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February 02, 1936 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-02-02

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PAGE ElG1t I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1936

PAGE EiGHT SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 193~

..

Symphony Will
Take Six Week
Tour Of South

Music Assistant To
In Fifteen States;
Johnson Directs

Play
Thor

The University Little Symphony,
composed of fourteen assistants in
instrumental instruction in the School
of Music, will leave the campus
Thursday for a concert tour through
the southwestern and southern por-
tions of the United States.
* The Little Symphony, unique in
collegiate music centers, was organ-
ized in the fall of 1934, and has been
active in concertizing throughout this
state. Last year this group made its
first concert tour which included
eighteen appearances outside the
state of Michigan. This year this or-
ganization is appearing in fifteen
states. While on this tour, the Little
Symphony will play in Columbia, Mo.,
Springfield, Mo., Tulsa, Oklahoma
City, Stillwater, Bristow, Blackwell,
Norman, Oklahoma; Dallas, Texas;
Shreveport, Louisiana, New Orleans,
La.; Hattiesburg, Miss.; Tuscaloosa,
Ala.; Asheville, Charlotte, Winston-
Salem, Greensboro, Durham, Raleigh,
N.C.; and also at numerous eduea-
tional centers. The Little Symphony
will play nearly sixty concerts during
its concert itinerary of five weeks. On
the return of this organization to the
campus, it will give the second of its
series of Sunday evening concerts in
the League, the date of which will'
be announced later.
This organization is under the mu-
sical direction of Thor Johnson with
John Krell, '38SM, as manager. Most
of the members of the Little Sym-
phony occupy first chair positions
with the University Symphony which
is conducted by Dr. Earl V. Moore,
Musical Director of the School of
Music. Soloists with the Little Sym-
phony on this tour are Ruby Pemert,
violoncellist, Romine Hamilton, vio-
linist, and Raymond Kondratowicz,
pianist.
The personnel of the Little Sym-
phony making this concert tour in-
oludes Romine Hamilton, concert-
master, John Mosajgo, violin, Charles
McNeill, violin, William Bagwell, viola,
Ruby Peinert, violoncello, George Ha-
ley, string bass, John Krell, flute and
manager, Charles Gilbert, oboe, Karl1
Farr, clarinet, Vlasta Podoba, bassoon,
Joseph White, French horn, Maylan
Jones, trumpet, Raymond Kondrato-
wicz, piano and tympani, and Thor
Johnson, conductor.
Honors Course In
Journalism Offered
Newspaper Direction (Journalism
110), an honors course in journalism, 1
will be offered for the first time next
semster by the department .of jour-
nalism. The members of the class
will include seniors, selected on thea
basis of their scholarship, and grad-
uate students now candidates for the
master's degree.
The course will be taught by Prof.
John L. Brumm and Wesley H. Mau-
rer, and permission of the instructors
is necessary for enrollment. It will
enable men students to carry on pro-
fessional editing activities and to as-
sist in determining public policy, news
values and display in connection with
the publication of The MichiganI
Journalist, the department's labora-
tory newspaper. The course carries
two hours credit.I
ORGANIZE REGIMENTAL BAND
Organization of the First Regimen-
tal Band, subsidiary unit of the Var-
sity-R.O.T.C. Band, was completed
recently with the election of officers.
Those elected were: Robert Ashe, '37,
president; George Hill, '37SM, vice-
president; James J. Gribble, '38, sec-
retary-treasurer; George Roach, '39,
quartermaster; and Arne Koljonen,
'37SM, librarian. The band is directed
by Clyde Vroman, '37SM.I

Education Bulletin
Will Be Ready Soon
The February issue of the School
of Education Bulletin will be read
for distribution within the next few
days, according to Dean James B
Edmonson.
Members of the faculty of th
School of Education have cooperate
to include in this publication timely
discussion of problems facing th(
field of education. The editorial in
the February issue deals with the im-
portance of administrative education
4with relation to public education in
the state of Michigan. A discussion
of needed changes in secondary edu-
cation is projected by Dean Edmon-
son.
Prof. Campbell
Ends 15 Years
At University
Drama Authority Leaves
Soon To Take Up New
Duties At Columbia
(Continued from Page 1)
somebody to spend a litte money for
political and literary club houses."
Professor Campbell stoutly defend-
ed the literary college here, denying
that it has degraded itself by reduc-
ing its educational standards. "Cer-
tainly it is utilitarian. Anything that
isn't is not worth while," he asserted.
"But I don't mean utilitarian in the
narrow sense. The liberal arts col-
lege must have an intellectual pro-
cess, and I don't think the intellec-
tual attitude here has been lowered.
In fact, if anything, it has been in-
creased because of the depression.
Students realize that they can't suc-
ceed whether they know anything or
not. And as a result they really get
down to business much more than
they used to."
Denies 'Big Classes'
Professor Campbell admitted that
he has one complaint and was glad
of an opportunity to air it.
"It's the big classes," he confided.
"A professor can't get acquainted
with his students when he lectures to
a class of 200 or more. All he does
is stand up and put on a show." He
decried the fact that there are not
enough opportunities here for pro-
fessors to meet students socially and
intellectually.
But despite the large classes, Pro-
fessor Campbell thinks the atmo-
sphere is less formal between students
and faculty men than it was when he
first came here. "It has always been
good," he said, "and probably better
here than on most campuses."
Praises English Department
He laughingy acknowledged that
he thoroughly enjoyed his work at
Michigan. "Sure I have a good time,"
he said "I always have a good time."
Professor Campbell most enjoys on
this campus his assistance in build-
ing up graduate work in the English
department. "We now have one of
the best graduate English depart-
ments anywhere," he said proudly,
"and I guess I derived the most sat-
isfaction out of helping to make it
so."
His work at Columbia will be the
kind he loves most -with graduate
students. He will teach but four
hours a week, lecture in Shakespeare
and have four seminars a week. At
the New York Public Library and
at the Columbia Library he hopes to
be able to carry on the research he
started at the Huntingdon Library in
California last year.
HONOR STUDENT DEAD
Word was received by the presi-
dent's office yesterday of the death of
Elwood Mead, 78 years of age, who

was given an, honorary degree at
Commencement here in 1925, Dr. F.
E. Robbins announced yesterday. Mr.
Mead had been irrigation specialist
and Federal Reclamation Commis-
sioner for more than 10 years and
had spent a half century in irriga-
tion enterprises.

$tudents Questioned
a,
(Continued from Page 1)
-ourse, students named thecourse
in Constitutional Law (121,122)
taught by. Prof. Jesse S. Reeves,
which covers the actual legal and
judicial interpretations of the Con- I
stitution. This course was cited as a
good one to combine with History 143
and 144 for a comprehensive study
of the document which today gov-
erns America. "If you're a good Dem-
ocrat or New Dealer, take Vander-
velde, but Reeves gives you the Su-
preme Court and Republican view
)f it," one student commented.
Other students were anticipating
political science 154: Government
and Politics of the Far East, and 153:
Colonial Government and the Prob-
lems of Imperialism, both to be
taught by Prof. Joseph R. Hayden,
who is just returning from the Phil-
ippines where he has served as vice-
governor for more than two years.
Foreign Policy of the United States
(164) by Professor Reeves was also
recommended as a valuable course for
evaluation of current events.
Sociology Courses
Prof. Robert C. Angell's Social In-
stitutions (Sociology 163) was recom-
mended by students as a course treat-
ing pertinent social questions not
easily recognized in contemporary af-
fairs. Another popular subject was;
Criminology (141) which, however,
is taught only in the first semester.
Psychology as a subject for study,I
one student says, is "especially inter-;
esting because it really gives the;
student insight into himself and oth-
er human beings." Courses recom-
mended were 33 and 34. Physiological
and Experimental Psychology, and
42: Psychology of the Abnormal and
Occult from Prof. Walter B. Pills-,
bury.
Other students recommended as a
good combination Greek 164, by Prof.
Cambell Bonner (The Greek Drama
in English Translations) and Latin
50: Latin Literature in English, as
"excellent survey courses giving a
modern viewpoint of Greek and Lat-
in literature.''
Fine Arts, Music
Fine Arts was cited by many stu-
dents questioned as "one of the most'
interesting subjects you can take'
up." Fine Arts 101, the introductory
course, was recommended as an ex-
cellent survey course, while for more
advanced work students suggested'
Dr. Plummer, a newcomer to the de-
partment.
Music 41: Introduction to Musical
Literature, commonly known on
campus as "Music Appreciation," was'
described as "a good cultural course,"
essential to the completion of a real-
ly well-rounded education.
The courses named above are by
no means intended to be a complete+
list of interesting courses, nor does1
an omission from the list signify that
some other course is not equally val-
uable. These named are merely the
ones selected by the students who
were questioned as among the most
interesting they had taken.

exception of small children, is invit-
ed:
Overture to "Lenore," No. 3, Op. 72
. . Beethoven
Concerto for Violoncello and Or-
chestra in B minor, Op. 104 ...
....................... D vorak
Allegro
Adagio
Allegro moderato
Hanns Pick
"Spanish Caprice," Op. 34.. ...
............ Rimsky-Korsakoff
Alborada
Variation
Alborada
Scene and Gypsy Song
Fandango of the Asturias
(played without pause).
Events Of Today
Stalker Hall: Today. Wesleyan
Guild meeting at 6 p.m. Miss Mildred
Sweet will lead a discussion on "To-
day's Challenge to Christian Youth."
Fellowship hour and supper at 7
p.m.
First Methodist Church: At 10:45
a.m. today Dr. Brashares will talk
on "How to Spend Your Life."
First Baptist Church: 10:45 To-
day Mr. Sayles will speak on "If Ye
Love Me" and the sermon will be fol-
lowed by the Communion Service.
Church School at 9:30. Dr. Water-
man's class at Guild House at 9:45.
Reger Williams Guild: No noon
class today. At 6:00 p.m. Students'
meeting at Guild House. Mr. Chap-
man will speak on "How to Become
A Christian." Refreshments and so-
cial hour.
First Presbyterian Church: Today.
Meeting at the Masonic Temple, 327
South Fourth Ave., Ministers: Wil-
liam P. Lemon and Norman W. Kun-
kel.
9:45 - Westminster Forum. Mr.
Kunkel will lead the discussion on
the theme, "Religion and the Fear
of Failure."
10:45 - Sermon by the Rev. John
Mackay, D.D., of New York City.
5:00-Westminster Guild 'study
hour, Dr. Lemon leader. The sub-
ject will be "Creative Christianity"
and reports of this meeting will fur-
nish the basis for discussion at the
regular meeting at 6:30. The usual
fellowship supper will be held at six
o'clock.
Congregational Church: Today:
10:30. Service of worship and relig-
ious education. Mr. Heaps will give
the first in the series "Four Pertinent
Parables," the subject being a "Par-
able of Duty-the Bondservant." Pro-
fessor Preston Slosson will begin a
series of lectures of "American Men
of Action," speaking on "Lee, Cham-
pion of Duty."
Church of Christ (Disciples): To-
day:
10:45 a.m. Morning worship - Rev.
Fred Cowin, Minister.
12:00 m. Students' Bible Class -

Survey Picks [DAILY OFFICIAL
Courses For BULLETIN
Second Term (Continued from Page 4)
Ivioloncellist, as soloist, will play the
following program Sunday afternoon,
Slosson's History 92 Most at 4:15 o'clock, Hill Auditorium, to
1which the general public, with the
Ar~rrviPnl . RV - - -

. L. Pickerill, Leader.D on on
the teaching~s of Jesus.
The social hour and supper will
be discontinued during the three
Sundays of the examination period
6:30 p.m. The discussion program
will be held at the Guild House, 438,
Maynard St. Topic: *What has hap-
pened to my religion since coming
to the University?"
Harris Hall: Thcreg ular s duLiC
meeting will be held in Harris Hal
this evening at seven o'clock.
The Reverend Frederick W. Leech will
be the speaker. All students and thei
friends are cordially invited.
Saint Andrew's Episccpal Church:
Services of worship today are: 8:00
a.m. Holy Communion; 9:30 a.m.
Church School; 11:00 a.m. Kindergar-
ten; 11:00 a.m. Holy Communion
and sermon by the Reverend Henry
Lewis.
Unitarian Church, Today, at 5:30
Mr. Marley will open a series of ser-
mons on "Crimes of the Century"
with a sermon "War on the Bounty
- Investments Tell."
7:30 -Liberal Students Union -
discussion and social hour.
Coming Events
Junior Research Club will meet at
7:30 p.m., Feb. 4, in room 2082 Natural
Science Building. The program is as
follows: "The Convulsive State (epi-
lepsy)," by Dr. R. W. Waggoner of
the Department of Neurology; "Re-
cent Progress in Transmutation of
the Elements," by Dr. H. R. Crane of
the Physics Department.
Women's Research Club, regular
meeting Monday, Feb. 3, Library,
Room 110, 7:30 p.m. Miss Ella M.
Hymans will speak on "Materials for
the History of Medicine."
Michigan Dames: The regular gen-
eral meeting of the Michigan Dames
will be held Tuesday evening, Feb-
ruary 4, at 8:15 at the Michigan
League with the Child Study group
in charge. A short moving picture,
"Around the Clock with your Baby,"
will be presented by Dr.'uRichard
Reekie, and Dr. Lavinia MacKaye,,
pediatrician at the University Ele-
mentary School, will speak on "The
Growth and Development of the pre
and elementary school child."
Michigan Dames Child Study Group
will meet Monday evening, February
3, at eight o'clock at the home of
Mrs. L. Musser, 1033 East Universityj
Avenue.
Dr. Albert Epstein, Executive Sec-
retary of the American Association
for Social Security will speak on "Our
Social Insecurity Act," February . 1,
in Natural Science Auditorium at 8:00
p.m.

VACATION TRAVEL
SPRING or SUMMER
LET TRAVEL EXPERTS HELP
PLAN YOUR TRIP AND MAKE
YOUR RESERVATIONS
Frederitk S. '&andall
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COMMITTE ES
DON'T BE DISAPPOINTED
IN YOUR HOUSE PARTY
PICTURES. MAKE YOUR
APPOINTMENTS NOW BY
CALLING 4514.
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723 North University
"ON THE CAMPUS SINCE 1905"

PRINTING
LOWEST PRICES
PROGRAMS, BIDS, ST .rIONERY
THE ATHENS PRESS
Downtown, North of Postoffice

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Valentine's
Greetings
. .. a box of GILBERT'S
or WHITMAN'S excel-
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ent sizes.

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