
Haile Selassie.
Mr. Israels read the Emperor's
speech which was broadcasted in
this country several months ago.
Upon his return to America, Mr.
Israels spoke in New York on the
Ethiopian problem, and his address
received wide - spread attention
throughout the country. He has been
associated closely in his work as a
war correspondent with William
Stonepan, formerly a member of the
Michigan Daily staff, who now repre-
sents the Chicago Daily News.
Mr. Israels is only 26 years old, but!
has already attained a national rep-
utation both as a foreign correspon-
dent and as a feature writer for the
New York Tlimes. Notably sympa-
thetic with the Ethiopian cause, his
address should prove timely and au-
thoritative to patrons of the Ora-
torical Lecture course.
Individual tickets for the lecture,
priced at 35 cents, may be obtained
at Wahr's State street bookstore to-
day, or at the Hill Auditorium box
office tomorrow.
Meyers In St. Louis At
Educationa l Meetigs
Prof. George E. Meyers left Ann
Arbor today to attend a series of ed-
ucational meetings in St. Louis. He
is a trustee and former president of
the National Vocational Guidance

Birthday Honored

Profitable Publicity May Put
Lewis' Novel Into Film Soon

HOLLYWOOD, Feb. 17. - (P) -
Publicity may lift Sinclair Lewis' "It
Can't Happen Here" from the Holly-
wood shelf to which it was relegated
last week and rush it into immediate
production as a movie.
"If all this talk continues," said
Louis B. Mayer, head of Metro-
Goldwyn-Mayer, "perhaps we will
find it profitable to make the picture
at once. '.
He referred to the stir of public
comment that cametwith an assertion
of Sinclair Lewis that his political
novel of an American dictatorship
had been banned from the screen by
Will Hays, "czar" of organized movie
producers.
Mayer, whose studio holds the
script of the novel, insisted Hays had
made no such order. The story is

on the shelf, he admitted, but purely
"for financial reasons."
"It would cost too much to pro-
duce," he explained.
Hays refused to talk about the
Lewis statement.
However, E. J. Mannix, M-G-M
general manager, and the "czar" had
approved the script Friday before he
left here for New York.
Lewis insisted his novel had been
banned from the screen because it
might bring "international compli-
cations," and might "offend Hitler
and Mussolini."
To this statement film magnates
pointed to several poltiical films of
recent years to show that political
implications in a story would not be
sufficient reason to keep it out of
production.

Former Instructor
In Pediatrics Dies
BARRINGTON, R. I., -Dr. Lynne
A. Hoag, 42, former member of the
faculty of the University, and also of
the Cornell Medical School and Van-
derbilt University, died Sunday.
Doctor Hoag served on the faculty
of the medical school here from 1920
to 1922 as instructor in pediatrics and
infectious diseases. He held three
degrees from Michigan, obtaining the
bachelor of science degree in 1913,nthe
master of science degree in 1917, and
an M.D. degree in 1918.
GAS KILLS FOUR
SYCAMORE, Ill., Feb. 17. - (P) -
All four members of Albert Jackson's
family were found dead in their beds
here today -killed by escaping il-
luminating gas, Coroner R. P. Culver
said.

Cancer Exhibit Now'
On Display For Public
An exhibit on cancer is being dis-
played daily from 8 a.m. until 12
noon and from 1 until 5 p.m. through
Saturday of this week in Room 210
of the West Medical Building.
The exhibit will be moved to the
University Hospital next week and
will be shown at the same hours from
Feb. 24 through Feb. 29.

Prof. Charles A. Knudson of the
French department left Ann Arbor
yesterday enroute for Europe, plan-
ning to stop off for two weeks at his
home in Mamaroneck, N.Y.
Professor Knudson will be absent
all semester on sabbatical leave. He
plans to spend most of the time do-
ing research work in Italy and France
and will return here in the fall.

Knudson Is En
On Trip

I)

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PROF. MOSES GOMBERG
Many Friends
Attend Party
For Gomberg
The seventieth birthday of Prof.
Moses Gomberg, who retired Friday
as head of the chemistry depart-
ment, was commemorated on Feb.
8 by 275 of his friends at a dinner in
the Union.
Attending were many former stu-
dents of Professor Gomberg as well as
associates from the University fac-
ulty and prominent alumni from var-
ious sections of the country. In
honoring his character and service
they presented him with a bound vol-
ume of birthday greetings, estab-
lished a scholarship in his name, and
gave the chemistry department a
large portrait of the man who had
taught there for 43 years.
The volume of birthday greetings,
which came from alumni and friends
as spontaneous expressions of good-
will, was officially presented by Lewis
E. Lloyd of Ann Arbor on behalf of
Phi Lambda Epsilon, honorary chem-
ical society. Bound in red morocco,
it carried the name, Moses Gomberg,
and the date on the cover page.
The scholarship fund, likewise un-
solicited, will be used, in accordance
with Professor Gomberg's wish, to as-
sst outstandingundergraduate stu-
dents of chemistry who need financial
help, and will be administered by an
executive board. Announced in a
letter to President Alexander G.
Ruthven, the fund at present
amounts to $5,000. It is expected that
further donations will follow as Pro-
fessor Gomberg's friends learn of the
project.
Report Shows
Sidgit Increase
In Sick Cases
Fifty more patients were sent to
the University Hospital from July to
January, 1935, than for the same pe-
riod in 1934, it was disclosed by the
monthly report of the Health Service
issued yesterday by Dr. Warren E.
Forsythe, director of the Health Serv-
ice.
"The outstanding condition," Dr.
Forsythe said, "was 50 per cent more
acute appendicitis than last year,
fairly well distributed."
The reports for December and Jan-
uary were combined because of the
vacation period. They revealed 21
cases of acute appendicitis for the
two-month period. Seven cases of
pneumonia, seven of contagious dis-
eases, and 1,672 "colds" were treated.
Neither January nor December
were unusual months in the number
or kind of cases treated, Dr. Forsythe
said. Student health was good and
the volume of services were about the
same as for recent years.
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READ THE DAILY'S CLASSIFIED SECTION

I __

Statement of Condition

of the

Ann Arbor Savings
& Commercial Bank

Commencement of Business
February 17, 1936

Member Federal Reserve System

ASSETS

CASH ON HAND AND DUE FROM BANKS ........
U. S. Government Obligations, Direct and Fully Guaranteed
Other Bonds and Securities.........................
Loans and Discounts..............................
M ortgages ......... ......
Stock in Federal Reserve Bank .
Banking House and Fixtures.
Customers Liability Letters of Credit.

.. . . . . . . .

7,989,464.32
1,767,819.01
919,004.49

1,188,830.46
790,704.70
60,900.00
313,334.05
3,307.00
$13,033,364.03

TOTAL ASSETS.

LIABILITIES

Savings Deposits........
Commercial Deposits

$,877,221.92
4,972,835.11
119850,057.03

TOTAL

DEPOSITS

Capital Stock--Preferred
'Capital Stock - Common
Surplus ...
Liability Customers Letters of Credit
TOTAL LIABILITIES.

800,000.00
150,000.00
230,000.00
3,307.00
.$13,033,364.03

The main office of the new bank is located in the former Farmers and Mechanics Bank 4uilding, Main
and Huron Streets. The University branch, offering complete banking service, is located at 707 North
University Avenue, the same location as that of the former Ann Arbor Savings Bank branch. The
former Ann Arbor Savings Bank office, Main and Huron Streets, is being operated as a branch for the
present and safe deposit box service is being maintained at the Farmers and Mechanics State Street
branch. Safe deposit box service of the First National Bank and Trust Company has been transferred
to the main office.

OFFICERS

DIRECTORS

RUDOLPH E. REICHERT
M. C. TAYLOR.
WILLIAM L. WALZ.
FRED T. STOWEI
ROBERT F. GAUSS
ALFRED F. STAEB .
COURTNEY A. MAULBETSC
NORMAN A. OTTMAR.
IRWIN STOLL ...

President
Executive Vice President
.Vice President
Vice President and Cashier
.Vice President
Assistant Cashier
CH .. Assistant Cashier
Assistant Cashier
Assistant Cashier

JOHN AIREY
JUNIUS E. BEAL
FRED E. BENZ
GEORGE J. BURKE
OSCAR A. EBERBACH
JOHN C. FRITZ
DR. A. C. FURSTENBERG
LEWIS M. GRAM
GEORGE J. MOE

R. F. REICHERT
ALEXANDER G. RUTHVEN
ERWIN E. SCHMID
SHIRLEY W. SMITH
FRED W. STOWE
M. C. TAYLOR
GEORGE WAHR
WILLIAM L. WALZ

Ann Arbor Sv & Commercial Bank
Deposits Insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Under the Federal Law.

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