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April 05, 1936 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-04-05

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USUDA1YAPRIL 5,1934 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

P:' C Y R 1

Cross Section

Of Two

Civilizations

China, Nippon Nara Is Beckoning T
Popular Goals
Of Travellers
Speeidy3 Liner Scheduies
WitI Fkr Eat
Th1e lie o te O_".' with ts 1
age-old'nu>>) V Nh gilsand
pie ng x ivi of d in ruments,
is (hul i ;iguin ihs year as.
touti . Ivn ' cme opportunity to
view a s secion of two civiliza
tions, th ok supplaning the new,
as they e eideed in the daily
life of the tyl)ical Asiatic. Shrines,
elaborat e ombs. joyous festivals, tea
bou^es arid n1 u licoblred flowers on,
the one hai 01 contrasted with a
gieat i rial d(V1opment, cultur-
al renaio mc and a remarkable ed- x
U( tt ionai mnovemrent.
1 . ye Fi em Nurthern ort.
VanYc' er, San FranSsco and Los
Anle re I he usual ports of de-
pature i th rns-Pacific (traveler.
Via tbcdv7route. Which omits
awani a a port of call, Yokohama
can be ii(a in only ten days,
Nagasiki in twelvo ad Shanghai it-
sel[ in only fourteen. With these
speedy connections made possible, the-
proxem of the where-with-all to
meet the epenses of such an invit- The sacred lake and pagoda at
ing vacation is the last consideration the many interesting features of
that must be met. This is partially one cf tile country's earliest capita
solved by the reasonable rates now cultivated woodland stocked with
in effect w it h the major cruising a great bell tuinging in a pagodath
lines. A typical, one-month tour of
the Orient, which includes in its it-
inery China, Japan and Manchukuo, Keijo by the Japanese), are the pal-
costs only $650. All expenses, in-( ace of former emperors, Prince Li's
cluding hotel, train and boat fees, are household fine-art works, beautiful

o Japan's Visitors

sI

v aca a a., ~x cx u r v a ,.. w
taken care of in the initial outlay.
Charges range on upwards, depend-
ing on the type of accommodations
and kind of tour selected.
Those who first see Japan when
the sky is cloudless may deem them-
selves favored of the Gods. On ap-
proaching Yokohama on such a day,
the ocean is hazy azure, the sea is
dotted with islands and sampans
manned by little native fishermen.
Rising above the scene, revealed in
all her beauty, towers Fujiyama. Yo-
kohama itself is the gateway to the
Orient for the traveller from North
America. Teeming with activity, it
is a monument to Japanese progress
with its broad boulevards and mag-
nificent buildings.
Tokyo Modern Capitol
Tokyo, the capitol of the Empire,
where Japanese life and civilization
reach their zenith ,is only a fifty-
minute train-ride from Yokohama.
Vibrant with contrast, it is a modern
capital which has lost none of its
oriental charm. Modern buildings
are evident, and nearby, surrounded
by a centuries-old moat, is the Im-
perial Palace of the Emperor, the
heritage of the ages. Ueno Park, and
the Imperial Museum, the Art Gal-
lery, the Zoological Garden, the Asa-
kusa Temple and the many shrines
are on the "must see" list when vis-
iting the capitol of the land of the
Setting Sun., Only four hours from
Tokyo, but a thousand years in time,
is Nikko, a holy place since 766 A.D.
The nearby river roars under its
Sacred Red Lacquer Bridge, noted for
its exquisite carving.
Journeying on to Miyanoshita, one
arrives at Yokohama's famed hill re-
sort. Delightful excursions from this
resort and many recreational facili-
ties combine to make it one of the
mon, pleasant districts in Japan. The
favorite excursion is that to Lake
Hakone. Once there you gaze across
this charming lake, beyond the rug-
ged mountains on the western side
and view t ,he sacred Fujiyama. The
glorious outline sweeps in one curve
from seashore to sky as one surveys
it from the Seven Views."
The Land of the Morning Calm
and The Hermit Kingdom are two
designations for the land known to
the Western World as Korea. In
the present capitoi, Seoul tcalled

Lotus ponds and the famous big bell.
Half-a-day's journey from Seoul is
Kongosan, the diamond mountain, on
which are situated age-old monas-
teries and temples.
Visit Mukden
Continuing the tour, you then pro-'
ceed up the Korean Peninsula,
through Antung on the Yalu River
and thence to Mukden. Your in-
terested in Mukden will be quickened
when you realize that it is situated in
the eventful and history-making land
of Manchukuo or Manchuria. Turn-
ing south-west, one passes through
the Great Wall, through the interna-
tional port of Tientsin to Peiping, the
capitol of China which was formerly
known as Peking.
The first view of Peiping should be
from the top of the outer grey wall,
50 feet high and 40 feet thick-a wall
already old when Columbus dis-
covered America. A great city breaks
against it. Straight ahead there is
another city of vast, yellow-roofed
palaces that perk up at the corners.
The inmost city has a pink wall
around it and long, white marble
bridges-the Forbidden City, now
open to foreigners. Still a fourth city
crowds up against the wall from the
south, from whose strange blending
of slums and palaces arises the
triple-domed Temple of Heaven. It
is constructed of blue tile and capped
with gold.
Shanghai, the Paris of the Orient,
is reached either by rail via Nanking'
or down the Yangtze River by steam-
er, both routes offerin ga variety of
attractions. Once in Shanghai, one
finds as bizarre a city as any in the
world. Its impressive, modern sky-
line lies behind the swarms of highly
colored junks and sampans. The Bird
Market at the Old Walled City, the
much-pained Lake Si-Wu and Hang-
chow are only short distances from
Shanghai and offer considerable en-
joyment to. those who will only take
the trouble to leave the fascinating
foreign life in the city.
EUROPE - $282
All Expenses Included - 4Countries
IRE VBOOKLETS
KIRBY'S TRAVEL BUREAU
Dine Bank or Generai Motors Bldg

-Courtesy Canadian-Pacific.
beautiful Nara, in Japan, are two of
a trip through the Orient. Nara,
als, is noted for Nara Park, a. vast,
hundreds of tame deer, and for
ere.
New Zeppelin
Is Assigned To
North Atlantic,
Europe for your Spring Vacation -
not just a possibility but soon to be
a reality!
Not that the Board of Regents has
decided to lengthen the vacation per-
iod, but Hamburg-Arrvrican and
North German Lloyd, acting as agents
for Deutsche Zeppelin-Reederei Ge-
sellschaft, have announced a zeppelin
schedule across the North Atlantic
on a 60-hour basis.
The LZ-129, recently tested in
Germany and now on its way to
South America on a trial flight, will
be put into service on a regular
transatlantic passenger run between
Frankfurt-am-Main and Lakehurst,
N.J.. in time to make ten round
trips between May and October this
year. It has now been christened
the "Von Hindenburg."
Duration of the westbound voyage
will be about three days, and for the
eastbound voyage two and one-half
days. Seville may be included as a
port of call on the journey.
Cost of the trip one way is $400
each for occupancy of a double room
by two passengers, and $680 for sole
occupancy of a double room. Round
trip rates are $720 and $1224. The
Lakehurst-Seville flight would be $40
less in each case.
The "Graf Zeppelin," somewhat
smaller than the "Von Hindenburg,"
has now been carrying on a regular
fortnightly Europe-South America
service for four years, between April
1 and December. The flying time
from Frankfurt to Pernambuco is
three days, from Frankfurt to Rio
de Janeiro four days, with a complete

Sugar Island Is 'C
Said To Offer
Great Beauty
Observer Suggests Ways
For Greater Usefulness
To University
(Continued from Page 3)
fire loss was suffered in 1931 and
1933.
This work in forestry, together with
a survey made by some of the stu-
dents of the landscape department
under the guidance of Prof. Harlow
0. Whittemore, with an eye toward
future development, and the work of
Dr. Steere and Mr. Hermann, thus
far constitute the only uses the Un-
versity has made of the Osborn tract
since it was presented in 1929.
The Regents accepted the gift with
the resolution "that this land shal
for the present be used principally
for research and instruction in the
natural sciences and forestry," but
the realization has now come thet
the tract can be of wider service to
the entire University.
The land is ideally located for re-
search, but is not being considered
for summer instruction in most of
the biological sciences because, chief-
ly, of the lack of normal ecological
associations mentioned before and
because ample facilities already exist.
The application of the land which
suggests itself to this writer is that of
a summer colony for faculty and ad-
vanced students in any of the fields
of arts and sciences where natural
surroundings might present a favor-
able background. It would be a fit-
ting concomitant to the program of
building a nucleus of young writers
here in Ann Arbor through the Hop-
wood prizes if the University pos-
sessed a summer camp where a group
of picked young writers could study
under an inspiring teacher, under
ideal conditions. Similarily, a colony
for artists in other mediums might
well be a distinguished addition to
Michigan's Summer Session. As a
retreat for faculty families, Sugar
Island offers boating, swimming,
fishing, perhaps in the future other
sports-and most precious of all-
isolation.
Plans for the gradual expansion
of the use of the Osborn Preserve as
a center for summer investigative
and instructoral work from the Uni-
versity are now under way under the
general direction of Prof. Louis A.
Hopkins, director of the Summer
Session. The adaption of the
grounds to accomodate a summer
camp as suggested above would re-
round-trip flight every two weeks.
Seville and Pernambuco are ports of
call on the trip.
The "Graf Zeppelin" at the end of
1935 had made 437 trips, including
104 ocean crossings and a voyage
around the world, and had amassed a
total mileage of more than 650,000
miles. There had in that time been
carried "safely and promptly, with
almost clock-like regularity, and re-
gardless of weather conditions," ac-
cording to officials, a total of 27,900
persons, over 5,500,00 pieces of mail,
and 92 tons of cargo.
A case of air-sickness has never
occurred on the Graf Zeppelin since
it was first put into service, its
officers maintain. This, they ex-
plain, is because zeppelin airships
are free from rolling, pitching, and
other "unpleasant motion."

III

-ill

MAIKE YOUR SPRING

I"

Traveling This Summer?
hae CnMldian Pacific offers very attractive trips and tours for
Suinmiet vacation travellers. Check your favorite and return
this advertisement:
t 1. EUROPE, 30 days, 4 countries..........$280.00
L ? 2. EUROPE, 37 days, 6 countries........$409.00
S3. EUROPE, 51 days, 8 countries .. . $..x529.00
L j 4. ORIENT, 45 days, 6 ports complete .. . $405.00
[r5. ROUND THE WORLD, . passage home
town to home town ..............$541.56
6. SOUTH SEAS, Honolulu, Suva, Australia,
New Zealand, passage ...............$260.00
( } 7. ALASKA, from Vancouver, 9 days.... $90.00
j 8. 9-DAY CRUISES, Montreal to N. Y.....$70.00
9. CALIFORNIA-Banff-Lake Louise .... $149.00
If you want just the ocean trip without shore expense in Europe,
the Orient, or Around the World, we have some very attractive
fares.
See Your Local Agent, or

VACATION

10 DAYS LONG

Our Rates Compare Favorably With Rail.
Round Trip, DETROIT To -

Albany ... 53.27
Buffalo ... .22.95
Boston .. $73.73

"Chicago . $23.85
Miami .. 160.85'
ew York. 62.46

St. Louis . 48.96
*NOTE - Lv. Ann Arbor for Chicago 12:25 P.M.
return to Detroit. ROUND TRIP FARE - $22.50,
AME RICAN AIRL IN ES

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