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April 23, 1936 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-04-23

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PAGE SIX

TIHE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, APRIL 23. 1936

RAGE SIX THURSDAY, APRIL Z3, 1936

Professors Will
Attend Meeting
Of Association
North Central Convention,
Held In Chicago, Draws
Many Faculty Members
Several members of the schools and
colleges of the University have left
to attend the annual meeting of the
North Central Association of Colleges
and Secondary Schools being held
this week at the Hotel Stevens in
Chicago.
The convention will include meet-
ings of the various committees and
commissions of the association for
the discussion of "the scope, aims
and purposes of secondary education
with special reference to the young
men and women who have not been
able to find places in industry."
The following is a partial list of
the faculty members who have left
to attend the meeting; Dean Edward
H. Kraus of the College of Literature,
Science and the A'rts, Prof. George
E. Carrothers of the School of Ed-
ucation, Dr. Harlan C. Koch, assist-
ant director of the Bureau of Co-
operation with Educational Institu-
tions, Ira M. Smith, Registrar, Dean
James B. Edmonson of the School of
Education who has held the posts of
secretary and president of the as-
sociation, Prof. Calvin O. Davis of
the School of Education and editor
of the official publication of the as-
sociation and Prof. Clarence D.
Thorpe of the English department.
According to Dean Edmonson, the
University has always taken a very
keen interest in the work of the as-
sociation. The society was estab-
lished in 1895 through the continued
effoits of President James B. Angell.
Former Dean John R. Effinger of the
College of Literature, Science and the
Arts contirbuted to a large extent to
its development.
Award Honors
To Ann Arbor
School Papers
The National Scholastic Press As-
sociation, in a contest sponsored this
year by the journalism department of
the University of Minnesota, gave
Ann Arbor's two high school news-
papers, the University High School
Broadcaster ard the Ann Arbor
High School Optimist, high honors in
this year's awards to publications of
secondary schools.
The Broadcaster, edited by Stanley
Swinton, son of Prof. Roy S. Swinton
of the College of Engineering, re-
ceived an "All-American Honors Rat-
ing," the highest award in each class.
Only 16 such awards were made in
the entire United States for schools
with enrollments between 200 and
500.
The. Optimist was given a "First
Class" rating, next below the All-
American rating, in its own class.
Tickets For Party
Available At SCA
Tickets for the All-Campus Party
at 8:30 p.m., April 24, sponsored by
the Inter-Guild Federation should be
obtained at once from Lane Hall,
officers of the organization an-
nounced yesterday.
The party, including dancing and
refreshments, will be held in Lane
Hall. Tickets, now on sale, are 25
cents for a single person and 35 cents
a couple.

More than 100 students attended
the party last year ,and an even
greater number is expected this year.
Aside from dancing, other entertain-3
ment will be provided.
Student Alliance To Hear Speaker
Albert Hamilton of Los Angeles,
former president of the National
Federation of Methodist Young Peo-
ple will address the Student Alliance
at 8 p.m. today in Lane Hall.

Four Gunmen Shoot At Iowa Bank Official

Problem Of Student E f Help
And How The N. Y A leets It
(Continued from Page 4) in the v ar ions parofhe countr
- - - Sixth. 1h,0 1ot only should the;
icion of the students' work so that quotas to the . lica be raised. so'
they will really earn the funds made that more studers can be aided. butF
available to them. One possible way the amount of funds available to
of accomplishing this, according to a each student s'houild be increased..
c~ollege authority, would be to have Seventih I h there be a committee
in charge of le student aid program,
the college contribute, say, one-fourth on which the NYA students should
of the students' wages For example, have representation Students would E

si1holastic standing be selected. 1
Ninth, that provisions be made
whereby young people eligible for1
cilege aid shall be employed duringj
the summer months on NYA workz
projects in their home communities!
and thus be enabled to earn thez
tuition necessary for continuing in1
college.3
Tenth, that a plan of restrictedI
scholarships supplement the presentt
NYA program. Under this plan a
few of the most highly competent
students wvould be excused fromt the
work requirement,
And finally, that the payroll and

be the touchstone of our mutual en-
lea vous. Wha ever policy benefits
him most. that policy we should pur-
sue...W.We ae as ready as you to
make any changes that will enable
you to open up the greatest possible
number of opportunities to those am-
bitious, intelligent and industrious
young men and women who wish to
win for themiselves a college educa-
tion.

U tAC b LU l t VC .51: v~ +....,11 v ~1 .ttLA1 1 .3LtL 1 U'~.
if the students were receiving forty thus be allowed to help select the jobs timekeeping procedure be simplified.
cents an hour the NYA's share would at. which they work and determine *
beete the rates of pay. It is the young person as a student,
Stirty nts and th e colleges ten Eighth. that only students of high who, taken as an individual, should
have an interest in seeing to it that
the students worked hard at socially
1 desirable projects, closer supervision
would result. And this being the case,
the colleges might at the same time
be given a wider latitude in selecting 'CNE
the student aid projects.
Fourth, that there be greater flex-
ibility as to the requirements for "tUCKIES"
freshmen. The reason given for this PROPER
pioposal is that freshmen have a AGING
hard enough time as it is making aLUCKIES"
the necessary adjustments to collegeaSCIENTIFIC
life and that to required them to do BLENDING
any great amount of outside work is
to put them under a serious handicap. LUCKIES'
Fifth, that the program take into I

,
I
t

STEAM SH-I P
TICKETS &CUIES
Your steamnship passage to Europe, for this coming Spring A
Summer: should be reserved now, Phone or come in, choose
your ship 6 a small depov t will guarantee the space. if you find
you cannot go.,Itwill gladly arranger 1w a Transfer, or a full return
of deposit money. Ali daLls compled here. without char ge.
'-personal Service"~ on every Oo..4ng, since 1917. P1H. 6412
KUEBLER TRAVEL BUREAU. 601 E. Huron St. Ann Arbor

- A-,soiatod I'ressP oto.
Donald Nissen, assistant cashier of the Mcrningside Scate bank
at Sioux City, Ia., is shown pointing to the place in his cage where a
bar was shot out when he was fired upon by one of four gunmen who
robbed the bank of $3,292.
Henry Ford To Move Historcal

A A account the difference in the cost
Ann Arbor , H Iouse To UreenJieuLd of living and of a college education

Robert Frost Occupied Ol1 she said, re'sembles those which werej
Cottage As A Professor pcspuiar in lower New York In the
Az rTSL , T l40s5e, bccax;e : h s;_ lea lights

Made to Look
Like New A gain]

At~. i It unIiversity

A hundred-year-old cottage at 12231
Pontiac St., one of the best Mich-
igan examples of Greek revival archi-
tecture, has been purchased by Henry
Ford for Greenfield Village, and will
be moved there piece by piece within
a week.
The cottage has long been an Ann
Arbor landmark, and was occupied
by Robert Frost, when he was a mem-
ber of the University faculty. Some!
of the best of his poetry was written
while he was living there, including
the poems, "Spring Pools," "Ac-I
quainted With the Night," "Three by
the Pacific," "A Winter Eden," and
"A Minor Bird." Up until last week
it was occupied by Prof. and Mrs.
Frederick Aldrich.
Dismantling has already been
started on the house, and it will
be moved to the Village in another
week. It is expected that the erec-
tion of the cottage on the grounds
there will be completed in two or
three months. It will be placed on
the banks of the river along with
other , cottages of various types of
architecture, and will be used as a
club-house for groups of girls who
may stay there overnight.
The house is commonly called the
Thompson Sinclair House, althoughj
according to Director Emil Lorch
of the Architectural College, the
Haunted Tavern is really the house
which was built by Sinclair. How-
ever, the house may have been built
by Sinclair, a small politician who
lived in Ann Arbor for three or four
years.
Fiske Kimball, Metropolitan Mu-
seum expert, discussed the cottage
in an article for the Architectural
Record, written in September, 1922,
in which he gave the date of its build-
ing as 1843. He described the cot-
tage "as the finest example embody-
ing the use of circular columns of
correct detail to be found in this
section.
It has also been called the McCol-
lum House, and was owned by David
McCoaium for many years. He be-
queathed the house to his children,
xvho signed the rights to one of the
dauehters who lived there until her
death. Afterwards, her brother Al-
bert lived there, until his death in
1925.
Afterwards it was sold to George
Randel, who in turn sold it to Prof.
rya. rv Lurie, who is now a professor
at Columbia University.
According to Mrs. Aldrich, the
,couse is also known as a "hen and
.hicken" type of house, because of
the use of side wings. The doorway,

above the door as well as at the
sides,.
One of the most beautiful features
of the cottage, she pointed out, is
the panelling which has never been
renodelled. Much of the house was
remodelled but the original brass
doorknob, the floors and a circle of
plaster in the hallway ceiling still
remain. There is a circular stair-
way in the front of the house, and
there are two curves in the living
room walls to take care of the stair-
way.
Genuine
Orientals
CHOICE1

II:

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ROYAL BOKHARAS
KABISTANS . .
COSSAKS . .
ISBAHANS ..
SAROOKS . .
KIRMANS . . .

2x 4
3x 5
3x 5
2x 4
3x 5
2x 5

0 Every time clothes are
cleaned their freshness and
color are restored. Don't
neglect your clothes until
Mr. Moth damages your
things beyond repair. Phone
8722 today for a positive
cure to all moth threats.
Ph. 8722
BAN D BOX
121 East Liberty
LOtCCALY OWNED

I

Companions for life, they
brighten your rooms.
- THIRD FLOOR -

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Pd

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Pt
I
R A DIO$
10 7 E . WA5N

NO $
INSTRUMENTS
ol
CE 1852
TON P0I N Zt2

Y P_, it

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- . _
E 1 r - -- - - _ _ _____ _ _-_- -- -- -_ __ _ _ - ----_ -_

Pd

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Does Not Need To Be Chlorinated-
IT'S PURE AS IT COMES FROM THE GROUND ...
Deliver . v to yr Iome iHl cames o si; 2-i-l. hottles, or in large 5-gal hot imes.
Phone 8270 for Quick Service.

III-
s a

ARBOR SPRINGS
416 West Huron

WATER CO.
Phone 827 )

,r.. .

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ItsYO h
I. -;.

Carnus Cut- Rate Drug
218 So. S'late St. (Goldmnan Bldg. I'io 932 (We Deliver)
WEEK-ENTD SPECIALS
Ain Arbor'.s Aide;! Little Drug Store

" T
wants on
May 10th
Your Photograph
will give her the greatest joy and happi-
ness. May we suggest that you take ad-
vantage of our unusual portrait offer.

LUCKIES. (MMELS, O.Q.'s.

Takarmine
Tooth Brushes
6for
50c IODENT
Tooth Paste
|C
Reg. $1 50 Pennsylvania
TENNIS BALLS
3 for $1.1
Hermetically Sealed!
FRESH!
50c TEK
TOOTH BRUSHES

ILUCKIES. C AMELS, O.G.'s.,
CHESTERS. RALEIGHS
CIGARETTES
CARTON
a Plus ,e Ta>:
2 pkgs. 25c
50 Pad Matches - 9c
BEER
Your favorite btand
Properly chilled-
CUT-RATE PRICES
FILMS

KOTEX
or MODESS
1 9C
3 for 54u, 6 for $1
75c NOXZEMA
Reg 25c
WH ITE
Shoe Cleaners
Your Choice--
GOLF BALLS
Specialty Priced-
'f!i '

11

IIIII

I

II

Roll or pack- Sold at lowest

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