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May 10, 1936 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-05-10

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THE MICHIGAN iXIL

SUNDAY, MAY 10, 1936

LATE
WIRE
NEWS

Militant, Aggressive Auto Union
PolicyPresaged In Convention

Classiflied Iii reeE ory

Monopolists Are
Assailed By Borah
CLEVELAND, May 9.- () -
Senator Borah (Rep., Ida.) to-
night asserted a segment of the
Republican leadership was fos-
tering a monopolistic system
which brings "a scanty meagre
living for the vast majority and
almost incalcuable wealth for the
few."
Appealing in a radio speech for
the support of the Ohio electorate
in Tuesday's Republican presi-
dential primary,' he said:
"The Republican organization
and the men who are making
every effort to seize control of
the Cleveland convention, the
oil companies, the utility mag-
nates, the DuPonts, the Browns
of Ohio, the Edges of New Jersey,
the Hilles of New York believe in
the (monopolistic) system and are
its defenders.
"'The ox knoweth his owners
and the ass his master's crib!"
Sex-Crazed Prowler
Sought In Killing
CHICAGO, May 9. - WP) - In-
vestigators sought tonight a sex-
crazed prowler as the killer of
Mrs. Lillian Guild, 50-year old
business woman, who was found
battered to death in her room in
the downtown Y.W.C.A. hotel.
Reconstructing the crime from
evidence of the struggle, homicide
squad experts believed the slayer
had snatched his weapon - a six
pound. stone - from. a .nearby
prick pile, had scrambled up a
fire escape just off North Mich-
igan Avenue and swung through
a window to gain entrance to
Mrs. Guild's room.
There after a furious battle and
criminal attack, he left his vic-
tim dead. Her body, only partly
covered by a rose kimono lay on
the floor when a negro maid en-
tred the small bedroom at 10:30
a.m. The room was splattered
with blood. The oblong shaped
weapon lay beside her. Indications
were, police said, that the slayer
had made a quick search through
Mrs. Guild's two suitcases, stowed
under her bed, before fleeing.
Fitzgerald Is
Mentioned For
Vice - President
(Continued from Page 1)
invitation to be keynoter at the Wy-
oming Republican Convention. And
now he has been asked by Henry P.
Fletcher, chairman of the Republi-
can National Committee, to attend
the pre-convention gathering of
G.O.P. big wigs in Cleveland a few
days before the conclave itself.
These facts, say those who believe
most seriously that the Governor's
chances -for being nominated vice-
president are at all strong, prove his
prominence and popularity among the
real bosses of the party -- the men
that will have a large say in dictating
the convention's choice..
Furthermore, Lansing officials be-
lieve, if Senator Vandenberg is not
nominated, he will, nevertheless, have
a good stand-in with the Convention.
He is known to look on Fitzgerald
with favor, and he, himself, stands in
well with all factions. It is believed
here that Senator Borah, if he can-
not get the nomination himself, will
throw his support to Vandenberg.
And also, if the Landon supporters
cannot get in the Kansas governor,
they, too, will back Vandenberg, rath-
er than vote for Borah. Thus, this
argument runs, no matter which way

the Cleveland Convention goes, Gov-
ernor Fitzgerald stands in well.
And finally, the Fitzgerald-for-
Vice-President men hold, because
Michigan is a pivotal, or doubtful
state this year, the Convention will
go out of its way to obtain the State's
19 electoral votes. If Vandenberg is
not nominated, this could be done in
no better way than by putting Fitz-
gerald on the ticket as No. 2 man.

Significance Of Actions Is
Analyzed By Indstral
Research Assistant
(Continued from Page l)
general strike in the automobile in-
dustry next fall if employers failed
to give it recognition were discounted
by Mr. Luchek.
"There is the possibility of strike
action in some plants," he believes,
"but the vast majority of the Union's
rnembers realize the danger of a gen-
EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS

i
1

6:OO-WJR Eddie Cantor;
Louis Gress' music.
WWJ K-7 Spy Drama.
WXYZ Jack Benny.
CKLW Bulletins: Melodies.
6:15-CKLW Kay Kyser's Music.
6:30--WJR Phil Bawer: Ha
Kemp's Music.
WWJ Fireside Recital.
WXYZ Bob Ripley; Ozzie Nelson's
Music.
CKLW Grff Williams' Music
6:45-WWJ Sunset Dreams.
7:O0-WJR Jimmie Stevenson.
WWJ Major Bowes' Amateurs.
84L -RFtaolnRFtaoiRFetaolnlRPGetaini
WXYZ Evening Melodies.
CKLW Master Musicians.
7:15-WJR Rhythm Review.
7:30-WJR South American Orchestra.
WXYZ Orchestra Pit Eachoes.
CKLW Joe Sander's Music.
8 :00-WJR Sunday Evening Hour.
WWJ Manhattan Merry-Go-Round.
WXYZ Jack Hylton's Revue.
CKLW Pop Concert.
8:30-WXYZ Walter Winchell.
WWJ Album of Familiar Music.
CKLW Vincent York's Music.
8:45-WXYZ Paul Whiteman's Variations.
CKLW Upton Close.
9:00-WJR Musical.
WWJ Soloist; Symphony Orchestra.
CKLW Dance Scene.
8:30-WJR John Barclay's Community
Singing.
WXYZ Adventures of the Hornet.
CKLW Shep Fields' Music.
10 :OO-WJR Bulletins: Vincent
Traver's Music.
WWJ Dramatic Half Hour.
WXYZ Lowry Clark's Music.
CKLW Bob Nolan's Music.
10:15--WXYZ Bob Chester's Music.
CKLW Griff Williams' Music.
10 :30-WJR Ghost Stories.
WWJ Press-Radio; Dance
Music.
WXYZ Sid Austin.
CKLW First Baptist Church
of Pontiac.
11:00-WJR Frank Dailey's Music.
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Baker Twins' Music.
CKLW Dick Messner's Music.
11:30-WJR Xavier Cugat's Music.
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Carl Ravazza's Music.
CKLW Ted Weems' Music.
12 Midnight-WJR Max Leib's Music.
WXYZ Bert Stock's Music.
CKLW Clyde Trask's Music.
12:30-WJR At Close of Day.
CKLW Sophie Tucke 's Music.
1:00-CKLW Ted Weems' Music
Eglih Exams
So ToughTey
Made HimFaint
(Continued from Page 1)
year tells whether or not we have
passed and what degree we have ob-
tained; no class work or earlier ex-
ams influence this final result. These
'finals' are given and graded by people
from outside the university - often
by men from Germany, France or
some other country. The exams take
from 36 to 48 hours of continuous 3
hour quizzes. I fainted at the end
of the first 36 hours of my final ex-
amination."
Dr. Whitehall also described the
college life, "The colleges are rather
small. London college, which is slight-
ly larger than the University of
Michigan, is the largest. An interest-
ing feature is the high percentage
of instructors to the students; many
classes have but six students. A big
difference is that contrary to Ameri-
can colleges, most of the intensive
studying is done during the vaca-
tions, which are very plentiful. Dur-
ing the school year, the students take
it easy.
"It is impossible to work one's way
through college in England. Instead
of working, students try for scholar-
ships or awards based on the exhibi-
tion of industry.
"Sports are much different, also.
Participation is considered to be much
better than mere watching; at a re-
cent match to decide the Rugby
Championship of the British Isles,
there were but 75 spectators. Two
half-days a week are turned over to
exercise when all the students and
members of the faculty play games
such as golf, tennis, hockey, rugby
and soccer."
Gala Opening

era] s a-ir aiid do not wi:,h the signed
agreerrieltt! aitl vg iZAd (ufnplaycI'-
employe relaudshIp al eady estab -
lished to be endangered,
A major <<_. ,i1'u f the convention,
according to MVr. Luchek, was the
question of independent unions within
the automobile industi y. In Ihis con-
nection the sentiments of the U.A.-
W.A. appeared to be "extlemely
friendly" toward these independent
organizations. (Thie nast importantl
of these are the Associated Automo-
bile Workels of America, the Auto-
mobile Indostrial WoR kers Association
and the Mechanics Education Society
of America).
Representatives of these organiza-1
tions were pr( :ent, itddedsed the con-
vention and wei eheartily welcomed,
Mr. Luchek stated. The executive
council of the U.A.W.A. was enlarged
by one member to permit representa-
tion of these unions should they join,
and in general the desire for a "united
front" was evident.
The convention went on record as
endorsing the Farmer-Laborite party
and Roosevelt for President.
The central question raised by the
convention is whether the aggressive
and militant sentiment manifested
will be more or less effective as com-
pared with the policy of moderation
and conciliation that has character-
ized the Union up until now, Mr. Lu-
chek concluded.
ENGERT PROMOTED
WASHINGTON, May 9. -- (/P) --
President Roosevelt today cited Cor-
nelius Van H. Engert, American min-
ister-resident to Ethiopia, and his
staff for "courage and devotion to
duty" for their defense of the Ameri-
can legation against maurauding
tribesmen. In recognition, the ex-
ecutive advanced them on rank in
the foreign service.
TENNIS RACKETS
Now at

CLASSIIID I
ADvERIiS1NG;
plae t cladvertinenls wit) Cia ified
Advertliuing Uellal'tii;,eit.. I;C)]n 2-ll21+,
Thv classified (olumns close at fiIV
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Box nuimbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance 11e per reading line
(on basis of live average words to line)
for one or two insertions. 10' per read-
ing line for three or mnore insertions.
Minimum three lines per insertion
Telephone rate - 15e pcer readiig line
for two or noie insertions. Miinniu
three lines per insertion.
101,1 discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
By Contract, per line-2 lines daily,
one month. ...... .............8c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months ............8c
2 lines daily, college year...........7c
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100 lines used asdesired.......:: ..c
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The above rates are per reading line
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letters. Ad d cepCerline to above fr
bold face, upper and lower case. Add
10c per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 71,1 point type.

RE1TJ YOUR Of,D CLOTHES: W'e'l
hl",y o ai d new suits"n ad over-
' fr; $20.Also h t
pines 101 5axophoiies and I ype-
Wit-e'rS nlon't sell before you se
Sain. Pione for appoit.ments.
2_3640. lox
l'yYE, examiled, best lasses inade at
lowst Prices. Oculist, U. of M.
graduate, 44 years practice. 549
Packard. Phone 2-1866. 13x
WARN IN : ()nly a rIliable furrier
call (-lea! your furs and fur c-oat
withol harming the skins. 32
yual's (if expert fur service recom-
mnemcl ZWil-D)LTNG'8 FUR SHIOP
for sa ' fur cleaning and storage.
Phone 8507. 16x

HELP WANTED
WOULD like a three-piece band. Port- LAUND
age Lake. Call Mrs. James. 11513. Care
473 -
--- - ---- -- --- --- -- -- -- --- -- -- -
WANTID
Pu RNIj:EI) house witlh two bed -
r'oo..;by [scully menber from Junc
15 to August 21. Reply, Box 124I.
care Daily.
WANTE): Double garage with dcc
lric light on a quiet street in or i'ai
Anl Arbor. Call 4121 Extension 361
or wiite Daily Box 125. 478
LOST AND FOUND
BtSINESS half of green Parker va-
cuimatic pen. Rewarld. John Fla-
herty, 5572. 477

RY
1f11 w

NOTICE!
Granada
Cafe
3173 S. State
will open
Tuesday
May 12, 1936

LAUNDRY
2-1044. Sox darned

ork at low pr'ice.

A

FO
FOR RENT: 4
3l:d'rtments.
N. z.-t7l St

OR RENT

.

andti 5-iOOmf1 furnished
Sumnier 'or year. 209
Phone 3403. 474

NOTICES

, ''
u.

tacd C OWNS
Place Your Order Without De-
lay. No Deposit Is Required
When the Order Is Given.
We furnish all new outlits of
the better qlality and made ac-
c'ordinlg to tilt' ntercollegiajter
St andards.
Phone Orders - 6915 - 7296
GEO. J. MOE
Star nis Shops__

11

lx

School of Social
Dancing
Taught daily, 10 to 10.
Terrace Garden Studio
Wuerth Theater Bldg.
Phone 9695

I

IMAJ EST IC
NOW -- 25c till 2 p.m.
ONLY THREE MORE DAYS
IT WILL STAND;
AS ONE OF THE

4
4

MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
NOTICE: We clean, upholster, repair
and refinish furniture. Phone 8105.
A. A. Stuhlman. 15x
ANNOUNCES PLEDGING
Phi Gamma Alpha fraternity an-
nounces the pledging of Forest Jor'
dan, '39, of Clare and John Brennan,
'39, of Racine, Wis.

=e

Q.

I

i '

1Fl

IF - ,d

11

n ),Am

*You'll be thrilled over

712 E. Washington

Ph. 9793

N
L

Newly Arrived
S cutler Size
I(AZARS ---- KABISTANS
Also lx 12 Keshiai, Sar'ook,
Their ancient desi gins are
full of su t.stions; their
c(heorru lness i'-' no equal,
and tLuy ar It Soly in
[lie long run.1
TiIICRT) FLO0R

iii

SEE
BOB GACI
at the Camera Shop
in the Arcade for
Commercial Photography
DEVELOPING
PRINTING
ENLARGING
Cameras and Supplies
Miniature Specialties
Fine Grain Developing
35 mm. Film of all types,
All sizes of roll film in stock

Ihis new ring that every-
one is talking about. Any
size photograph in ring.

I

11

I

Complete
ONLY.

$

.00

'ir- '

ISCO& BOYCE
723 North University

SUDDENI
SERVICE

BARTHOLOMEW
DOLORES COSTELLO
B A R R Y M 0 R E
Added - Short Subjects
CobinHog Nex Week -
"Robin Hood of El Dorado"

ON THE

CAMPUS

SINCE

1905

t; _

__________ - - A

A15111

III

a

I

:1

li:

RE

EMIN DE R. . 0 *
When vacation arrives and school is
over for a while, will you be prepared?
We handle a complete line of luggage
for summer travel. The trunk illus-
trated is a HARI'MANN. Due to its
ingenious principle of construction,
not a single inch is wasted. There will
be no wrinkles in your clothes. Drop
in now and look over our stock.
F. W. Wilkinson & Son
325 South Main
"Always buy leather goods
at a leather goods store"

U

Ar

CONTINUOUS 1:30-11 P.M.
W H ITNEY
15c to 6 - 25c After 6
- NOW
FIRST SHOWING
FRANK McHUGH
PATRICIA ELLIS
"F RESH MAN
U msI-E I

Monday,
May 18
"LI BEL"

1'Ay
For clothes. Tires and auto repairs. New things for the home.
So many things, in fact, you almost hate to have Spring roll
around. But don't worry-there's a way out. We'll lend you
the cash it takes and arrange the payments to suit you.
Hundreds of single and married people are getting cash this
w -- ri m .. f-h i ' Wl a rn t .wao _c - - - -.1-. ., .._ ._ -- -.-._.

1-~ I 1-
"c
in Ben Ames
Exciting R
K
ER F

" L

d?22d ?e " .. sear
disi< fp

Williams'
omance!

Kenneth.
MacKenna

With KENNETH MacKENNA, Er-
nest LAWFORD, Doris DALTON
and George SOMNES.

if

Also Popeye
Cartoon
TOMPKINS

I

I

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