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May 08, 1936 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-05-08

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PAGE SEA

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FIOt1A [IT,11 8 1936

PAGE SIX FRIDAY, MAY 8, 193G

Russel Lecture
Will Be Given
By Profd.Winter
Winner Of Annual Award
To Be Announced May
14 Instead Of May 7
The date for the annual Henry Rus-
sel lecture for 1935-36 to be given by
Prof. John G. Winter, chairman of
the Latin department, has been
changed from May 7 to May 14, ac-
cording to Frank E. Robbins, as-
sistant to the president.
Also on May 14 the winner of the
Henry Russel award will be an-
nounced. Every year $250 is given
from the Henry Russel endowment
to an assistant professor or instructor
whose scholastic activities were dis-
tinctly meritorious or whose promise
seems to merit the appointment.
The award is conferred by the Re-
search Club of the University, of
which Dr. Heber D. Curtis is ,presi-
dent. The appointment of Professor
Winter to the lectureship this year
was also made by the Research club.
Professor Winter is the director of
the division of fine arts in the literary
college and of the Museum of Classical
Archaeology, and he is the eleventh
faculty man to receive the honor of
delivering the lectureship.
Since 1919 Professor Winter has
held a professorship at the University
and has been chairman of the Latin
department for several years. He was
a lecturer on the Thomas Spencer
Jerome Foundation of the American
Academy in Rome in 1929, and his in-
tellectual activities have brought him
international recognition as a scholar.
He is also a member of the Amer-
ican Philosophical Association, the
Archaeological Institute of America,
the American Association for the Ad-
vancement of Science, and the Mich-
igan Academy of Science, arts, and
Letters.
Previous winners'of the Henry Rus-
sel lectureship are: Prof. Moses Gom-
berg, 1925-26; Dean F. G. Nvy, 1926-
27; Prof. Henry A. Sanders, 1927-28;
Prof. Alfred S. Warthin, 1928-29;
Prof. Claude H. Van Tyne, 1929-30;
Prof. William H. Hobbs, 1930-31; Prof.
William H. Hobbs, 1930-31; Prof.
Jesse S. Reeves, 1931-32; Prof. W. D.
Pillsbury, 1932-33; Prof. Ermine D.
Case, 1933-34; and Dean G. Carl
Huber, 1934-35.
School Board
Awards Grant
For Research
Carrothers Heads Group
Which Will Investigate
Secondary Schools
WASHINGTON, May 7. - A grant
of $116,000 made by the General Ed-
ucation Board for the completion of
the current study of secondary school
standards and accrediting proced-
ures, was announced yesterday by
Prof. George E. Carrothers of the
School of Education.
This study is being carried on by
the Committee for the Cooperative
Study of Secondary School Stand-
ards, which is at present convening
in Washington. It is composed of 21
members and represents the six re-
gional associations of college and sec-
ondary schools - the New England
association, the Middle States associ-
ation, the North Central association,
the Southern association, the North-
west association and the Western as-
sociation.

Professor Carrothers is chairman
of the general committee, and Prof.
E. D. Grizzell of the University of
Pennsylvania is chairman of the ex-
ecutive committee. These two men.
collaborating with Prof. Joseph
Roemer of Peabody College for Teach-
ers, constitute the administrative
committee having direct responsi-
bility for the study. Carl A. Jessen,
Specialist in Secondary Education of
the United States Bureau of Educa-
tion, is secretary of the committees.
A grant of $25,000 a year ago by
the same foundation, supplemented
by contributions in excess of $12,500
from the cooperating regional as-
sociations, has financed the earlier
phases of the study. These have been
Aconcerned with the formulation and
development of sets of guiding prin-
ciples and tentative criteria for judg-
ing secondary schools which are in-
tended to be more valid and flexible
than any that have been in existence
in the past.
The new grant of funds will permit
carrying out the desired experimental
program in some 200 representative
secondary schools throughout the
country.

Ethiopia Extends New 'URoinan' Empire
rr
/
,_1c Set- 5
_7~RN _RA1e .
ALGERIA RC
KEYI
(F R.) r--
EGYPT'
/WEST AFRICA f S
KEY ANGLO

Students Learn
Many Functions
Of Alumni Clubs
Fratcruities Are Contacted
To Aid In Making Known
Services Of Association
Spesking to the alumni of their
responsibility to their alma mater,
.James Burrill Angell said some years
ago, "In a just sense and a large de-
gree the fortunes of the University
are committed to your hands."
Cognizant of the importance of this
relationship, William Dixon, '36,
president of the Men's Council, de-
vised a plan a month ago which
would aid students in becoming ac-
quainted with the functions of the
Alumni Association. It is this organi-
zation, founded in 1845, which holds
together the alumni of the University..
Its ramifications reach into virtually
every state in the form of University
of Michigan Clubs and its influence
is felt throughout the world both by
imilar clubs and by the printed ma-
terial it sends out, especially the,
"Michigan Alumnus."
This plan of educating students
towards the end ofdbecoming better
alumni seemed to be rather ambitious
until Dixon struck on the idea of us-
ing the various fraternities on cam-
pus, general and professional, as
points of contact for the proposed
plan.

Rules Addis Ababa

If.
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PRESENT ITAIIAN
POSSESSIONS
OLD ROMAN EMPIRE
AT GREATEST
EX TENT
jOTIER NATIONS
An interesting comparison1

EGYPTIAN
SUDAN
(FR.)
BELGIAN KENYA
CONGO 1/j4 (N.)

I

K=-- A

-Associated Press Photo.
between the Roman Empire of ancient

-Associated Press Photo.
Giueppe Bottai (above), gover-
nor of Rome, was named civil gov-
ernor of Addis Ababa by Marshal
Pietro Badoglio as he established
Italian rule over the former im-
perial Ethiopian capital.
wsley Wins Prize
In Boeing Contest
The fourth place award in the
seventh annual W. E. Boeing Scholar-
ship competition has been won by
Heaton B. Owsley, '36E. The schol-

Air Spectacle'
Will Be Staged
By Army Corps
Squadron To Demonstrate
Messages Between Planes
And Ground
The first "air spectacle" in years
>f Ann Arbor experience will be staged
tomorrow by the 107th Observation
Squadron of Selfridge Field, in co-
>peration with the University R.O.T.C.
Corps, over the open area between
Packard and Washtenaw streets just
south of the cut-off at the eastern
end of town.
Beginning at 2 p.m., the squadron
will participate in a unique demon-
stration of three types of communica-
tion between the ground and aircraft
in flight.
The most striking of the maneu-
vers will involve airplanes actually
icking up messages from the ground
with a hook and line. Two poles with
a line stretching between them, the
nessages attached to the line, con-
stitutes the equipment for this stunt.
A plane swoops down over the ap-
paratus and hooks the line, then
Irawing it up into the cockpit.
Another demonstration utilizes
panels -large strips and figures of
loth laid out in various configura-
tions on the ground-in the com-
nunication of specific messages to
irplanes flying directly over them.
A third demonstration involves the
use of radio. Capt. Merton Wallington
of Selfridge Field is in charge of the
ground crew, and Lieut. E. J. Kelly
s in command of the air detachment,
piloting a plane of the Observation
Squadron.
DELTA DELTA DELTA
Delta Delta Delta announces the
recent pledging of Jane Steiner, '38,
of Cincinnati.

times and Italian possessions today is provided by this map. All of
Ialy's colonies in Africa have been purchased or taken since 1900.
r'Iawa/ey Approves Government
Operation Of Electric Systems

Resource Conservation,
Ability 14. A7bSorb MHtge
Costs Cied As Benefits
By WILLIAM E. SHACKLETON
Presenting a power engineer's
views on the question of governmental
ownership and operation of electric
generating systems, Prof. R. S. Haw-
ley of the mechanical engineering de-
partment yesterday gave a qualified
approval to federal development of
such enterprises.
The chief advantage found by Pro-
fessor Hawley in having the govern-
ment build power plants lay in the
conservation of natural resources
which might be affected. Such proj-
ects as harnessing the lower portions
of the Mississippi would, in his opin-
ion, relieve to a considerable extent
the burden upon the coal, gas, and
oil reserves of the nation and also
prevent or check the carrying down
to the sea of millions of tons of
fertile soil.
Costs of building such huge hydro-
lectric plans would obviously be
very great, he pointed out, so that
no agency except the federal govern-
ment could hope to meet them. In
practically no instances could he
foresee that any of these construc-
tion costs would be repaid from sales
of power with rates near present
levels; actually, he declared, the in-
stallation of federal power plants
would almost invariably be paid for
from the national tax bill.
As basis for his belief that federal
operators of large hydro-electric
plants would never be able to pay
original capital costs, the efficiency
to be expected was discussed by Pro-
fessor Hawley. In the first place, he
believes, government will not run an
enterprise any more cheaply than
private companies do.
In the second place, he continued,
experience has demonstrated that in
most cases the lowest priced power is
secured with steam plants located
near the center of consumption rather
tfhan with hydro-electric stations
which usually have to set up long
transmission lines to distribute their
output. Thus federal hydro-electric
projects which would be able to sell
power in a competitive market would
probably just about meet operating
expenses.
However, Professor Hawley indi-
cated, a large portion of these in-
itial expenses could be charged to
flood control or in ome cases, irri-
gation.
One important, condition for fed-
eral building of hydro-electric plants
was made by Professor Hawley. That
was to have the planning and con-

siruction period extend over several
decades. By- this prolonged warning
ample opportunity would be allowed
private operators to write off through
the natural process of depreciation re-
serves their investment in plant and
equipment. Since most generating"
machinery wears out in 12 or 15 years,1
all that present power companies need
to do would be not to buy new equip-£
ment. This qualification would re-
move two of the principal bugbears
of businessmen faced by the govern-t
ment ownership issue, loss of capital1
investment and direct competition.
Going on to other aspects of gov-
ernment's part in the public utility
business, Professor Hawley advanced
"service" requirements as an advan-
tage of a municipal power system
over a private company. The latter,
he slid, under its franchise terms,
must always have available a sec-
ondary source of power for emergency
use. This usually means a high initial
cost of duplicating either generating
or transmission equipment. On the
other hand, municipal plants are
under no such obligation and expense;
if their service is temporarily dis-
rupted, there is not much that con-
sumers can do in protest.
Dice Reads Paper
Before Convention
Dr. Lee R. Dice, curator of mam-
mals in the Museum of Zoology, Dr.
W. H. Burt, assistant curator of mam-
mals, and Carolyn' Shaldon of the
martnology division will leave early
next week for Philadelphia where
they will attend the 18th annual
meeting of the American Society of
Mammalogists, May 12 to 16.
Dr. Dice will deliver two papers at
the meeting entitled "Fertility Re la-
tions in the Paromyscus leucopus
Groups of Mice," and "Waltzing and
Epilepsy in Deer Mice." Dr. Burt will
talk on "Studies on Populations and
Movements of Small Mammals."
BOOKLET NOT FOR STUDENTS
Contrary to previous announcement
yesterday, the new booklet edited by
Dr. F. E. Robins, assistant to the
president, will not be available for
C distribution to students. The book-
let was edited primarily to be sent to
High School principals in various
parts of the country.

In the past, it has been the cus- arship was won on the merits of a u
tom of the Alumni Association paper submitted by Owsley entitled: c
through T. Hawley Tapping, general "An Analysis of Operating Revenues 1
secretary, towexplain its functions to and Expenses on Airlines." i
the student body by means of the The Boeing Co. annually awards p
Union's student faculty meetings. four scholarships to students inap-
Dixon's notion of presenting the proved universities and collgees in
same material to fraternities in a the U.S., the award won by Owsley
program evolved ostensibly for the is the second won by a Michigan man
spread of information has meet with in the past few years, Robert E. n
gratifying success, according to Mr. Hayes, '33E, winning one of the o
Tapping. scholarships in 1933. The contest is
Since the introduction of this plan conducted on the basis of papers sub-
three weeks ago, 20 fraternities have mitted, which papers are judged by
been visited by the Alumni Associa- a committee of men selected by the
tion officials. Emory J. Hyde, presi- Boeing Co.
dent of the Alumni Association and Owsley will leave for Oakland, Cal.,
Robert O. Morgan, assistant secre- immediately after graduation for two
tary, have been visiting general fra- years of study at the Boeing School.
ternities while Mr. Tapping has
spoken mostly to professional houses. .:"
The alumni visitor speaks to the
members of the house after dinner for
about ten minutes, telling them the
aims of the Alumni Association and
explaining how these are carried out.
Not only seniors are invited to listen,
but all classes, because the purpose
of these talks is to inform the stu-
dent body, Mr. Tapping said.
With the growth of his program, it
was turned over to the Union which
now handles it.
WATCH FORr
0Jao~bsons
Announcement on
Sunday's Society Page
X V.
THIS is the one day of the
tunityto show how much
more than any other mean
ment to your Mother.
We Wire Flowers An
Two Pounds $1.00 I University
We handle all details of Opposite the M
mailing and guarantee delivery

100 Engraved $1 65
Cards & Plates
THE ATHENS PRESS
Printers
City's Lowest Prices on Printing.
308 North Main Street - Dial 2-]013

PAY SENIOR DUTES
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday in the An-
gell Hall lobby. It is obligatory to
have paid these dues to obtain Senior
Ball tickets or to Dave one's name
on commencement announcements.
ID (OLLEGE PENNANS
or REALITE PENCIL!
TEN snappy, pennants
-ideal decorations for
room or car or grip-now
free! Authentic deign'-
each pennant bears officia
seal of each University in
group. Now given with
each AUTOPOINT or REAL-
ITE pencil. Seven 10-pen-
nant sets altogether; each
set different; collect them
all! See AUTOPOINTS and
REALITES today, with the
exclusive easier-writing
Grip-Tip and modern sim-
plified mechanism that al-
ways works. Leads can't
wobble. All sizes, styles,
colors, 25c to $3.
AT ALLLEADING DEALERS
°7e Bettr Pe c t."'
THE FINEST ALUMINUM
1
No kitchen can be truly modern unless
its cooking utensils are modern, too.
The really modern kitchen should cer-
tainly include a set of new Matched
MIRRO, the finest aluminum. These
special prices make it easy for you to
add new notes of beauty to your kitchen
while enjoying time-saving convenience
and new fuel and food economies.
AND SAVE AT THESE
SPECIAL PRICES
SELF-MEASURING SAUCE PAN
2-qt. Saves time
by measuring
in the pan.
d PSPECIAL
-590Reg. 90c
Cove fit .... Sic
MIXING BOWL WITH LIP AND GRIP
Stainless ALUMILITE finish. 5-qt.
size. Light, unbreakable.
Reg.$1.50

EASY.-TO-CLEAN BROILER
Makes broiling as easy as frying.
Smokeless, ion-spattering.
~ S P EC IA L $159
Reg.
$1.95
13/ in. x 10in.
WHISTLING TEA KETTLE
CHROMIUM
plated. 4-qt.
size. A proven
convenience.
SPECIAL
Reg. $2.95
DOUBLE BOILERS
Improved design.
Ileat-proof bakelite
knob. SPECIAL
a 1-qt. $1 .39 Reg. $1.75
1. r -qt, $1 .59 Reg. $1.95
))2-qt. $1 .79 Reg, 32.25
3-PIECE COVERED PAN SET
1, 2 and 3-qt. sizes. Inset covers pre-
vent boiling over. Flat bottoms.
SPECIAL
52

I

year you have an oppor-
i you really care. Flowers
ns can convey your senti~
y where ii The World
FIower Sho
Jchigan Theater

_ _ _ _

II

DAY
Sunday, May 10th
0
Send her
Schroft-'s or Gilbert's
CHOCOLATES
We will wrap and
Mail or Deliver
for you.

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4
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MA

Y

DANCE

SATURDAY
RAINBOW ROOM
s Presenting:
MICHIGAN'S MAY QUEEN
Chosen as "The Most Attractive Girl on the Campus"

I

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