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April 03, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-04-03

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TL~ HEMICiI~AN DULY

HRIDAY, APRIL 3, 193E

. . . . . . . .................. ........ .............. . ..............................

Great Britain's Majestic Liner Completes Test Trip

LATE
WIRE
NEWS

$3,200,000 Sought
By Alberta Premier
EDMONTON, April 2. -(A )-
Efforts of Premier William Aber-
hart to arrange a loan for re-
demption of Alberta's $3,200,000
bond maturity continued tonight.
A Federal government guarantee
to back the loan was an essential
part of pending negotiations.
Asssistance in the form of $2,-
650,000 advance was proferred by
the Imperial Bank of Canada.
There was only one condition at-
tached to the offer that the Do-
minion government guarantee the
principal.
Finance Minister Charles Dun-
ning said at Ottawa yesterday
that failure of the social credit
leader to commit himself to a'
loan scheme precluded the pos-
sibility of Dominion financial aid.
Borah Demands Probe
Of Relief Set-Up
WASHINGTON, April 2.- (')
- A nation-wide investigation of
charges of politics in the WPA
was demanded tonight by Senator
Borah even as Harry L. Hopkins
was saying he would have been
"a plain damn fool" to appoint
state administrators not "friend-
ly" to the New Deal.
Hopkins, however, indignantly
denied what he termed "implica-
tion" that the 3,800,000 needy on
WPA work relief rolls - as con-
trasted with administrators -
were chosen according to political
affiliations.
"I've yet to see the case - I
don't say there isn't any - where
a fellow got his job on relief
rolls because of politics," he as-
serted.
Street Car, Auto Crash
Injure Four Detroiters
DETROIT, April 2.-(tP)-Nine
persons suffered cuts and bruises
tonight when an automobile col-
lided with a street car at Balti-
more and Woodward Avenues,
and burned.
Four of the injured were in the'
automobile which Harry Lock-
man,15, the owner, said he bought
recently for $5. The others were
in the street car, which was
damaged so badly it had to be
towed to the car barn.
G..P. Regulars Trim
Borah Men In N.Y. Vote
ALBANY, N. Y., April 3. -(Fri-
day) - (P) -Regular Republican
candidates for seats at the Na-
tional Convention took a 5 to 1
lead in upstate New York contests
early today over candidates
claimed by Senator Borah.
The calculation is based on
early and scattered returns.
First returns from New York
City came from the 15th Congres-
sional district where the regular
organization gained a 3 to 1 ad-
vantage over the Borah organiza-
tion leaders, Rep. Hamilton Fish,
Jr., and William Zeigler, Jr., for-
mer treasurer of the Republican
state committee.
Maine Republicans
To Back Col. Knox
BANGOR, Me., April 2. - (A) -
The Maine Republicanconvention
tonight ratified at slate of 13 na-
tional delegates unpledged but
"disposed" party leaders said, to
support Col. Frank Knox, for the
presidential nomination "as long
as he has a chance."
State Chairman A. Eugene Se-
wall said that with one possible

exception the delegation now was
favorable to the candidacy of the
Chicago publisher and he believed
the entire group would be in ac-
cord at the Cleveland convention.J

Scholarships
Are Re eived
By 3) Seniois
foon tinned xrom 1Rage 1)
A. Kunze, elect rical engineering,
Giovanni Giovannini, English, Jack
W. Conklin, English, Alexander P.
Ruthven, fine arts. Arthur R. Kook-
er, history, Lester C. Houck, latin,
Robert W. Wagner, mathematics,
Adam H. Spees, physics, Charles H.
Crudden, psychology, Arthur C. Tur-
geon, romance languages, Reeve M.
Bailey, zoology, Jean Brierley, zool-
ogy, and Maurice E. Bates, majoring
in mechanical engineering.
Special Fellowsnips were also an-
nounced. The Emma J. Cole fel-
lowship in botany was awarded to
Dorothy C. Carpenter of the Uni-
versity; the Lawton fellowship Li
astronomy to Victor A. Goedicke of
Michigan; the F. C. Newcombe and
Susan Eastman fellowships in plant
physiology to Lowell F. Bailey of
Southern Illinois State Normal Uni-
versity; and the Angeline Bradford
Whittier fellowshop in botany to
Mary E. Wharton of the Unversity
of Kentucky.

11

Classified DirereWroy.

4

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
kdvertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close at five
)'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance 11c per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions. 10c
per reading line for three or more
insertions. Minimum 3 lines per in-
sertion.
relepione rate -15c per reading line
for two or more insertions. Minimum
three lines per insertion.
00%/ discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
y contract, per line -2 lines daily,
one month ..............8c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months......8c
2 lines daily, college.tyear......7c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 mnonth~s.. ..8c
100 lines used as desired .. ..9c
300 lines used as desired........
1,000 lines used as desired.........(
2.000 lines used as desired .......
The above rates are per reading line
based on eight reading lines per Inch.
Conic type, upper and lower case. Add
Sc per line to above rates for all capital
Letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add
1.c per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7% point
type.
FOR RENT -ROOMS
FOR RENT: Suite with private bath
and shower. Also single room,
shower bath. Phone 8544. 422 E.
Washington. 417
LARGE front room, single or double.
904 Packard. Phone 5134. 421
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. lx
OSTENSON MADE INSTRUCTOR
Burton T. Ostenson, Hinsdale fel-
low in the Museum of Zoology, was
recently appointed instructor in zo-
logy at Michigan State College, it was
announced yesterday. Mr. Ostenson
will begin his new duties Monday.
_ _..__ _ _ _ __ I

NOTICES
WILL the gentleman who returned
the purse to 21102 East Ann please
call11at noon1. 423
MAC'S TAXI--4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
EYES examined, best glasses made at
lowest prices. Oculist, U. of M.
graduate, 44 years practice. 549
Packard. Phone 2-1866. 13x
NOTICE: We clean, upholster, repair
and refinish furniture. Phone 8105.
A. A. Stuhlman. 15x
SELL YOUR OLD CLOTHES: We'll
buy old and new suits and over-
coats for $3 to $20. Also highest
prices fbr saxophones and typewrit-
ers. Don't sell before you see Sam.
Phone for appointments. 2-3640.
lox
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Brown smooth-leather coin
purse, initials N.E.S. and zipper top,
somewhere between Liberty and E.
Ann. Reward. Phone 2-2346.
LOST: Diamond ring on or near cam-
pus, about March 20. Reward. Call
Marion Morton, 3554. 422
ADAMS TALKS IN COLUMBUS
Prof. Henry F. Adams of the psy-
chology department will be guest
speaker for the psychology section of
the Ohio College Association tonight
in Columbus. Professor Adams will
address the group on "The Appeal in
Advertising."
'Personal STATIONERY
One Hundred SHEETS and
One Hundred ENVELOPES
Printed with Name & Address
THE CRAFT PRESS
305 Maynard St Phone 8805

!r

-Associated Press Photo.
Before the eyes of nearly 1,000,000 persons, Great Britain's super-liner, the Queen Mary, was towed slowly
down the Clyde river from her construction berth at Clydebank by two powerful tugs. Despite grounding twice,
the ship completed her hazardous journey and began test runs before her maiden voyage to the United States
in May.

Weary Professors Find Haven
In University Club Activities

Bridge And Reading Are
Most Popular Recreation
Of Faculty Members
Sharply contrasted to Greek letter
societies and other social groups, the
University Club, located in a large
room in the basement of Alumni Me-
morial Hall, has the distinction of
being perhaps the most self-effacing
and subdued club on the campus.
Its main purpose is admittedly to
serve as a haven for harassed pro-
fessors. It is a place where they can
drop in during the afternoon or eve-
ning for a spot of tea, a rubber of'
bridge, or to glance through the New
York Times in the quiet of a con-
genial room that is without a radio
or any other source of distraction.
This manifest quietude may account
for the large number of engineering
professors who are included on the'
list of 192 members, most of whom
are now, or were formerly, on the
faculty.
Activities provided for the members
range from the more thoughtful di-
versions like chess, checkers, smoking
one's pipe or favorite cigar, or read-
ing "Field and Stream" to the lighter
pastimes of bridge, whist, cribbage,
billiards, pool or bottle pool. Bridge
and reading are indulged in most
frequently, according to Melvin Kra-
mar, '38, one of the attendants.
Dues of $10 a year are collected
to defray expenses and allow mem-
INVESTIGATE LOBBYING
WASHINGTON, April 2.-(A)-The
Federal Communications Commis-
sion, investigating possible lobbying
activities of the A. T. and I., heard
mentioned in documents the names
of Senators Glass, (Dem., Va.) and
Kean, (Rep., N.J.)

bers to buy tea and biscuits, coffee,
hot chocolate, lemonade or ice cream
for the modest sum of five cents. Be-
sides these refreshments, the mem-
bers have a penchant for salted pea-
nuts, of which they consume an aver-
age of five pounds every two weeks,
according to Kramar.
After the quiet, the next thing that
characterizes the University Club is
the completely masculine atmosphere
that extends from the well stocked
cigar counter to the magazine counter
in the opposite corner. Pipe clean-
ers are held in small containers that
also provide matches and small for-
ceps for cutting the tips off cigars.
Taken as a whole, these little things
account for the affection with which
faculty men. speak of "The Club."
Faculty InI-Lead
I Gargoyle Vote
Ballots in the Gargoyle "Flashiest
Dressed Man on Campus Contest"
were counted yesterday and it was
revealed that the faculty has two
strong representatives in the contest
which ends April 10.
Number one man thus far is Prof.
Donal Hamilton Haynes, of the
journalism department, with his
faculty confer Charles E. Koella of
the French department a threaten-
ing second.
Other leaders in the polling so far
are Charles F. Kennedy, '36E, titian
Theta Delt; Walter D. Woodward, '37,
who also answers to "Woofwoof";
Bill Farsworth, '39, and Steve Mason,
'38, both of Phi Kappa Psi.

Bruno's Hopes
Fade As Grand
JuryAdjourns
(Continued on Page 2)
leaves the fate of Hauptmann, most
authorities believe, up to Governor
Hoffman; and his hands appeared to
be tied by rulings of the attorney
general's office that he lacks power
for a further reprieve.
Col. Mark O. Kimberling, prison
warden, who postponed the execution
from last Tuesday until tonight, can-
not delay it on his own authority
longer than the end of "the week of
March 30."
Wendel remained in jail pending
disposition of the original complaint
charging murder.
Wendel was turned over to the
Mercer County authorities late last
Saturday and was arraigned late that
night on the murder complaint signed
by Chief of Detectives James Kirk-
ham. The arrest was made by Bur-
lington County Detective Chief Ellis
Parker, a friend of Governor Hoff-
an.
Detective Parker, told of the grand
jury's action, said:
"I've done all I can. I turned over
the results of my work to the Mercer
County officials, and if they do not
see fit to act, there's nothing I can
do about it."
Asked if he would take any further
action, he said:
"No. Positively no."
The last witness to be heard by the
grand jury in a session that began
before 10 o'clock yesterday morning
and did not end until 11:40 p.m., was
the accused man, Wendel. He was
in the room three and a half hours
and came out cheerful.

EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS
6.00-WJR Buck Rogers.
wwJ Ty Tyson.
WX:Z Contrast in Music.
CKLW Omar.
6:15-WJR Junior Nurse Corps.
WWJ Dinner Music.
WXYZ Sophisticated Rhythm.
CKLW Joe Gentile.
6:30-WJR Duncan Moore.
wwJ Bulletins.
WXYZ Day in Review.
CKLW Melody Lane.
6:45-WJR Hot Dates in History.
WWJ Musicl Moments.
WXYZ Lowell Thomas.
CKLW Old Bill.
7:00-WJR Myrt nd Marge.
WWJ Amos and Andy.
WXYZ Harry Richman.
CKLW Shadows on the Clockc.
7:15-WJR Jimmie Allen.
WWJZSpeakers: Evening Melodies.
WXYZ On Parade.
7:30-WJR Jack Randolph.
WXYZ Lone Ranger.
CKLWV Variety Revue.
7:45-WJR Boake Carter.
wwJ Trinidad Singers.
8:00-~WJR Freddie Rich's Music.
WWJ Jessica Dragonette.
WXYZ Irene Rich.
CKLW Gabrielle Heatter.
8:15-WXYZ Wendell Hall.
CKLW Jack Hylton's Music.
8:30-WJR Broadway Varieties.
WXYZ Red Nichols' Music.
CKLW Pop Contest.
8:45--WMBC Polish Hour.
9:00-WJR Hollywood Hotel,
WWJ Waltz Time.
WXYZ Al Pearce's Gang.
CKLW On Review.
9:30-WWJ Court of Human Relations.
WXYZ Fred Waring's Pennsylvanians.
CKLW Music Box Revue.
10:0O-WJR Richard Himber's Champions.
WWJ First Ni diter.
WXYZ Girl Priends.
CKLW Serenade.
10:15--WXYZ Musical Moments.
CKLW Cesare Sod-vro Presents.
10:30-WJR March of Time.
WWJ Marion Talley: Orchestra.
WXYZ Adventures of the Hornet.
10:45-WJR Musical Momients.
WWJ Klein and Gilbert.
1.1:00-WJR Bulletins.
WWJ Bureau of Missing Persons:
Troupers.
WXYZ Baker Twins.
11 :15-WJR Latin-American Musiv.
WWJ Sports Celebrities:
World Observer.
CKLW Anson Weeks' Music.
WXYZ Sportgrams.
11 :30-WWJ Kavanagh's Music.
CKLW Jack Hylton's Music.
WXYZ Lowry Clark's Music.
11:45-WJR Meditation.
WXYZ Henry Biagini's Music.
12:00-WJR Barney Rapp's Music.
WWJ Russ Lyon's Music.
CKLW Ted Fio-Rito's Music.
WXYZ Shandor: Ranny Weeks' Music.
12:30-WJR Guy Lombardo's Musls.
WXYZ Phil Levant's Music.
CKLW DeMarco's Music
1 :00-CKLW Ted Weemns' Music.

.--.w._ ,-.----. _.. _ ._.__ _.

A'

Ili

Kruger's
D[LICATESSEN
Restaurant '
233 S. State At Head of Liberty
Sunday Specials
ROAST LONG ISLAND
DUCKLING AND
CHICKEN DINNERS
MEALS for the
PASSOVER HOLIDAYS
will be served from
April 7th to April 14th

Continuous 1:30 .11 p.m.
15c to 6-25c after 6
Now Playing
First Ann Arbor Showing
"FEDERAL AGENT"
-and
"Make A Million"
Extra
OSWALD CARTOON
LATEST NEWS
Saturday
lbfW AYRES
'Leathernecks Have Landed'
KAY FRANCIS
'I Found Stella Parrish"

I -

wa

4 DAYS ON LY
STARTING
POWERFUL TOMORROW
DRAMA of Life's History!
CONDEMNED TO A LIVING DEATH
FOR A CRIME HE DID NOT COMMIT!

ART CINEMA LEAGUE
Presents
Rene Clair's Comedie Francais
"THE LAST
MILLIONAIRE"
with English Titles
"A witty political satire which clev-
?rly applies barbed slapstick to roy-
ilty and the modern Fascist State."
-New York Times.
Charlie Chaplin
in
"THE FIREMAN"
Lydia MENDELSSOHN
Theater
Saturday, April 4, at 8:15-10:15
Tickets 35c; All Seats Reserved
---a_

Think a Minute !
Everybody's ReadifngThe
Michigan Daily Want Ads !

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Balcony at Night

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Young Love Takes a Wild Gamble!<::=r"
There's a thousand laughs
and one big palpitatingh
heart-kick in this ninety-.
mile-an-hour romance
With GENE RAYMOND
WK1fl nYRA RRIE

For As Little As-
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for a three-line
ad inserted one
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Nmjchg3n DoailY
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