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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 09, 1936 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-05-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PA

StudentsMake
Reports Of Bad
Working Place
Workers In dating l~aes~
Issue. Most (2om plaini
Against Un Just. Wages-
(Continued from Pave I)
termed the "phenomenal success o]
the union," and pointed out that
many organizations on the campus
had been many weeks, even months,
in getting organized and obtaining
support, while the Student Federa-
tion, only two weeks old, was thor-
oughly organized and ready for activ-
ity, with members approaching the
250 mark.
"The almost instant success of the
union is a telling indication that
unjust labor conditions do exist, and
that the student body is for amelior-
ation of the situation," he declared.
Asked what methods he thought
the union would use in its drive for
better 'working conditions, Kuhne
said: "I believe, personally, that mere
publicizing the names of the restau-
rants and other places, paying sweat-l
shop wages, will be forceful enough
for our purpose. It will be, if the
entire student body will cooperate
with us in condemning such practices.
We believe, however, that in most
eases proprietors will bring their rates
to a reasonable standard."
Questioned on the subject of
stronger measures, he said that strilfc
and boycott, often necessary procec-
dures in such cases, would probably
not be used, except perhaps as a very
last resort. He stressed the fact that
publication of names of business
places not "playing fair" would be
sufficient.
"Whatever action we intend taking
must,come within the next few weeks,
as the :semester is nearing its closc,
The union will continue during the
summer months, and next year we
should have an instrumcnt that will
insure fair working conditions and a
standard wage to all student work-
ers," Kuhne said, adding that after
the meetingin the Unitarian Church
Tuesday night, some definite program
of action will be undertaken.
New Careers
Awalit Women,

I?(" mait I c ("clebraues Ethiopian Victory

-Associated Press Photo.
hecre is a, tion f the crowd that rnadly .cheered King Victor
Emma.nuel (i~a Licdit'eary ; row) as lie stood on the balcony of Quirinal
Palace in Rome in clebatOn f the hlackshirts' victory in Ethiopia.
1'1n mperol ," i heyca;,d Vtiedoiio longer "King." This picture was tele-
phon df ii J omc ItoLende ai d Oradioed to New York,
Childhood Ihumb its Case Faicial

Defimitiliesl,

Sandwich Men
Descrlibe Rise
Of HotRivalry
(Continued rrom ragc 1)
Moreover, Riksen said, Frederick
Ludwig, '35M, who until his gradua-
tion had Stanley's route, had promised
him, Riksen, his route on the con-
dition that he would not compete.
Ludwig, Riksen said, had violated
the agreement when upon his grad-
uation he had given Stanley his bus-
iness, which had justified Riksen in
competing with Stanley, a policy of
which he informed the latter at the
beginning of this year. At this time,
Riksen said, he had offered Stanley a
job which was refused. Riksen now
has four employes.
A half year of cut-throat competi-
tion followed; and then Sam Spin-
eluli';s alleged "under-the-table" trick
is pulled out of the bag.
When Police Chief Lewis W. Foey
was accompanying "Shorty" Hayden,
alleged killed of Patrolman Ciffoid
Stang last year, back to Ann Arbor,
Spinelli was arrested and ordered to
buy a $150 peddler's license if he
wished to continue business, an order
which hie duly satisfied.
Arrested Two Weeks Ago
Then two weeks ago last Monday
iRiksen was arrested for not possessing
a license. Riksen was willing to buy
one license, but insisted he could not
possibly buy one for each of his fou'
emplo yes.
Spinelli, Riksen charges, induced
the police to arrest him through
"spite." Although both Stanley and
Spinelli denied this last night. Rik-
sen maintains that both had affirmed
his belief in statements previously
made.
"It was just Sam's way of getting
even," Stanley said, according to Rik-
sen.
Pending his trial, now set for next
Wednesday, Riksen with the assist-
ance of his attorney devised a method.
of continuing his business ---- an il-
legal method, according to Stanley
and Spinelli.
Has Fraternity Contracts
He has contracted with fraternities
and sororities for the sale of a certain
amount of his products each night.
If the contracted amount is not pur-
chased, Riksen goes on the assump-
tion that his customers have bought
the products but returned them for
credit good for the following nights
- a customary procedure in all de-
livery business, Riksen maintains.
Riksen justifies his efforts toward
expansion in his employment of stu-
dents and because he believes with a
larger business he can offer better
products.
Originally he started in the business
because students who patronized his
barber shop on South State street
had told him there was a dearth of
sandwich men. It was conducted by
a "down-and-out" friend of his until
the latter got another ,job. Then Rik-
sen took it over and enlarged it.
Hc personally likes Stanley, he
said.
In the meantime, Spinelli wants his
position known to students, Stanley
wants his absence justified to his reg-
ular customers, and Riksen wants his
actions cleared of all suspicion.
WATCH FOR
Jacobson's
Announcement on
Sunday's Society Page

MAY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, at 8:30 P.M.
ia brilliant program of
WAGN ER- BACH

LEOPOLD
STOKOWSI;
and the
PhilIadelphia Orchestra
will open the 43rd Annual

Says

Dr. Moore

FESTIVAL

5
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t
f
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Speakers

Say

Radio, Advertising 1ffer
Unique Opportunities;
Vocational Talks Ind
(Continued from Page 1)
speaker of the evening, while admit-
ting that "advertising takes every-
thing you have to offer and demands
a great deal more," thought that the
retail field especially is a good one for
women because they know how to ap-
peal to other women. Journalism,
history, English literature, and lan- C
guages, as well as practical adver-
tising work are thought necessary
preparation for this field by Miss
Morgan.
Beginners in advertising were ad -
vised to learn the job just ahe'ad of
them and to make themselves in-
dispensable in their work by Mrs.'
Stauch, who outlined the subject of
selling space and ideas. Mrs. Stauch
brought out the point that the best
way to learn salesmanship is by door-
to-door selling.
Radio work, especially the com-
mercial side, also offers a great op-
portunity to the woman college grad-
uate, according to three members of
the staff of station WWJ. Sally
Woodward, Hersehell Hart, and Bar-
bara Brooks told this to a group ye -
terday in the Alumnae Room of the
League.
The many angles to radio were out-
lined by Miss Woodward. The
theatre, singers, engineers, writers,
and home economics experts all have
a chance on the air, she said.
Ability, capacity for hard work,
willingness to start at the bottom, and
ingenuity of ideas are the four pre-
requisites for all those wishing a radio
career, Mr. Hart pointed out. After#
relating the methods by which several
of the more prominent women in
radio have reached their high posi-
tions, Mr. Hart showed that the four
entries into the field of broadcastig
are: the advertising agency, the
newspaper, script writing, and acting.
New ideas and the ability and per-
ser verence in putting them =across are
factors in which the radio industry is
prim arily interested.

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urges 1114l.+v4 i(H I miilf third molars and X-rays of ten-year-
q 4.1oldchlildrIen will show the third mo-
Ser"1Vwe As /", X11°t Jars, if they are going to form. There-
iICH('I ry 4 Iit~i ui oic, it is essential to obtai1 com-
plete radiographic surveys of all chil-
"An otice lp(VuJcl~WII dren's jaws at an early age in order
a toll of cHUilc i;: c s (f, facia" l de to d('tcl the presence of, extra teeth,
forinlitic5 LC L1h h~ mailformed teeth 01' the absence of
ties of theteii rhldwstetth
theme of 'addeidDI ~)~ N gleet4, Condemned As Wasteful
JR. Moore, l reS rI f orthodIont ics ''from the purely practical view-
in t he derft ":!sci tol, l)!-csentedlaist point,," said Dr. Moore, "the cost of
wcek befi~oeth autrllse ;St ate bundlin~g advanced cases of dental ir'-
Dci alScit iiBson gi!laity is prohibitive enough t;o
Formos. an_1r.te ci e of f iube parents to place their chil-
clal deforwities('(Itlolzttie y (e under observation for purposes
dcutist is tooth +(leu, . sMoo(; re old f pieventing these malformations.
the assembly of(flr al fit oniers' ,I) tis way the cost of caring for den-
(~orr et '' vitalli needs will, in the long run, be
Y@ 1o only a. small fraction of, what it would
J:FZI t, ha tv' th1( causew it, is of; be if this procedure is neglected-not
the utmost i ii ".e, 1)ir. MooreI to mention the incurable nature of
said, thlat the iet u Pactitioner advanced deformities.''
should ('0i1Ct'tly Iigjeand treatj..- ___
the case b 1( efoeit is allowed lto afttan uwiiF e c Fir
Luc p,1po Lon thalt ani,,c (nsive, I 'i ~iLFrCen~ch Fl iers
j rolongetre 'a ',tentis ne['ssary. n!e:ct1a, ~i c '1:(" 1 12,c
Pram, Dr. Mor pin ((1ot tatI_______
"the pro blemof e 'him veybd MAR SETLLE, May 8. - (/') -- The
with 01'ol~t('' I''11il 3ii: if h o irti steameri'Elbhiar tonight res-
be more or less d iftl i coui it i i hal 'th {"'1 eisht. persons from a French
service ani (rl d (n ti)iaresealae forced down on the Medi-
mnade an idsesal atof eld c tenjannsouth of the Balearic
mentary (ction ." nd at Pre'S- Islan1ds.
ent. it has bee n et~l d at let None was injured.
half of thl'i>>),ptaI!. iitiT(Oilt' ''heseaplane sent a call for as-
is alf cd(tdb _ 'dZ l i C i h i une late today. She carried four
teeth an nfi (,,w Qi 11~l(~ Ipsegr and a crew of four.
cent ofboer.
vent ableFRESHMAN PROJECT TRYOUTS
Dr. Mooe drusc Ilieimor u('eTryouts for speaking parts in the
of the x-r - !. :lo c f:)d i o, l~ee [resr lnan Pageant will be held from
)5 per cep1int f i e ( 'r ld cildiren 1 p.m. to 5 p.mn., Monday, May 11, in
will show !;h bdso(' alth teeth. the undergraduate office of the
which a) cgoi fo ormi, eetthe lII leage.

Prelude to "The Mastersingers"
Prelude to "Lohengrin"
"Tristan und lsolda"Love Music
by Wagner
LOPOLD STOKOWSKI,
EARL V4

s

Toccata and Fugue in D Minror
Aria
Fugue inG minor
Come, Sweet Death
PassacagIis
by Bach

vill lead thc Philadelphia Orchestra.
WilCodctte MhlaephaRcEsa

Religous Activities
FIRSTMETHDISTFIRST PRESBYTERIAN
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Mlate and 101i.f n'Lrcblet, HUC
11I!P'' ;,l .?i, Masonic Temple, 327 South Fourth
C1I1A!tI ; LW, I !;':11APLESMinisteis: William P. Lemon
anL. 7__ L iLINE IFINCH and Noirman W. Kunkel.
tt i ~ic c't Jh JL. i Ii c
9:45 a i-- Westininster Student
101 A 1 Mi mni WuI iliji I For ur.'The discussion on "How
to Make the Bible Real" will be
W O Ar-IS hEKY led by Dr. Lemon.
a f ' i ,s, a'd10:45 a i.n-- Mothers' Day Service.
Dr. Lemon preaches:
by ,)n.CW 3.1an,. "'BLESSED OF ALL
1I-'n:! i 5014a ('i.L -i i 5t' loI~U
LI IV )I1' ~ II.LI- LILLI 1~I(GENERATIONS'
DOti't NOI(T E'.Y1~P 6:00 p.mn. Westminster Guild pica-
, Il ILn\iic sI III iiiul:Spper on the lawn at 14.32
Iliit ~lt \ lit tLL'1't'~livC~lLIWashtenaw avenue, site of the
'i~I ~ttil' ~t lv 'iIIIIlLIdInew church. Members of The
r1 'LWilitLLWA(ILLWesicyan Guild arc guests. Dis-
cte 1a~lLIibS ii ltt ussion on the subject, ''The
~ 'illt ~ )Nd~811I,.-NEGLEVCT Christian Choice of a Life Work''
'lii) 1Jl11anidiSLj)1)'Iwill be led by Emily Morgan.
YOURRELIIOUS FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Roger Williams Guild
HILLL ON"AIORT. EDWARD SAYLES and
I s HOWARhD R. CHAPMAN, Ministers
Coini L~t.UnumivandOaliau .ACT1'IiIE-14:45 a~w- -Worsip and 'special
Di. t ii ii 1lclerDiretor ermhomby Mr.bayics on
'HONOR THY FATHER
2 IL Itl l'~11. iAN".D THY MOTHER''
-12:00 Noon - The student class
" CiM7PADmeets at Guild House. Mr. Chap-

and the Choral Union
THUR., MAY 114,. 8:30

wuith distinguished soloists:

v

JEANETTE VREELAND JULIUS HUEH.N
PAUL ALTHOUSE KEITH FAL KNER
PALMER CHRISTIAN
Program: CARACTACUS -Edgar
A Limited Number of Tickets for Single Concerts Still Available.

FRIDAY, AFTERNOON, 2:30
YOUNG PEOPLE'S FESTIVAL CHORUS
ORCHESTRAL ACCOMPANIMENT
HAROLD BAUER, Pianist
SAUL CASTON and EARL V. MOORE, Conductor;
Overture to "Russlan and Ludilla,....,. Glinka
The Children at Bethlehem. .......... . Pierine
A Mystery in Two Parts for Soli, Chorus of
Children and Or'chestra
Concerto No. 5 in E flat for' Piano and
Orchestra ...... .......Beethoven
HAROLD BAUER
Mr. Bauer uses the Baldwin Piano
FRIDAY EVENING, 8:30
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
LILY' PONS, Soprano
CHARLES O'CONNELL. and SAUL CAS'ION,
Conductors
Overture to "Marriage of 1igaro"......... Mozart
Arias, from "Magic Flute".... .......... Mozart
Pamnina's Air
Queen of the Night
LILY PONS

SATURDAY AFTERNOON, 2:30
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
E;FREM ZIMBALIST, Violinist
LEOPOLD STOK{OWSKI, Conductor
Symphony No. 1 in C minor ............ Brahms
Un poco siostenuto --- Allegr'o
Andante sostenuto
Un poco allegretto e grazioso
Adagio. piu anidante --- Allegro non troppo, ma
con brie
Concerto in D minor for' Violin and
Orchestra......................... Sibelius
Allegiro moder'ato
Adagio di molto
Allegro ma non tanto
EFREM ZIMBALIST
The Bird of Fire................... Stravinsky
Introduction
The Fire Bird find Hecr Dance
Dance of the Prinscessesc.
Kastchei's Infernal Dance
Berceuse
Fi'nale
SATURDAY EVENING, 8:30
7(OLOISTIS
JEA N NE; tTL VREELAND, Soprano
ROSE B3AMPTON, Contralto
GIOVANNI MARTINELLI, Tenor
KEITH FALKNER, Bass
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA

ATTENTION!
Wild &Co.
RLOPLN ING
TfoBAY

Symphony No. 1 in C major op. 21. . ..Beethoven
Adagio molto -- Allegro con brio
Andante cantabale con mnoto

Ii

'1 AI

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