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May 17, 1936 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-05-17

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SUNDAY, MAY 17, 1936

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tartars

And

Hurons

Tie

For

Honors

In State

Track

Disputed Relay
Ruins Wayne's
Title Advantaoe
Allan Tolmich Gets Firsts
In 100 And 220 Dashes
And Both Hurdle Races
By ROY HEATH
Wayne University and Michigan
State Normal College battled to a
tie in the finals of the Michigan
State Intercollegiate Track and Field
meet yesterday afternoon at Ferry
Field as the result of a disputed one-
mile relay. The winners scored 431/3
points each as Michigan State, de-
fending champion, trailed with 35 3
points.
Wayne went into the one-mile relay
with a chance at a clear title by
second place performances, largely
as a result of four first places gar-
nered by Allan Tolmich in the 100
yard dash, 220 yard dash, and both
the hurdle races.
Double Foul Claimed
On the anchor leg of the race Sher-
man Ford of Western State cut
sharply in front of Jim Votta, the
Wayne runner, forcing him to break
his stride and finish third behind
Michigan Normal and Western State.-
The race was protested by Wayne
and a counter protest was lodged by
Michigan Normal on the grounds that
their lead-off runner had been foulesd
by a Wayne man. The decision of
the judges was that the places should
be awarded as the schools finished,
thereby throwing the school into a
tie for the championship.
Al Tolmich, crack Tartar speedster,
turned in the outstanding perform-
ance of the afternoon as he breezed
through to win four events and set
a new meet record of 14.7, 3 tenths
of a second better than the old stand-
ard of 15 flat, set by Bath of Michigan
State in 1932, in the high hurdles.
Tolmich took the lead at the gun in
all four of his events and was never
threatened seriously.
Two-Way Winner
Abe Rosenkrantz was one of the
mainstays of the Michigan Normal
crew as the two-way winner at last
year's Jewish Olympics, held in Pales-
tine, pulled away from the field in
both the mile and the 880 and ran a
leg on the winning Huron one-mile
relay. In the 880 Rosenkrantz staved
off a game second lap threat by Ham-
ilton of Detroit University and gal-
loped home to a new meet record
of 1:54.0 for the distance. The old
record was 1:55.5 established by
Gaines of Western State in 1929.
Constantine Eizak of Wayne also
collected a pair of victories in the
shot put and the discus. Eizak tossed
the platter 135 feet, 7% inches and
the shot 45 feet 1% inches as he took
the events.
The other contesting teams finished
as follows: Western State, 28; Kala-
mazoo 10; Grand Rapids Junior, 5;
University of Detroit, 5; Hope, 2;
Olivet, 1.

ii r___________ ______

- i

The HOT STOVE
- By BILL REED -

,

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T'HIS is the Swan Song of the Hot Stove, its final appearance.
For ten months I have thought periodically of this moment. Then
with the license which the occasion affords, I would be able to give vent
to all the pen-up emotion and sentiment to which I had been moved so
many times during the past year. but which good taste forbade expression.
Now the moment is come - but somehow that effervescent enthusiasm
which I thought would mark this moment is absent. In its place is a growing
nostalgia born of the past four years which have been the happiest of my life.
I think back of the kid who knew no other school than Michigan since
he could speak of college; then of the round little fellow who escaped
his guardians on a pilgrimage to Ann Arbor to sneak into a corner of
Ferry Field to watch Bennie Oosterbaan, his immortal hero of the
moment; then the same kid, older but no less rotund, watching a state
track meet in which Willis Ward was jumping higher than that pudgy
youth believed human legs could send human body.
Those are the most vivid recollections from the background of the boy
who ultimately went to Michigan, where he was to come into close contact
with Bennie Oosterbaan, still no less a hero but now an embryo journalist's
confidant, and with Willis Ward, also still a hero but now another personal
news source.
At Michigan that boy who knew no other school but Michigan and no
other athletes but Michigan's, was to meet the inevitable disillusionment in
finding that the names whom he had worshipped from afar were but fellow-
beings, just as human as he. But disillusionment isn't the word, for it implies
a disappointment in those individuals as he found them at close observa-
tion, and a real disappointment there has never been.
In four years I have gone through many stages here - from the all-
worshipping to the all-deprecating, and around the cycle, but tonight,, as
those four years near their end, I can make my judgments.
Of Michigan I am proud. It's name, its traditions inspire me. For
it is of the truly great.
It is net perfect. It will stoop or step into the shadows. It may be
inconsistent, it can be a hypocrite. But every one of those derelictions
is but caprice - of an institution whose greatness transcends mere
human weaknesses.
I am proud of Michigan, for the respect and attention which it commands.
I have seen the things which create that respect. It is the performance
of men who cannot reserve their better than best. They are the spirit of
Michigan - the men in whom the tradition is so instilled that they cannot
help but do a little more than asked.
It is they, with the pudgy little fellows who live for Michigan far away
from Ann Arbor town, 'that makes this institution. There is something
touching in their faith in Michigan and its future.
They have lived that Michigan will continue to give a little more
when the going gets hard, and they live that Michigan will spare them
tragic disillusionment when it comes their turn to face the actualities
of this institution.I
I have been spared that latter tragic disillusion, and I have seen
men give their all that Michigan may live in its glory, during my four
brief years here. May it be ever so.
A N OPEN MESSAGE of personal feeling.
To George Andros, who succeeds me as conductor of this page: May
your incumbency be as filled with thrills, tears and smiles as has mine.
Good luck!
To all my associates on The Daily sports staff, and particularly George
Andros, Fred Buesser, Fred DeLano, and Ray Goodman:
I have been told by several observers whose opinions I sincerely respect
that our page this year has been the best in history. I deny responsibility
for whatever laurels it may have achieved, it has been the sincere interest,
hard work and intelligence which you have applied which have been re-
sponsible. I am grateful.
To the Michigan track team, and Coach Charlie Hoyt: You are the Mich-
igan I like to think of, I have no fear for you.
To the Michigan athletic administration, coaches and players: We who
know your aims and ideals, will have no trouble with cheap barbs of jealousy
from outside.
To all: THE HOT STOVE IS DEAD, LONG LIVE THE HOT STOVE!
I ________________________________________________________ _________ _________ ______ ______

Detroit Netters I
Defeat Varsity
By 5-3 Score,
Kahn And Rodriguez Take1
Singles Matches Playing
Brilliant Tennis1
DETROIT, May 16. - Despite the
great play of Capt. Howie Kahn and
Johnny Rodriguez who defeatedz
George and Johnny Reindel, Michi-
gan's Varsity net team went down
to another defeat, this time at the
hands of the Detroit Tennis Club,
by a 5-3 score here today.
Captain Kahn rallied after losing
the first set 6-4, and drove out a
4-6, 6-3, 6-4, victory over George
Reindel, who is a former Michigan
player and who holds the Detroit
City title at the present time. Kahn's
greater steadiness was the deciding
factor in the match as he repeated-
ly outlasted Reindel in great rallies.
Justifies Coach's Faith
Johnny Rodriguez, who was moved
up to the number two position to
take the place of the Varsity's two
veterans, Miller Sherwood and Jar-
vis Dean, both of whom are laid up
with sickness and injuries, justified
Coach John Johnstone's faith in him
by trouncing Johnny Reindel, run-
ner-up to George Reindel for the De-
troit City championship, in straight
sets, 6-4, 6-3.
Carl Grawn, Detroit veteran, was
just too good for Jesse Flick in the
number three match and won in a
walk, 6-2, 6-2. Grawn will face
Michigan again tomorrow as a mem-
ber of the Grosse Point tennis club
and despite his advanced years will
give the Varsity netters plenty to
reckon with.
Lewis Is City Champ
Ted Thorward ran up against
Steve Lewis, Ann Arbor city cham-
pion for a great many years and
runner-up to LeRoy Weir for the
same title last year, and found his
strategy in trying to run his oppon-
ent as he went down to defeat in
straight sets, 6-1, 6-4.
SUMMARIES
Singles
Kahn (M) df. G. Reindel (D),
4-6, 6-3, 6-4.
Rodriguez (M) df. J. Reindel (D),
6-4, 6-3.
Grawn (D) df. Flick (M), 6-2, 6-2.
Lewis (D) df. Thorward (M), 6-1,
6-4.
Cauley (D) df. Levenson (M), 6-3,
11-9.
Doubles
G. Reindel and J. Reindel (D) df.
Kahn and Flick (M), 8-6, 6-4.
Mays Qualifies For Pole
Post In 500-Mile Race

Bold Venture Wins
I 46th Preakness
BALTIMORE. May 16. - UP) -Bold
Venture proved today his victory in
the Kentucky Derby was no mistake.
In as dramatic a finish as the turf
has ever seen, the chestnut son of
St. Germans, owned by Morton L.
Schwartz of New York, nosed out Wil-
liam Woodward's Granville and Wal-
ter M. Jefford's Jean Bart in the
46th running of the Preakness before
a crowd of 40.000 at Pimlico.
The margin of victory was so nar-
row, however, that the judges called
for a photograph of the finish before
posting the numbers.

Golf Summaries
DOUBLES
Kokes (70) and Hobart (81). (I)
def. Captain Kocsis (73) and Malloy
(79) (M), 2 to 1.
Saunders (78) and Barclay (76)
(M) def. Zahn (83) and Hill (78)
(I), 3 to 2.

SINGLES
Captain Kocsis (71) (M)
Kokes (73) (I), 212 to .
Hobart (I) (69) def. Malloy
(M), 3 to 0.
Saunders (73) (M) def. Hill
(I), 3 to 0.
Barclay (78) (M) def. Zahn
(I), 22 to %.

def.
(74)
(85)
(83)

Box Score

FIRST GAME

Michigan (2) t
Rudness, cf .......
Brewer, ss ........
Ferner, 3b ........
Uricek, 2b......
Jablonski, c .......
Lerner, lb .......
Kremer, lf .......
Heyliger, rf.......
Larson, p.......
Totals......

AB R
.4 1
.3 0
.3 1
.4 0
.4 0
.4 0
.4 0
.4 0
.4 0

H
3
1
1
1
0
1
1
0
0

O
2
2
1
1
5
10
0
2
1

A
0
1
1a
0
0
0
0
2

E
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0

WHAT A MAN!
Though he never brags about it,
Billy Wells, welterweight, of San
Francisco, went through534 fights
in his career. He was in the ring
from 1910, when he started in Eng-
land, until 1932, when he fought in
Stockton, Calif.

32 2 8 24 4 3

Illinois (3)
Reinhart, If
Doncisok, cf
McDonald, rf
Duffner, lb
Franklin, ss
Weber, 2b
Melino, 3b.
Daukus, c
Swanson. p . .

AB
4
.. 4
.......4
.. 3
.. 3
.. 3
3
2
.. 3

R
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0

H
0
1
1
2
0
0
1
0
0

0
2
2
1
13
1
1
2
5
0

A
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
2
2

E
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0

Genuine
Orientals
Give you mosaic floor cover-
ing. Their charm and dur-
ability are proverbial.
We have choice Sarooks, Ka-
bistans, Kazaks, Royal Bok-
haras, Shiraz, Isbahan, etc.
ALSO FINE
9x12 Sarooks, Keshans
at low prices.
THIRD FLOOR

Totals

...29 3 5 27 7 1

Michigan .............200 000 000-2
Illinois .............100 020 000-3
Three base hits - Don Cisok. Stol-
en bases --Rudness, Don Cisok. Sac-
rifices - Dreffner, Daukus, Brewer.
Base on Balls-off Swanson 1. Struck
out - Larson: 4, Swanson, 5. Umpires
Moore and Mattoon.

SECOND GAME

Michigan (9) ABR
Rudness, cf ........1 1
Brewer, ss ........4 0
Ferner, 3b ........4 0
Uricek, 2b ........4 1
Jablonski, c ........5 2
Lerner, lb ........3 1
Kremer, If......4 2
Heyliger, rf ........4 1
Gee, p ............1 0
Fishman, p........4 1
Totals ........34 9
Illinois (3) AnR
Reinhart. If ......4 0
Doncisok, cf. ....5 1
Franklin, ss ........5 0
Duffner, lb....... 5 1
Melino, 3b ........2 1
Henry, rf ..........4 0
Weber, 2b .........4 0
Daukus, c ........3 0
Berg, p ............2 0
Cherry, p ........0 0
Sainti, p ..........0 0
*Nichelwicz .......1 0

H
0
1
0
2
4
1
3
2
0
1
14
1
1
1
1
2
2
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
2
0
0
2
5
14
3
1
0
0
27
0
0
1
2
12
1
0
1
9
1
0
0
0

-- --- -_________----_____
MAXIMUM (M
BUOILDRSA
S AVI NG(mS A CCO U NT I
The person who has adopted a sound savings policy has the
advantage over the man or woman who has been less thrifty.
A savings account allows you to grasp opportunities that
carry requisites for a financial reserve and it also provides
one with a peace of mind in knowing that emergencies call-
ing for ready cash can be met.
Ann Arbor Savings
Commercial Bank
Main Office: University Office:
Southeast Cor. Main & Huron 707 North University Ave.
Phone 2-2576 Phone 4281

University
TENNIS
Service
EXPERT STRINGING
South University opp. the Den

TYPEWRITING
and
MIMEOGRAPHING
Promptly and neatly done by
experienced operators at mod-
erate rates. Student work a
specialty for twenty-eight years.
0. D. Morrill
314 South State Street

loll

Owens, Ohio State, Sets
Unofficial Century Mark
MADISON, Wis., May 16. - (,) -
Jesse Owens of Ohio State Uni-
versity bettered the world's record in
the 100-yard dash today, running it
in 9.3 seconds in a dual track meet
between Ohio State and Wisconsin,
in which the Badgers surprised the
Buckeyes to win 66 2/3 to 59 1/3.
Owens beat by one-tenth of a sec-
ond the previous record of 9.4 which
he held jointly with George Simpson
of Ohio State. The Buckeye Negro
star gran with a stiff wind at his
back, however, and the new mark
probably will not be officialy recog-
nized.
WINS UNION SWIM
Matthew Sielski, '37E, finished
ahead of the field in this year's Union
Ten-Mile Swim. Following him were
Richard Kurtz, '39E, Robert Ashe, '37,
George Lockwood, '39E, Phil Shorr,
'36D, and Bert Holtby, '39, in the order
named.

Big Ten Standings
W L Pct.
Michigan ..............7 1 .875
Iowa ..................6 1 .857
Minnesota .............6 1 .857
Illinois..............8 2 .800
Indiana ................5 2 .714
Chicago ..............5 3 .625
Wisconsin ............3 4 .428
Purdue ................1 9 .111
Northwestern ..........0 9 .000
Ohio State .............0 9 .000

INDIANAPOLIS, May 16. - (P) -
Rex Mays, heavy footed youngster
from California, again proved his
mastery over the Indianapolis Motor
Speedway today, at least for 25 miles,
by winning the pole position for the
second consecutive time for the 500
mile automobile race to be run May
30.

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Totals........35 3 8 27 15 2
*Hit for Cherry in 9th.

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III

.-
__.____.._____._ T_.__ ._ _.__
.___. __ ___..-------__v.__.____.___ __ ,

-a
WEEKDAYS
18 Holes..........35c
After 5 p.m. ....... 25c

Every Hole
A Thrill!
You can play better golf on
a better. course. Sloping
fairways, beautiful greens,
all that you need to im-
prove your game.
Reasonable Rates
SUNDAYS

1111,I

S18 Holes ..
After 5 p.m.

50c
25c

ElI

Season Tickets . . .. $10

I

1181

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