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April 24, 1936 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-04-24

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wo

1-1 E, WIMicNX DATINl

FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 1936

Graegermen Rescue Two In Mine Disaster

LATE
WIRE
NEWS

Bishop Attends
Library Meet
At Washinton
Conference Is Inportant
Iii Determining Library
Resources For Research
As chairman of the Committee on
Resources of American Libraries, Dr.
William W. Bishop, University librar-
ian, attended the meeting of the
committee held at the Library of Con-
gress in Washington last week and
which he termed the most important
yet held in the determination of the
library resources for research which
exists in U. S. and Canada.
Prof. Margaret Mann of the li-
brary science department was also
at the meeting which was attended
by the "cream;' of the library profes-
sion, Dr. Bishop stated.

CLASSIFIED AIE TA1i

1 - 1
Rep. McLeod Pushes
House Attack On WPA
WASHINGTON, April 23.- (')
A Republican demand that
President Roosevelt submit Gen-
eral Hugh S. Johnson's attack on
the Works Progress Administra-
ton to Congress was made today
as a fight to divert funds from
WPA to PWA continued to re-
sound.
Representative McLeod (Rep.,
Mich.), a member of the House
Appropriations Committee which
is considering the new $1,500,-
000,000 relief request, introduced
a resolution asking the President
to submit to Congress Johnson's
report on the New York City
WPA.
The report, which laid unpub-
lished on Harry L. Hopkins desk
nor many months, said the ad-
ministration of WPA there was
"cruel" and "stupid" and that
60 per cent of its projects were
useless.
G-Man Head Urges War
On '150,000 Murderers'
WASHINGTON, April 23.-(P)
-Asserting that in America to-
day there are "150,000 murderers
roaming at large," J. Edgar Hoo-
ver, chief of the Federal Bureau
of Investigation, tonight urged
upon the Daughter of the Amer-
ican Revolution a "war" on crime.
In a speech bristling with ma-
eabre statistics, Hoover called
upon the Daughters to "view with
keen suspicion the various so-
called economy moves by which
venal politicians disrupt police
departments." He asserted that
"political g r a f t e r s" are the
"brains behind the Dillingers of
the land."
At the outset, he conjured up
"the horrible picture of miles
upon miles of stiffened corpses
representing the 300,000 citizens
of America who today are walk-
ing the streets, not realizing they
are doomed to die by the foul
hand of the murderer."
Claim Addis Ababa
May Surrender
ROME, April 23.-() -An
Italian dispatch from Djibouti,
French Somaliland, late tonight
quoted Lieutenant Frere, a Bel-
gian military officer who was said
to have just arrived there, as say-
ing that Ethiopian officials had
decided to send a commission to
meet the advancing Italians with
a white flag and the keys to
Addis Ababa in order to avoid a
bombardment.
(An official communique issued
in the Ethiopian capital claimed
successes in both the North and
South for the Ethiopians.
(Members of a Belgian military
mission which had been training
the Ethiopian troops for five
years reached Djibouti Tuesday
after a dispute with the govern-
ment.)

CA SSIFIED
A DVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance Ile per reading line
(on basis of five average words to line)
for one or two insertions. 10c per read-
ing line for three or more insertions.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
Telephone rate - 15c per reading line
for two or more insertions. Minimum
three lines per insertion.
10 ~discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
By Contract, per line -2 lines daily,
one month .........................8c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months ............8c
2 lines daily, college year...........7c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months.............8c
100 lines used as desired..........9c
300 lines used asdesired............8c
1.000 lines used as desired..........7c
2,000 lines used as desired ........6c
The above rates are per reading line
based on eight reading lines per inch
Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
6c per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add
l0c per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7". point type.

NOTICES
NOTICE: We clean, upholster, repair
and refinish furniture. Phone 8105.
A. A. Stuhlman. 15x
MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
EYES examined, best glasses made at
lowest prices. Oculist, U. of M.
graduate, 44 years practice. 549
Packard. Phone 2-1866. 13x
SELL YOUR OLD CLOTHES: We'll
buy old and new suits and over-
coats for $3 to $20. Also highest
prices for saxophones and type-
writers. Don't sell before you see
Sam. Phone for appointments.
2-3640. lox
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Seven-room house, large
living room, fireplace, lots of closet
space. Finished attic, all conven-
iences, garage, shrubs, flowers, fruit
trees, off main highway. Must be
seen to be appreciated. Phone 3606.
Owner. 437
FOR SALE: Bungalow with large lot
140 frontage, fruit trees, and berry
bushes. Excellent well, garage. Off
main highway. Phone 3606. Owner,
i 438

,I NDRY
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned
Careful work at low price. 1x
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Eye gla-se. rimless, white
gold. Reward. Phone 6733. 439
LOST: Black Schaefer pen in either
Main Library or Le'ague. Initials,
M. Ganzhorn on pen. Call 5201.
440

-Associated Press Photo.
Entombed nearly ten days in the depths of a gold mine at Moose
River, N. S., Dr. D. E. Robertson and Charles Scadding were rescued by
courageous Stellarton Draegermen, one of whom is shown emerging from
the shaft built through 141 feet of rock and dirt.
Reaction Times Of Motorists
Tested By Machine At Union,

State Highway Department
Tests Drivers During
Safety Campaign
How quickly can you stop your car?
That is the question the device of
the State Highway Department set
up in the South Lounge of the Union
will answer for you after taking a
10-minute test, a part of a state-
wide safety campaign.
Under the direction of A. W. Car-
ick of the statedepartment the reac-
tion time, or the interval of time
it takes for the person driving to
take his foot off the accelerator and
press the brake, is estimated by the
"dummy" car.
According to the officials in charge,
the average reaction time is about .77
of a second, the extreme high being
two seconds, and the extreme low
being about .4 of one second. After
the reaction time is estimated the dis-
tance covered in that time is esti-
mated and this is added on to the
distance required to stop after press-
ing the brake lever to approximate
the total distance covered in stopping
a car.
Mr. Carick stated that "most people
think they can stop their cars in much
shorter time than they really can."
By the device in the Union it is pos-
sible to gain an accurate approxi-

mation of the distance required to
stop at the speeds of 20, 40 and 50
miles per hour under varying condi-
tions, such as wet, icy or muddy pave-
ments.
Furthermore, officials pointed out,
the device in the Union assumes that
'he automobile is in perfect condi-
tion, and that very probably the aver-
age car is not in its tip-top condi-
tion in regard to brakes, steering
gear, or other essentials.
The person being esceci by the
machine sits before a steering wheel
and depresses a "fake" accelerator
which starts a canvas drum revolving.
Painted on the canvas drum is a white
concrete road and a miniature auto
rolls on the canvas. The person being
tested must keep the car in the center
of the painted white ro'ad. A light
is flashed, and after seeing the red
signal the "driver" puts on his
"brake" as quickly as possible. A
neon clock records the reaction time.
The device has been taken to vari-
ous parts of the state, officials said,
and the state's purpose in setting up
the expensive invention is "to prove
to people that they cannot stop with-
in 10 or 15 feet or anywhere near
these distances, when going at the
normal speed of 50 miles per hour."'
It is part of a state campaign to
impress people with the necessity of
driving more slowly and more care-
fully, Mr. Carick emphasized.

One of the most interesting pro-
jects discussed at the meeting, Dr.
Bishop explained, was the success of
the union library catalog between the
Universities of North Carolina and
Duke, which are ten miles apart, and
the result of the joint catalog sys-
tem has been an increase of 1700 per
cent in borrowing between the two
institutions.
Use New Catalogue Method
At the meeting it was discovered
that certain groups of libraries were
pooling their card catalogs so as to
derive the greatest use of the collec-
tions among the libraries as well as to
facilitate borrowing. It was also ex-
plained that the Library of Con-
gress catalog numbers more than
nine million items.
The ultimate aim of the resources
committee it was stated, is to adopt
a program for the increase of library
resources and the distribution of
these resources to the best advantage
of research. It represents part of a
move to centralize information on
the material available for research
purposes.
Presides At Previous Meeting
The committee held a meeting in
Ann Arbor on Nov. 11, 1935, over
which Dr. Bishop also presided. The
committee, it was explained is also
concerned with the process of micro-
photography in the copying of books
and other material as a possibility of
simplification of its problem.
Others on the committee besides
Dr. Bishop are Andrew Keogh, Yale
University librarian, Robert Bingham
Downs, North Carolina University li-
brarian, Donald Coney, University of
of Texas library, David J. Haykin,
chief of the cooperative cataloging
and classification service of the Li-
brary of Congress and former chair-
man of the committee, Louise Prouty,
vice-librarian of the Cleveland Pub-
lic Library, and Malcolm G. Wyer,
librarian of the Denver Public Li-
brary.
Gertrude Coogan
To Lecture Today
Miss Gertrude M. Coogan, noted
economist and author, will speak at
8 p.m. today at the Masonic Temple.
Miss Coogan is a graduate of
Northwestern University, where in
1922 she received the degree of Master
of Business Administration. For
eight years she was employed by the
Northern Press Co. of Chicago as
statistician and security analyst.
Later, she established her own bus-
iness as ilnvestment and business an-
alyst.
She is the author of "Money Cre-
ators," an economic study of America.

8c

TYPING

434

Sense Of Humor Thrives Even
In Dull Courtroom Atmosphere

Typing
Phone 7728
Apt. B5 Anberay Apts.

"Eleven dollars and ninety-five
cents or 10 days in jail." (Obligato
gavel accompaniment.)
But while that is a frequent con-
clusion for many of the cases pass-
ing through justice and circuit courts
of Ann Arbor, there's many an occa-
sional humorous quirk that pervades
even the austerity and dignity of the
law, with many stories circulating
in the city and county buildings to
testify to these sidelights on justice.
One of f he most recent ones was
in the case of a Detroit youth, on
trial before Justice of Peace Jay H.
Payne for joy-riding in a car from a
used-car lot, speeding, and the old
favorite, "drunk and disorderly," who
was so obviously guilty that he de-
cided to draw on a host of past ex-
periences and defend his own case.
As the amateur attorney was draw-
ing forth testimony from one of the
witnesses, City Prosecutor Albert J.
Rapp got on his feet to object on
the grounds that the testimony being
sought was "immaterial, incompetent,
and (in Mr. Rapp's phraseology) ir-
revelant."
The youth took it all in, and later,
when the case was going adversely
for him during questioning of a wit-
ness by Rapp, the defendant-and-
DELICIOUS
APPETIZING
FOODS
and Sandwiches
Kruger's
KOSHER
DELICATESSEN
Restaurant
233 S. State At Head of Liberty

8c

OLD-FASHIONED
(a ielotliain (
refreshmnts
games of skill
100 hostesses
Dance to the Music of
CHARLIE ZWICK
Saturday, r4pril 25
8 -12
at Barbour Gym
.P E N NYI

defense-attorney jumped up pro-
claiming "I object."
"And on what grounds?" queried
Judge Payne.
"On the grounds that the testi-
mony is er, incompetent . . . imma-
terial, and . . . er , . . ah . . and er ...
What the hell was that third thing
he said, Judge?"
Another man, a 22-year-old young
man from Chelsea, is prominent lo-
cally for defending his own periodical
charges of "D & D," police jargon for
"drunk and disorderly." Athough at
present out of the lineup because of a
pressing 90-day engagement at Sher-
iff Jake Andres' Little Theatre, the
man in question has had such suc-
cess in convincing circuit court juries
of local townspeople that his little
pranks were not disorderly but all
in the spirit of fun that several fol-
lowers of his career are urging him
to take up criminal law in earnest
and form a partnership with one local
celebrity, Harry "Dodger" Collins,
who last year spent almost 300 of
1935's allotted 365 days in jail.
I .r

J Oo Engraved $
Cards & Plates.
THE ATHENS PRESS

11

5

-F
MA JEST IC
FOUR DAYS ONLY BEGINNING
TOMORROW
A DOZEN SING1G F OLS IN A
WHIRL OF LLAUGHSAND G-IRLS
The most sensational ine-up of
assorted entertainment talent
ever combined in a single
picture-even by \Vamner Bros.!

Printers
City's Lowest Prices on
308 North Main Street -

Printilng.
Dial 2-1013

'1

EVENING RADIO PROGRAMS

Germans Strong For
Hitler, Says Bietila
Continued from Page 1)
go out on the diamond in order to
stop all sundry hits that came toward
second base.
Speaking about skiing, Bietila felt
more at home. According to him,
the German people are very ardent
skiing fans. Children only four and
five years old in Garmisch-Parten-
kirchen go to school in ski uniforms,
and courses in skiing are given in
the schools. Bietila said that on
Sundays the mountainsides surround-
ng Garmisch-Partenkirchen looked
like they were covered with mos-
quitoes. Old people as well as young-
sters whiz along the German slopes.
Bietila was of the opinion that
the Norwegian skiers were the best in
the world. He remarked, however,
that the Japanese are progressing
very rapidly in skiing and he expects
them to furnish a real threat for
the 1940 Olympics.

t

6:00--WJR Jimmie Stevenson.
WWJ Ty Tyson.
WXYZ Key Ring.
CKLW Omar.
6:15-WJR Junior Nurse Corps.
WWJ Dinner Music.
WXYZ Sophisticated Rhythm.
CKLW Joe Gentile.
6:30-WJR Duncan Moore.
WWJ Newscast.
WXYZ Day in Review.
CKLW Melody Lane.
6:45--.WJR Hot Dates in History.
WWJ Rhythm Review.
WXYZ Lowell Thomas.
CKLW Song Recital.
7:00--WJR Musical Moments.
WWJ Amos and Andy.
WXYZ Harry Richman.
CKLW Phil Marley's Music.
7:15-WJR Jimmie Allen.
WWJ Speakers: Evening Melodies.
WXYZ Southern Gentleman.
7:30-WJR Jack Randolph.
WXYZ Lone Ranger.
CKLW Variety Revue,
7:45-WJR Boake Carter.
WWJ Royalists.
8:00-WJR Lennie Hayton's Music:
Guest Stars.
WWJ Jessica Dragonette.
WXYZ Irene Rich.
CKLW Sweet and Swingy.
8:15-WXYZ Wendell Hall.
8:30--WJR Broadway Varieties.
WXYZ Gold Bug.
CKLW Jack Hylton's Music.
9:00-WJR Hollywood Hotel,
WWJ Waltz Time.
WXYZ Music Guild,
CKLW Witches Tale
9:30-WWJ Court of Human Relations.
WXYZ Fred Waring's Pennsylvanians
CKLW Music Box Review.
10:00-WJR Richard Himber's Champions.
WWJ First Nighter.

WXYZ Girl Friends.
CKLW Serenade.
1):15--WXYZ Sammy Dibert's Music.
CKLW Csare Sodero Presents.
10):30-WJR Ma)rch of Timze.
WWJ Marion Talley: Orchestra.
WXYZ Adventures of the Hornet.
10:45-WJR Musical Moments.
WWJ Klein and Gilbert.
11:00-WJR Bulletins.
WWJ Bureau of Missing Persons:
Troupers.
WXYZ Baker Twins.
CKLW Freddy Martin's Music.
1:15--WJR Latin-Amerian Music.
WWJ World Observer.
CKLW Kay Kyser's Music.
WXYZ Sportgrams.
11:30-WWJ Kavanagh's Music.
CKLW Jack Hylton's Music.
WXYZ Lowry Clark's Music.
11:45--WJR Meditation.
WXYZ Bert Stock's Music.
12 :00-WJR Sam Jack Kaufman's Music.
WWJ Russ Lyon's Music.
CKLW Ben Bernie's Music.
WXYZ Shandor: Ranny Weeks'
Music.
12::30--WJR Guy Lombardo's Music
WXYZ Phil Levant's Music.
CKLW Joe Sander's Music.
1:00--CKLW Ted Weems' Music.
CAPTURE ESCAPED CONVICTS
JACKSON, April 23. - (A') - State
Prison of Southern Michigan officials
received word today that Frank
Shinn, who escaped from the old
prison in 1930, was under arrest in
St. Louis, Mo.

i
i
i
E
t
i
i

-'TATE JTREET
J EW EL ER
WATCH & JEWELRY REPAIRING

PROGRAM of
by FISK JUBILEE SINGERS
SUNDAY, April 26, 4 P.M. and 8:15 P.M.
at LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Get Reservations at Wahr's Bookstore, Box Office
or Call 3219 or 7784

I

Extra
NEW DISNEY CREATION!
"ELMER the ELEPHANT"
A Silly Symphony

'A



.T _s_ . _ _ .. _ _.... {

I

Last Day
"MOTIVE For REVENGE"
and
"THE 39 STEPS"
Continuous 1:30- 11 p.m.
15c to 6 --25c after 6
-- T(fmnorrow

The 1936
Dramatic
Through
JUNE 20
EsAelle WA wootl ~
Season Tickets NOW
ON SALE at Garden

. . .. . . . . .
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