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May 22, 1936 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-05-22

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PAGE SIX

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MAY 22, BIG'

PAGE SIX FRIDAY, MAY 22, 1936

mmm -

SCA Promotes
Social Projects
Durino Summer
College Stuidents Attent;
Religious, Sociologieal

Hindenburg Ends Sero'nd Trip To United States

Schools Schediled
In conjiucion with associated or-
ganizations the SCA will promote a
group of projects this summer
throughout the country of religious
and sociological character to which
attendance will be open to University
students, it was explained yesterday
by Prof. Leroy Waterman of the clas-
sical languages department.
One of the projects will be conduct-
ed at the Presidents School at the
Union Theological Seminary in New
York City in cooperation with Co-
lumbia University and offering college
credit. The purpose of the school, it.
was explained is to equip undergrad-
uate men and women by means of in-
tensive study and discussion for cam-
pus Christian leadership in Christian
association and church groups.
The League for Industrial Democ-
racy Summer School will conduct a
laboratory in labor and social action
also in New York city in which stu-
dents will be assigned to various local
labor .organizations for practical ex-
perience.
Sponsored by the Friends Service
Committee and others, an Emergency
Peace Campaign will be conducted in
which the students will receive two
weeks of training at Grinnell College
and then sent out in groups to do field
work in strategic rural areas.
A college camp on Lake Geneva,
Wis., will be held which will have
as its theme "M,[y Campus and the
Changing World." The leaders of
the conference camp will include

(roup Formiied
'o livestioate
Medical Fields
Development of varied viewpoints
on the utility and application of re-
search in medical and related sci-
entific fields will be the immediate
1011(1101)l of the Zarafonetis Foun-
dation, newly organized group of sen-
i:rs and graduates, it was learned
yesterday.
When, through discussion and the
presentation of opinions by indivi-
duals in active contact with medicine,
the organization has consolidated its
attitudes, it is planned that a positive
course of action will be postulated
I and the members encouraged to pro-
mote this course during their activity
in various scientific lines.
As the first student movement of
this sort on the campus, the Foun-
dation has invited all who have fun-
damental interest in the problems of
modern medicine to assist at these
first meetings.
The organization has been set up
to operate under a board of direc-
tors comprising the charter mem-
bers. Officers chosen at the initial
meeting Tuesday night in the Union,
are Chris Zarafonetis, '36, president
and Robert Lindberg, Grad., secre-
tary-treasurer.

Siudents To Make "Clleg, Iowa, for a three weeks train;
I ; lutt rio. Studt~rZs %ill then seitrve
W tel E etce T ot for 70 days, a;r expenses being lpaid
for the trip.
The University will have the privi- The student committee here to
lege of nominating 12 students to create interest in the movement is
made up of: Don K. Anderson, '36,
A avel in a caravan sponsored by chairman; Garfield Barnett, '39L,
;everal national peace organizations Phyliss Brumm, '37, Mildred Sweet,
which will tour every county seat and Grad., Julian Orr, '37, Rose Perrin,
town in the country this summer lead 37 and Clarence Kresin, '38.
ing discussions on the subject of -
peace, Dr. E. W. Blakenlan, Counselor
in Religiow; Edlucation, announcedl
yesterday.
This caravan, which will be made -,TAT E TREET
Lip of college students from all over E
uhe country, will meet June 15 at A EWEL ER
either Duke University or Grinell WATCH & JEWELRY REPAIRING
E - - - ~ - - - ~ ~- - ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

III,

i . _.. . . .t,_ ___ ... _ _ .. --- - -_____ ,.. _. _._._.. .__ _ _.___ .

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QUICK ACTION
DISPOSAL SALE!
Friday and Saturday

--Associated Press Photo.
Despite a 17-mile wind, a ground crew of 90 bluejackets and 125 civilians encountered little difficulty in
pulling the giant Hindenburg to the ground at Lakehurst, N.J., where the second North Atlantic crossing was
ended. Here is part of the ground crew pulling the tail into position.

University To Conduct Summer
Camp For Speech-Handicaoped

Enrollment To Be Limited
To 28 Boys And 8 Girls;
Scholarships_ Offered

Toyohiko Kagawa, who recently ap- By R. VANDERBILT SPADER, JR.
peared on the campus, Kirby Page, The University student, absorbed
Sec. Henry A. Wallace, Dean Graham in. his studies and social activities,
and others. seldom takes the time to discover
Other projects will be conducted in many of the projects the University
the eastern coal fields of Ohio, among annually sponsors.
the Indians of Oklahoma, in the TVA One of the least known and most
territory, at Buffalo, N.Y., Morgan- modern developments in the field of
town, W. Va. and near Cleveland, O. summer camps is the National Speech
Further details will be furnished to Improvement Camp, "Shady Trails,"
interested students by the SCA. whose staff of 12 includes four mem-
bers of the University faculty and two
i graduates of the University.
Architects W ill Serving as directors of corrective
" speech are Miss Hildred A. Gross and
Discuss Zoning Harold B. Westlake, both graduates
of the University, and Dr. Harlan
Aipio Bloomer, instructor in speech at the
At Union iio a University. As diagnosticians and ad-
visers are Profs. Clarence L. Meader
and John H. Muyskens, and Dr. Hide
Architects from the Detroit chapter Shohara of the speech department.
of the American Institute of Archi- Run as a camp clinic for speech-
tects and from the Michigan Society handicapped boys and girls from ten
of Architects will be addressed by to twenty years, "Shady Trails" is
Walter H. Blucher and Henry L. Rus- under the direction of Prof. John N.
sell at 6:30 p.m. today as part of a Clancy of the University of Notre
joint dinner and meeting at the Dame and operates in close coopera-
Union. tion with the department of speech
The topic is city planning and zon- an ere r tmcntof seech
ing. Mr. Blucher, of Chicago, who is gversity of Michigan.
the executive secretary of the Na- It is located on the Leelanau Pen-
tional Association of City Planning ItinsulaoateNorthport, Mich.eand has a
Officials, will speak on general prob- cnmp at orthpgrty Mch ns a
lems and phases of zoning work, while camp site of eighty acres of wooded
Mr. Russell, secretary of the Detroit land.
City Planning Commission, will speak As a speech clinic, "Shady Trails"
on zoning in Detroit. , iprovides individual help for curable
Zonng is condere f ie cases of stuttering, lisping, nasality,
toning is considered of importance inarticulation, retardation and slov-
today partially as relating to housing enly speech, it was explained. It of-
and other aspects of city planning and fers training to boys and girls who
partially in view of the national gov- are being adjusted to palatal opera-
ernment's public works aid and of tions and to those whose difficulties
recent movements for zoning in cities arise from hearing problems.
like Detroit, it was explained. As a camp, it provides numerous
The two societies who are meeting out-of-class activities for conditioning
usually hold monthly sessions in De- new speech habits in every sort of
troit. For tonight's occasion, however, group environment. Its body build-
they are holding a joint session in ing efforts combine a vigorous out-
Ann Arbor: mainly as a courtesy to door life with expert physical train-
members of the College of Architec- ing under the direction of E. William
ture and the school of landscape de- Bilto of Michigan State Normal Col-

speech classes, the program includes
such activities as swimming, boating,
hikes, picnics, treasure hunts, camp-
fires, stunts; theatricals and games.
The camp faculty always participates
in the activities, which are planned
for the utmost conditioning of speech
principles learned in class.
A distinctive feature of the camp
and an important factor in its speech
improvement work is the fact thatC
every activity, whether it be study
or recreation, is designed and carried

out with the express purpose of cor-
recting and improving the speech of
the individual camper.
With a staff of 12 speech experts,j
"Shady Trails" opens it fifth season
on June 22 and continues until August
29. Enrollment, which at present has
reached 20 for the coming season, is
definitely restricted so that the utmost
benefits of individual understanding
and instruction maybe obtained.
The camp is divided into a boys'
division and a girls' division, each
having a season of ten weeks. Enroll-
ment is limited to 28 boys and eight
girls.
In addition several scholarships are
offered by the camp to cover part of
the expenses.

CHICK! CHICK! CHICK!
EAST LANSING, May 21.- (P) -
The poultry division of Michigan
State College announced the winners
today in the Michigan Baby Chick
Show which ends with an auction
of the chicks tomorrow.
Approximately 5,000 chicks were
shown in the exposition. There were
36 competing hatcheries.

MAIN

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NAVY - GREY - TAN - CHECKS
iZeS 12 to 3 8
Vt lties to $29.75
$10

Man

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The man tailored vogue continues to reign! . . the
single breasted, the link button and the action back.
White promises to lead every color with natural next,
followed by the pastels.
These are being ShOWn in:

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Kaffir Cloth
You'll like these su-
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and light is this girdle... but the effect
on your clothes is truly amazing. Not a
hint of a wrinkle will mar them. Knit
of "Lastex,' boneless, seamless and pre-
shrunk for washing. Even sizes 24 to 30.
iGoodyear's
COLLEGE SHOP
713 North University Avenue
Telephone 4171

8 BETTER SUITS - HALF

PRICE

SPRING COATS 1/2 Price
For TRAVEL.
DRESSES
including
*30 "Daytime"-- "Street" and "Afternoon"
Values to $29.75
$5 95
15 Formals and Dinner Dresses:.. $5.95

8
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Knitted Dresses (2-piece Boucle) $5.95
Wool Costume Suits .......... $5.95

sign. lege.
Although the conference is mainly Besides the usual camp duties and
for the two organizations taking part, --- -- -- --
seniors and graduates in the College .
of Architecture and anyone profes- License Orcinance
cin al'Erirtooct n ho 7n in brh -

$10.95 to $16.95

sionally interested in t e zoning prop-
lem have been invited to attend.
Cosmetic Contest
Winner Announced,
Edward W. Schmidt, '37, of Buf-
falo, N. Y., was announced yesterday
by the Gargoyle as the winner of the
$100 first prize in a national contest
sponsored by a cosmetic company in
the Gargoyle.
The object of the contest it was
explained was to write a verse en-
titled "Fern Not Pansy" about the
product and to illustrate it with a
cartoon.
GLIDER CLUB OFFICERS ELECTED
At a meeting of the Glider Club
held Wednesday night the following
officers were elected: Floyd Sweet,
president; Don Alexander, secretary-
treasurer; Glen Brink, corresponding-
secretary and engineering represen-
tative, Warren Underwood.

May Pass Council
An ordinance requiring the licens-
ing of all mechanical amusement de-
vices of the baffleboard at a rate of
$5 per month for each device was
passed to its third reading by the
city council at its last meeting.
The chief of police would be re-
quired to approve each machine before
a license is granted by the city clerk,
and proper permanent identification
would also be required. Machines pay-
ing in money or slugs would not be
permitted.
Unless accompanied by parents or
guardians, minors would be prohibited
from playing. Individuals or oper-
ators of machines permitting such de-
vices in their places of business con-
trary to the ordinance, would be
subject to $100 fine or 90 days in
jail. In cases of violation, the ma-
chines would be seized and destroyed.
It is expected further action on this
ordinance will be taken by the city
council at its next regular meeting.

Liberty at Maynard

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All First Quality Guaranteed
SPRING SHADES
REGULAR $1.35 2"ars$.9
GLOVES BRACELETS
ALL NEW SPRING SHADES
No. 1 String, Cotton Ribbed. CLIPS - $1.00 Values
In pull-on and button cuff
styles, regular 89c Earrings, 39c
$1.00 Values......
FASHION ANNEX
DRESSES
27 DAYT I MES,
Mostly Light Shades and Prints
15 Two-Piece BOUCLE, Light Shades
10 ORGANDIE PASTEL FORMALS
Val es to $7.95
$369
SUMMER and SPRING

Our Cleaning
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Your furs should be cleaned
at least once a year. It keeps
them fresh and restores lus-
trous fur colorings now par-
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winter grime. Our cleaning
conserves those essential oils.

Need Repairs?
Call in oir Fur Doctors!
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SPECIAL PURCHASE of

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Exaulsite Lingetrie

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