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February 01, 1936 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-02-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

GE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1936

Noted Visitors Women's Hours Indeed! How

Plans Summer

Will Teach Atj
Biology Camp
Active Program Of Study
Planned At Douglas Lake
Next Summer Session
The Biological Station will be again
conducted on the shores of Lake
Douglas in Cheboygan County as part
of the 1936 Summer Session, it was
announced in the station's annual
catalogue which was published yester-
day.
The catalogue contains announce-
ments of 31 courses in botany and
zoology, omitting beginning courses,
and the opportunity for graduate stu-
dents to work on their advanced de-
grees. A student, the publication
says, will be allowed to take no more
than eight credit hours.
The University will extend invita-
tions to biological scholars of re-
pute to attend the camp as special in-
vestigators, the catalogue says.
Headed by Professor LaRue, there
will be a teaching staff of 15. Prof.
Alfred H. Stockard of the zoology de-
partment will be secretary of the
station; Dr. William M. Brace of the
Health Service will be camp physi-
cian; and Miss Odina B. Olson of
University High School will act as
dean of women.
Other members of the University
faculty who will be on the station
staff are: Prof. Paul S. Welch of the
zoology department; Prof. John H.
Ehlers of the botany department;
Prof. Carl D. LaRue of the botany
department; Prof. Frank N. Blan-
chard of the zoology department; and
Prof. Frank E. Eggleton of the zool-
ogy department.
Prof. Frank C. Gates of Kansas
State College, Prof. George E. Nich-
ols of Yale University, Prof. Herbert
B. Hungerford of the University of
Kansas, Prof. William W. Cort of
Johns Hopkins University, Prof.
Charles W. Creaser of Wayne Uni-
versity, and Prof. Lyell J. Thomas
of the University of Illinois, will com-
plete the staff.
YEATS REPORTED ILL
LONDON, Jan. 31.-VP)-The
Reuter's (British) news agency cor-
respondent at Palma, Mallorca, re-
ported today that William Butler1
Yeats, Irish poet and Nobel prize1
winner, was seriously ill of a heart1
attack. Yeats is 70 years old.

About The Met

High Fence And
Kept Students
In Early Days

Turnstile
At Home

A high fence and turnstile was used
in the early days of Michigan to pre-
vent students from leaving the camp-
us after 9 p.m., it was recounted yes-
terday in a skit given over the Uni-
versity Broadcasting Service.
The skit, which was written and
presented by members of the Ann
Arbor extension class in broadcasting,
followed an interview of Fred S. Stev-
enson, of the extension division. Mr.
Stevenson spoke about the correspon-
dence courses to be inaugurated next
semester.
Other interesting facts of early
campus life were revealed in this dra-
matic description of the founding of
the University. "There is an en-
trance fee of $10, and then the stu-
dent must pay $4.50 for the use of a
room. A janitor fee for the year must
be met, in addition to the necessity
of buying one's own candles. Books
and board cost about $1.50 a week,"
one of the characters commented.
Monitor On Guard
The strict discipline of the author-
ities in these early days was described
in detail during enfolding of the plot
of the play. Said one character:
"The students are allowed to leave
the campus for their meals but they
have to be on hand for the morning
program by 7:30 a.m. They have
classes from 9 a.m. until 12 noon. In
the afternoon they have classes from
2 p.m. until 5 p.m., and they have to
be on the campus from 7 p.m. until 9
p.m. No student is permitted to leave
the campus after 9 p.m. There is a
high fence and turn-stile, guarded by
a monitor, around the campus.
Describing the first building, which
was 110 feet long and 40 feet high,
the script said, "It is four stories
high, has a chapel and a recitation

n's Curfew At 9? European '[rip
room on the firstand second floors, W ith Bicycles
the library on the third floor, and a
space for a museum on the fourth A summer European tour of six
floor as well as a dormitory. countries, lasting 40 days, has been
Went To Chapel planned by Mr. Werner F. Striedieck
In the dormitory, two students are of the German department, for a
group which will include students
I assigned to a bedroom and a study. land faculty members of the Univer-
They have to clean their own rooms, sity, according to Mr. Striedieck.
cut their own weed at the woodpile While on the continent, the tour-
behind the building. and carry it up ists will travel principally by bicycle,
three flights of stairs. Then they go but also by train. "To see and ex-
to chapel exercises from 5:30 a.m. to plore Europe on bicycle, far from the
6:30 a.m. After that they have their beaten paths, is indeed one of the
first recitation of the day before they most interesting ways to visit coun-
go to breakfast. There are three tries," Mr. Striedieck declared.
classes daily except Saturday when "You may follow the uncongested
they have one class and elocution." roads through fascinating old cities
There were ' four professors ap- and villages," he continued, "and be-
pointed at the founding of the Uni- come familiar with the beauties of
versity, the script revealed: a pro- the Rhineland, the Black Forest, the
fessor of mental philosophy, professor Bavarian and Swiss Alps, and partake
of mathematics, professor of lan- of the hospitality of the people of
guages and professor of law. Their these countries in a way known to few
salary was not to be less than $1200 tourists.
and not more than $2000. The li- The party will leave New York
brarian received $100 a year. June 21 on the Europa, will land at

Southampton, and visit London and G- Br a A alliance between Great Britain and
im d icinty The itinera m, ben AWithE t It was stated that the negotiations
planned to include Rotterdam, the Alliance XXf i thiEgypL will be held in Cairo, starting perhaps
Hague, Cologne and Heidelberg and I_____wilo b. 15 etweenSir les am
the university there.onFb15bewnSiMlsLap
Numereus smaller villages and out- LONDON, Jan. 31. - iP)-The for- son, British high commissioner to
Numeoussmaler illges nd ut-Egypt, and an Egyptian delegation.
of-the-way places will be visited, and eign office announced today that with The Egyptians long have sought
then the group will see Zurich, Mu- the formation of a new Egyptian gov- such a treaty, and it was stated here
nich, Vienna, Prague, and Berlin and ernment headed by Premier Ali Pasha that the British are anxious to get
the Olympic Games, returning to Maher, conversations will be opened started on the work as soon as pos-
the United States on July 23. soon in an effort to frame a treaty of sible.

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$12,278,375 Alloted For
Administration Of Bonus
WASHINGTON, Jan. 31. - 0') -
The Senate Appropriations Commit-
tee approved the Deficiency Appro-
propriation Bill today after adding
$12,278,375 for administrative ex-
penses in connection with paying the
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