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October 04, 1935 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-10-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAIEY

THURSDAY,;OCTOBER 3,1935

Wolverines Continue Drills Against Spartan Passing

Attack

Kipke Lines Up
Yearling Team
AgainstVarsity
Regulars Also Undergo
Offensive Dummy Drill
Under Oosterbaan
SavageIs At End
First Team Line-Up Stays
Unchanged; Everhardus
To HandleSafety Job
That Coach Harry Kipke intends
to have his Varsity eleven well-pre-
pared for the passing attack that
Michigan State is expected to launch
in Saturday's game was evident at
yesterday's practice as the Wolverines
were put through an intensive drill
against Spartan pass plays exhibited
by a freshman team for the second
consecutive day.
"Get eleven farmers!" was the war
cry ringing on Ferry Field as Captain
Bill Renner led his team mates in
mastering their assignments against
the intricate Spartan maneuvers.
Offense was by no means neglected,
however, as Assistant Coach Bennie
Oosterbaan took first the second and
then the first-string eleven aside for
a dummy offensive scrimmage against
the reserves, with both new and old
plays the order of the day.
Savage Replaces Meyers
One change was made in the line-
up that started practice Tuesday.
Mike Savage, two-year letterman, was
back at right end in place of Earl
Meyers. Savage and Matt Patanelli,
flanking the other side of the line,
cauised the yearling backs a great deal
of trouble throughout the afternoon.
Th remainder of the Varsity line-
up remained thesame, with John
Viergiver and Mel Kramer at the
tackles, Frank Bissell and Bud Han-
shue at guards, and Bob Amrine at
center. Capt. Renner, Cedric Sweet,
John Smithers, Chris Everhardus
and Stark Ritchie did the chores in
the backfield.
As long as Everhardus remains in
the lineup, he will play the safety
position. If Ritchie sees action, he
will take Capt. Renner's place at
defensive right half, with Renner
mboving to the back position.
A second Varsity eleven was also
given a chance against the Spartan
plys. The team had Meyers and Art
Valpey at ends, Earle Luby and Jim
Licoln at the tackles, Fred Ziem
and Jesse Garber at guards, with
Stfan Shuman at the pivot position.
The backs on this team were Bill
Barclay, Bob Campbell, Skinny Nel-
son, and Steve Remias.
Rinaldi Has Cold
The Health Service Infirmary
claimed Joe Rinaldi, Varsity center,
yesterday. Rinaldi, who has been out
of uniform all week with a cold, is
expected to start Saturday, but his
lack of practice will undoubtedly be
a handicap.
Injuries have played a large part
in determining the faces in Michi-
gan's lineup for the State game, but
the Spartans of East Lansing are
having plenty of trouble on their own
hook.
Dick Edwards, speediest of the fast
State backs, is definitely out with
torn ligaments in his knee, and now
it appears that Kurt Warmbein,
Coach Bachman's triple-threat ace
and 'a thorn in the side of the Wol-
verines for the past two years, may
also see Saturday's game from the
bench. Warmbein has a separation
in his shoulder, and while he appears
to be perfectly capable of performing
his many tasks, the nature of the in-
jury is such that it may recur at any
time, with permanent results possible.

COACHES HAVE SHORT LIFE
WASHINGTON, Oct. 2.-(AP)-
The average "life" of football coaches
at major colleges during the past

Galan's Double In First Inning Is Initial Hit Of Series

ri

The HOT
STOVE
By BILL REED

11

Wildcats Meet Purdue In First
NightGame Of Big Ten History

II

It

STAY-AT-HOMES, unable to get
World Series tickets for various;
reasons, contented themselves yester-
day morning by disguising their base-
ball enthusiasm with tales of the past.
There was the story, originally told'
by Ernie Pederson of Grand Blanc
and father of the current Ernie, who
was himself a Varsity guard as an
undergraduate. Back in his playing
days, equipment was less plentiful
than at present, and there were but
eleven helmets to outfit the entire
Michigan football squad. One night
early in the season, during the prac-
tice season, one of the Varsity ends
became infuriated with Coach Yost,
tore off his head gear, and threw it
viciously at the Old Man. The Old
Man, however, knew how to handle
the situation, he picked up the hel-
met, turned and gave it to a reserve
player, and walked away without a
word. The quick-tempered Varsity
player showed an uncovered head
to the spectators for the remainder of
the year.
And there was the story, taken
from the repertory of the late Rockne,
which bears application in the Mich-
igan camp these days with Coach
Kipke's avowed intention of cutting
down on the beef trust at the guards.
When the Notre Dame football can-
didates reported one year, Rockne
asked the guards to step to one side,
and little Bert Metzger, who made
All-American in his senior year while
weighing 155 pounds, was there in
the midst of the typically bruising
guard candidates.
"A little small for a guard, aren't
you," Rockne asked Metzger, but 'the
little fellow came right back, "Yea,
and I'm a little tough, too."
Track is not forgotten, and the
story is told of foul play at the West
Virginia Relays a few years ago. The
track there is built something like
that in Yost Field House, with an
overhanging balcony, and no judges
were on the track in the dark shadows
of the balcony. During one of the

By RAYMOND GOODMAN
When the Purdue football team '
meets the Northwestern eleven at
Evanston this Saturday night, it will
not only mark the opening of the
1935 Western Conference grid sea-x
son, but also the first Big Ten foot-1
ball game under the lights in the his-1
tory of the association.k
Despite the fact that this change
was brought about by the threat of,
competition that the fourth Worldr
Series game, which is scheduled to
be played on Saturday afternoon at
Wrigley Park, home of the Chicago
Cubs, would undoubtely offer, and
not as a purely progressive step, this
new development in "big time" foot-
ball still retains its importance.
With the announcement, ticket
sales improved considerably and a
large crowd is expected by officials.
Night practices are planned by both
coaches and the Purdue band of
125 pieces is going to bring collegiat-
ism under the lights with some illu-
minating effects that were recently
developed. The lighting equipment
used in the Chicago Bears-All-Stars
game is being installed in Dyche Sta-
dium to provide the necessary illu-
mination.
This beginning in night football
closely parallels the start that the
Cincinnati nine made when it in-
troduced night basebal linto the ma-
jor leagues this summer. The ven-
ture proved a profitable one for the
Reds.
For three or four years minor
league clubs have made use of night
baseball with encouraging results. In
larger towns small colleges and uni-
versities have boosted gate receipts
by the same method.
It was only logical that this season
some major eleven should make the
same experiment. Universities lo-
cated in large cities and which draw
the greater part of their crowds from
the "home town" may find the illu-
minated field the same aid that it
relays one of the runners, hiding
himself in the shadow, stepped out
when his opponent came even, slugged
him with his baton, and went on
to win literally in a walk.

has proved to baseball and the smaller
schools as well as the professional
grid teams.
To the school located in a town the
size of Ann Arbor the opportunity is
not so great for the crowd comes from
neighboring cities and the student
body. Northwestern, Chicago, Ohio
State, and Minnesota are all in large
towns. The adoption of night football
will allow the grid fan who is pre-
vented from attending the afternoon
game by his job to actually see the
battle.
Dizzy Dean To Ask For
$27,000 In '35 Contract
SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Oct. 2.-(P)
-Dizzy Dean will demand $27,500
from the St. Louis Cardinals in his
1936 contract, he said here today
The elder Dean said he was offered
$20,000, an increase of $1,500 over his
1935 contract, early this week.
"But I think I'm entitled to more
than that," he declared.

I

F

-Associated Press Photo.
Opening the first gme of ihe World Series with a double, Augie Galan started the Cubs off to their first
win. Galan drove Rowe's third pitch over second. Billy Rogell made a gallant attempt to field the ball but
it got away from him rolling into center field, where Jo Jo White retrieved the ball and threw to second a
fraction of a second to& late to catch the fleet Chicago outfielder. Galan scored when Rowe; threw wild to
first after Billy Herman had laid a sacrifice bunt down toward third, the throw hitting hIerman in the back.

Varsit Court
Practice Will
OpenOct.) 21
According to announcement yester-
day by Coach Franklin C. Cappon,
varsity basketball mentor, Michigan's
delegation of hardwood candidates
will first be called for practice Mon-
day, Oct. 21.
Several weeks of stiff drilling will
precede the season which does not
open until after the first of December.
Changes in the rules governing the
play of the pivot man on the foul
line necessitates a new style of at-
tack being formed. John Townsend,
star of last year's freshmen cagers,
was particularly effective as a ball
handler under the old rules but until
practice is' well under way this sea-
son Cappon will not know if the In-
dianapolis boy will be as valuable
with the new set up.
Only two lettermen, Al Plummer
and Russ Oliver, were lost by grad-
uation and as a result Cappon is
expected to turn out a team that will
set a new high in Michigan's court
activities in recent years. The re-
turning lettermen, headed by Capt.
Chelso Tomagno, will probably form
~the greater part of Michigan's team
unless sophomores, who as freshmen
often impressed onlookers with their
fast play, prove good enough to take
over the starting positions.
Long Shot Takes
Jerome Handicap
BELMONT PARK, N. Y., Oct. 2. -
(R) - Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt's
Good Harvest, carrying the feathery
package of 107 pounds, electrified the
crowd here today when he led home
a highly regarded field of three-year-
olds to pay 25 to 1 in the time-hon-
ored Jerome Handicap. The gelded
son of Epinard, out of the money in
all his races since he scored in a Class
C Handicap at Aqueduct early in
July, flashed from a rear position to
beat out H. P. Headley's big colt,

14! Sports
The Intramural sports Depart-
ment sponsors two programs for
the Independent students, the "All-
Campus" competition and the "Inde-
pendent" competition.;
The "All-Campus" program has
thirty four individual sports. Indi-
vidual sports are those sports thata
are not necessarily team sports, as
tennis, swimming, and wrestling.
Students wishing to enter these sports
should turn in their names to the Ac-
tivities Office of the Intramural
Sports Building.
The "Independent" team participa-
tion is essentially an All-Year com-
petition, the winner being deter-
mined by the point system. Although
it is almost necessary for a team to
enter a majority of the sports offered
to be a potential All-Year winner,
teams may, and many do, enter only
those sports in which their team
members are particularly interested.
There are four ways in which an
individual or group of individuals
may participate in the "Independent"
program: (1) an individual may elect
himself manager and select certain
individuals to play with him; (2)
several individuals may band together
and enter a team; (3) a number
of individuals may form a team under
a club, city or state organization;
(4) an individual not having any
connections may hand his name in
to the Intramural office, and the de-
partment will place him on a team.
Fifteen medals are awarded to the
team winning the All-Year cham-
pionship. Ribbons are given to first
and second place winners in each
sport.
If you are interested in entering
a team, or entering individually, in
any or all of the sports offered, hand
your name in to the Intramural Ac-
tivities office. Notices will be sent
to you regarding the games.
All entries for the All-Campus

Frosh Track
Squad Begins
Fall Practice
With 50 men already reported and
as many more expected before the
end of the week, freshman thinclads
are beginning their fall training pe-
riod under the direction of Coach
Ken Doherty.
The first two weeks will be spent
in preparation for a Varsity-Fresh-
man meet, Oct. 16 and a handicap
meet also between the Varsity and
Freshman squads Oct. 25.
Distance men on the team will be
eligible to compete in the fraternity
and all-campus cross-country runs
which are scheduled for Oct. 30
and Nov. 5 respectively. These runs
which are approximately 2% miles
in length will be held over the reg-
ular course on the University golf
links.
Coach Doherty believes that the
strength of the team will lie in the
track events and urges all applicants
for field events to report to him at
the Yost Field House as soon as pos-
sible.
EQUIPPED FOR ALL
The Cardinals are well equipped
to face left-hand pitching. They
can put a complete team of right-
hand batting regulars in the line-up
with their three turn-around hit-
ters, Frisch, Collins and Rothrock.
tennis tournament should be sent in
to the Intramural Sports Building
immediately. First round matches
will start at 4:15 p.m. this afternoon
at the Ferry Field tennis courts.
There will be a meeting at 7:30
p.m. tonight in room 302 of the Mich-
igan Union for all students interested
in playing soccer. Anyone interested
in playing who is unable to attend
the meeting should phone the Intra-
mural Sports Building.

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MILTONS CLOTHES have long
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