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March 19, 1936 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-03-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4"1

TILE MICHIGAN DAILY

Second Safety
Vault Of Tyler
Found Emptied
Seek Assets Of Convicted
Embezzler Confiscated
Last Autumn
DETROIT, March 18. - (") - The
search for $349,000 in embezzled city
trust funds ran into fresh difficulties
today with discovery that a second
safe deposit box listed in the name
of Harry M. Tyler had been emptied
and the key surrendered three weeks
before the shortage was brought to
light.
The fact that the assistant city con-
troller, who committed suicide last
Thursday, had rented a second box
was determined by a statistician who
examined papers left in his desk. In-
vestigators moved at once to obtain
court permission to open the box, but
leained that Tyler gave it up Feb.
17.
The first box opened Monday a
few hours before Tyler's funeral, shed
little light on the mystery of what
became of the money.
William J. Curran, city controller
and Tyler's superior, said Tyler told
him last autumn that he had placed
$108,000 recovered from the embezzler
of welfare funds, in a safe deposit
box. Curran said he ordered Tyler
to deposit the money in the bank.
He expressed belief the second strong
box was that in which Tyler had kept
the money recovered from Lewis' as-
sets.
The city held to its position that
the embezzlement was a theft from
the National Bank of Detroit and that
the bank was responsible. In a formal
statement signed by the mayor it
called on the bank, and in particular
James J. O'Shea, assistant vice-pres-
ident of the bank, to acknowledge an
"error in judgment or the misuse of
authority or the lack of knowledge on
the part of their vice-president, Mr.
O'Shea," as being responsible for the
shortage.
Debaters Start
Practicing For
ChicagoMeeet
Varsity Will Meet Detroit,
Wayne, Michigan State
Before Tournament
Varsity men debaters have been
holding practice debates in the past
week and will visit Wayne University,
the University of Detroit and Mich-
igan State College, to hold practice
debates with them in preparation for
the Western Conference Debating
Tournament to be held April 3 and
4 in Chicago, A. E. Secord, Varsity de-
bating coach, said yesterday.
In the past week the debaters have
upheld the affirmative of the question
with Albion College and Bowling
Green University, "Resolved: That
Congress Should be Empowered to
Over-Ride by a Two-Thirds Vote De-
cisions of the Supreme Court Declar-
ing Acts of Congress Unconstitu-
tional." Michigan will uphold the af-
firmative of this question in the
Big Ten tournament in Chicago. 1
Michigan will take a six-man squadF
to Chicago, according to Mr. Se-
cord and these men will be announced
Wednesday. The schools Michigan
will compete with are Minnesota,
Iowa, Indiana, Purdue, Ohio State
and Chicago. The debates will be
held at the University of Chicago, Mr.
Secord said.
PAGING MR. HEARST

ST. LOUIS, March 19. - A recent
survey at Washington University in-
dicates that college seniors there are
five per cent more radical than first
year men.
Wake-oUp!
GOOD WEATHER is here
to stay. A freshly cleaned
wardrobe is the best way to
start the Spring season. Try
our quality cleaning service.
-HOUR EMERGENCY
CLEANING AND
PRESSING
SERVICE
o (-all ew a n olnp-

Father Coughlin's First Shrine Destroyed fly Fire

, ..

rtcr" " Tstis a artof h.ROUfBLE AT VASSAR
ck OU(IKllPS. N. Y_. Matrch 18.

i s g_ d a ,r i u ''t'h ',Iua ' r w ill ~ v i T ; ."r ('0(1 i:. t I a of- l i-1
May "il .'() Ht de II . RiJfl.:111u Ilitat i ikit f n Ic

Pr444vI'1 A ain
Returning to the campus again fdo
ter a week's sojourn, the inquiring re-

tors of students passing by to or from and a half in their average height in
their classes will be Dorothy Shap- the last 15 years and the return of
pell. '36, Dorothy Ohrt, '36. and Grace the long evening gown to fashion
Gray, '3' have created a serious clothes closet
When the program was broadcast situation. The college engineer has

porter will again be accosting stu- a week ago, tho question asked was, rccen ly made arraigements to have
dents at :5 . my a ig hem "Wha is your opinion of the sub- the (lot(lhes racks raised four inches
o biod:e 'wi .iions a;bout 1idization of college athletes? By in all the dormitory closets.
turrent prb.,' _ trolugliout the subsidizing I mean the helping of
athletes by giving them financial aid,
State over' WJlt. scholarships. or employment." Of the given only two or three times each
Sponsored by the Universit y Broad- 11 students who spoke, six were year, Professor Abbot said, the ques-
asting Service, under the direction against subsidization in any form. tions asked usually being devoted to
of Prof. Waldo Abbot, the "inquiring "Inquiring reporter" programs are , campus activities.

r

-Associated Press Photo.
Fire, apparently originating from faulty wiring, deff;cyed the original Shrine of the Little Flower at Royal
Oak, Michigan, the church of Rev. Charles E. Coughfin. He estimated the loss would approximate $30,000.
The dome of the new slitine can be seen in the back i r und, with ruins of the old shrine in the foreground.

Novelist And Social Worker

IDAILY OFFICIALI

Kagawa To Lecture Here Soon BULLETIN
(Continied from Page 4)
Wrote Forcefully While vember. At the time he was suffering from 9_until_12 'clock.- Admissio
IOa trachoma of the eye and was for- from 9 until 12 o'clock. Admission
Im~prisoned On Jap Slum hliddin entrance into the United 35 cents.
Situation States by immigration officials. After
a special petition for entrance had Art Section of the Faculty Women's
Who is this man Kagawa that is failed, he was granted permission by Club will meet at 2:45 p.m. on Friday.
coming to Ann Arbor next week? President Roosevelt to come into the March 20, Michigan League. Profes-
country. sor Jean Paul Slusser will give an il-
swred i briefsterms ne cit 'of Kagava, as alrlady mentioned. has lustrated talk on "The Art of Water-
sweredim brief terms. One critic of color.''
Toyohiko Kagawa's books, of which devoted much time to the betterment
there are a score, described this Jap- of cOndiions among his Japanese
anese as a state'sman,-social worker comrades. Not only has he tried to daylihMr2at 4:15iplmeeinFth(
and novelist. In addition to this con-I day, ,March 20, at 4:15 p.m. in the
ndoelstIn addivitios, Kto ths ameliorate the housing conditions League. The program, to which the
lomeration of activities, Kagawa has themselves, but has tried to improve{ public is cordially invited, will consist
become recognized for his work in the conditions and wages of laborers of a colloquium on the subject, "Lit-
the field of consumer's cooperatives, and peasants, which he believes are erature and Dialectical Materialism.'
A great part of Kagawa's life has the fundamental causes for the slums. Mr. Herbert Weisinger will lead the
been spent in fighting the abominable Yet Kagawa has never resorted to or discussion.
conditions in the slum areas of Japan. advocated violence, and because of
According to his biographer, William this fact, has lost many of his co- Phuladclphian to address Friends:
Axling, Kagawa was once arrested workers.,PasmrEhintoarFiens
and placed in jail during one of his Commenting upon that fact, Kaga- I Pmember of the Society of Friends,
campaigns for better living during a wa said, "Man canot be saved through from Philadelphia, will speak to the
strike. In his cell, Kagawa produced opposition and violence. Violence can- Ann Arbor Friends on Sunday, March
such forceful writings upon the slum not be rationalized. Economic move-127 Ametn fowrsiwllb
conditions in the large Japanese cities ments and social reconstruction are a held at the Michigan League at 5:00
that he was released and the govern- growth."pM
mentproisedto ackhim xtesive grw .p.m., after which Mr. Elkinton will
ment promised to back him extensive- Kagawa will be in Ann Arbor for a speak on "The Friends' Fellowship
Japanese government kept its wordrm series of lectures on March 25. 26, 1 Council and the World Conference of
for over government was granted ford, and 27, and is being brought here by Friends." Supper will be served af-
frovrm f $10,000,00 wasgratedndr athe Martin Loud lectureship commit- teirward in the Russian Tea Room. All
program of bettering social condi-te
tions. tee. interested are welcome.
Kagawa was placed at the head of
the project and to him belongs much!
of the credit for the great improve-
ments in the living conditions in six As Exh ilera ting as a Walk in the Country
Japanese cities, Tokyo, Osaka Yo- A R BuMR PRGW A TER
kohama, Kobe, Kyota, and Nagoya. g--aKK
The tour around the country by
Kagawa at the present time does not Deivered to your holoe in cases ofsix? -q hot. t.es, or in tarpg 5 -ga. bottles.
mark the first time that this Japan-
ese has been in the United States. He Phone 8270 for Qukk Service.
was formerly a foreign student in this'
ARBRSR ,IN " GS WATER CO.
country, attending Princeton Uni-
versity for two years. However, an in- 416 West Huron Phone 8270
teresting sidelight occured when Ka-
gawa entered this country last No- ~ ~- ~- - -

f

4

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THE SHORTER OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY (2 Volumes) ...........18.00
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THE NEW WEBSTER !NTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY (Thin Paper).........27.50
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A til C ^&I nr rrfVA \-. Ir% . rrrn-- im.-- n--.-

Copyright 1936, The American Tobacco company

"AHT SOKE
OF RICH, RIPE-BODIED TOBACCO
Luckies are less acid. For hun- the resulting reports offer the pro-
dreds of years, tobaccos were fessional buyer an accurate guide
selected--and gradations in flavor and reinforce his expert judgment
secured-by the roughest sort of based on the senses of sight, smell,
rule of thumb methods. Hence, and touch, Thus extreme varia-
one of the most important inno- tions toward acidity or alkalinity
vations made by the Research are precluded by such selection
D1epartmen t was provision for and subsequent blending.
chemical analysis of selected to- Luckies-A LIGHT SMOKE
bacco samples before purchase: -of rich, ripe-bodied tobacco!

lackies areless
g g memo

f " cenTt cI -'ca :?8" t s
that e p t~o a#d

. .
;,a.
3',
I
i
I

7

Excess of Acidity of Other Popu
iL1C KY ST R!K E
B R A N D C
[BRAN D 0 _

acid
tar Brands Over LuckyStrike Cigarettes
, m

4

y RF
a'f= ,I

...................................................
..................................................
....................................................

ESULTS VERIFIED BY INDEPENDENT CHEMICAL LABORATORIES AND RESEARCH GROUPS

I

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