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May 15, 1936 - Image 23

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-05-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIFTEEN

Religion Plays
Large Part In
Campus World
Ann Arbor Churches Also
Stress Educational And
Social Activities

SCA, Oldest Campus Organization
Also One Of Most Active Groups
The University of Michigan Student , it be in the field of religion or recre-

Christian Association is the oldest
organized student organization on the
campus, having been founded in 1857.
More commonly known anrong stu-
dents as the 'SCA," the organization

ation.
Although apparently designed along
the structure of the YMCA and YWCA
Lane Hall is opened to all creeds and
church affiliations, no lines being
drawn on any of its work, whatso-
ever.

IDEAL OF COLLEGE
"My ideal of a liberal arts college
is one that insists on a complete sym-
metrical knowledge of the funda-
mental laws of nature, a compre-
hensive survey of the best in all lit-
erature, and a general acquaintance
with the great principles that should
regulate all human conduct." Ezra
Brainerd, one time president of Mid-
dlebury College sets forth the school's
guiding principles, unchanged since
1809.

is in all respects similar to a com-
Student activities of a social and bined YMCA and YWCA.
educational, as well.as a religious na- No specific membership is retained
ture. are sponsored by the various and everybody enrolied in the uni-
chu rches in Ann Arbor. versity is included in its membership.
The students themselves initiate Both men and women serve on the
and execute their own ideas in the 1 joint committees and controlling
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saU en wo I, a,┬▒ougnuZI Ue mn t)us
and directors of student activities are
ever willing to advise and assist.
There are over a score of churches
in Ann Arbor, and the importance of
their work is well illustrated in the
statement of President Alexander G.
Ruthven: "In the life of the indi-
vidual today, I see no greater need
than for reverent reflection uponspir-
itual matters, and in the world at
large, none more important than for
spiritual leadership."
In addition to the many ministers,
Dr. Edward W. Blakeman, counsellor
in religious education is ever ready
to offer friendly advice to the troubled.
In the hope that religious issues
will not be neglected, avoided, or de-
ferred, Dr. Blakeman is always anx-
ious to discuss personal problems with
students - problems demanding inti-
mate attention.
Students are invited to drop in
upon him to speak of such ques-
tions as home would help them an-
swer were parents near, to thresh
out any intellectual issues, or to con-
sider church relations.
Likewise, the campus rabbi, campusl
priest, and various campus pastors
will be available for consultation and
advice. A minister of the student's
own denomination will welcome him
as he takes up residence at the
University.
Contact with religious organiza-
tions on the part of the University
is another item for Dr. Blakeman.
Ann Arbor's churches are: St. Tho-
mas, St. Mary's, First Baptist, Second
Baptist, Church of Christ Disciples,
First 'Congregational, St. Andrew's
Episcopal, Bethlehem Evangelical,c
Calvary Evangelical, First Free Meth-r
odist.1
Jewish B'rith Hillel foundation, St.
Paul's Lutheran, Zion Evangelical
Lutheran, Bethel African Methodist1
Episcopal, First Methodist Episcopal,c
West Side Methodist Episcopal, First
Presbyterian, Unitarian, First Church
of Christ (Scientist), and Trinity Lu-1
theran.i

boards that direct the activities of the
association.
Lane Hall, located on the corner of
Washington and State Streets, is the
central building of the organization.
Housed here are nineteen student
offices, an auditorium, reading rooms,
a co-operative cafeteria, and meeting
rooms. The association activities
serve as a training ground for stu-
dent initiative and leadership. At the
present time the program is complete-
ly under the direction of students,
supervised by a faculty Board of
Trustees.
The S.C.A. is one of the most active
organizations on the campus. Some
of the association activities are: The
work of editing, publishing, and dis-
tributing free a 168-page "Hand-
book" to incoming freshmen. It con-
ducts a Freshman Rendezvous Camp
for 150 selected freshmen prior to the
opening of Orientation week. All dur-
ing the school year it provides a series
of lectures and forums in Hill Audi-
torium and other auditoriums around
the campus. During the summer it op-
erates and maintains a Fresh-Air
camp at Patterson Lake to which it
sends underprivileged adolescent boys.
Located In Lane Hall
Every year it stages an "All-Cam-
pus" entertainment to raise funds for
the camp. During the fall S.C.A. or-
ganizes a' special sociological trip to
the city of Chicago. Under the direc-
tion of S.C.A. officers and Dr. Frank
Beck, formerly of Northwestern Uni-
versity, a three-day tour through the
slums of Chicago is conducted.
In addition to its major projects the
association carries on innumerable
other activities, such as publishing
a weekly guild bulletin, conducting re-
ligious surveys, working with foreign
students and other varied activity.
On Patterson Lake, 25 miles from
Ann Arbor, the S.C.A. owns a large
club-house where they hold retreats
as well as social gatherings, such as
week-end skiing and skating parties.
In brief, all of Lane Hall activities
imply "service" to students, whether

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