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January 26, 1936 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-01-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 1935

THE MICAiGAN DAILY

I

Th"OT
STOVE
---- By BILL REED
A CONTEMPORARY of ours, The
Michigan State News, published
by students at Michigan State Col-
lege, carries a story in Friday's edi-
tion, the argument of which is con-
tained in the following paragraph.
"Therefore, all events considered--
past and present - State is the logi-
cal Michigan institution to play
Notre Dame-and not Michigan
State has clearly displayed super-
iority over the Wolverines the last
two years, defeating them decisively
each fall in their own stadium.
State's football teams have gone on
to win national recognition, while
Michigan has struggled along near
the bottom of the Conference in '34
and '35."
We bow our heads in awe.
* * ,
MINUTES in brief of the Mutual
Admiration Society, University
of Michigan Coaches' Chapter:
Mr. Hoyt: I see you fear Iowa,
Matt. What is it, more bear stuff?
Mr. Mann: There you go. Sitting
on top of the heap and trying to
put everybody else up there while
you climb down.
Mr. Hoyt: What do you mean, top
of the heap? If I was sure of win-
ning as you I might talk.
Mr. Mann: As sure of winning as
me? Why you've got your names
on the medals. I'm ripe.
Mr. Hoyt: Let's drop it.
Meeting adjourned.
Bennie Oosterbaan has developed
a new basketball shot, which we here-
with christen the "hooper-dooper."
Dribbling in from any side, Bennie
takes the ball on the bounce, goes
into the air for a total pivot, brings
the ball around in an arc from the
topc of the bounce, down and then
up, to shoot on the upswing of his
arm.
He hasn't made it yet.
George Rudness, who gives Chelso
Tamagno his greatest playing thrill,
is the only one to try Bennie's new
shot. He hasn't made it either.
Tamagno's biggest thrill is on the
blocking play which gives Rudness
the ball on a break toward the basket
around Tamagno. "Why he goes
past me like he was going to take
my pants off," Chelso says.
Pacific Coast
Football Setup
Is Reorganized
LOS ANGELES, Jan. 25.- (P) -
Western football faces a revolu-
tionized setup in 1936 as a result of
the drastically complete reorganiza-
tion of the Pacific Coast Conference.
That reorganization, involving
creation of what is tantamount to a
"big eight"' playing a round-robin
schedule, came without warning out
of the bitter controversy.
Proponents of the plan assert it:
(1) makes the Conference a real
league for the first time instead of a
loosely-knit federation; (2) assures a
"big-league" schedule for the eight
major members, and (3) makes it
the strongest conference in the Coun-
try, with a resultant improvement in
play and competition.
Opponents call it a "freeze-out"
directed against such non-Confer-
ence teams as St. Mary's, Santa
Clara, University of San Francisco,
Loyola at Los Angeles and Gonzaga

in Washington as well as practically
forcing the perennial tailenders,
Idaho and Montana, out of the Con-
ference.
Box SCOre

Scores 1,000 Points

'Wright Stars
As Grapplers
Beat Spartans
Capt. Wally Heavenrich,
John Speicher And Earl
Thomas Also Win
(Continued from Page 1)
avoid a pin. The frequent "jay
walks" around the ring drew many
laughs from the crowd.
After waiting three years for a
chance to break into the starting
lineup, Wendell Taylor turned in a
good performance in the 135-pound
bout despite the fact that he was
beaten by Jay Davenport. Twice he
squirmed out of pin holds to exhibit
his fine courage. Although a spec-
tator's remark of "Come on Taylor,
sit on that Davenport," failed to
help, it gave the crowd a good laugh.
In the first overtime bout of the
evening, Captain Wally Heavenrich
again joined the victory ranks after
two straight losses by winning the
decision from Perry Conant, veteran
letter winner. Heavenrich was the
aggressor throughout the match
breaking through Conant's advant-
age period to win. Both boys weighed
145-pounds.
Considering the fact that the
match was his first of the season and
that he was suffering from two
bruised ribs, Gross put up a good
fight before bowing to Stonecliff in
the 155-pound battle.
In the 165-pound division, Cap-
tain Jacob beat Bissell in the second
overtime match of the evening. This
close struggle was followed by the
175-pound draw between Lowell and
McDevitt which proved to be an anti-
climax to the deciding heavyweight
tussle.

J -Hoppers
Choose Your Cleaners--
Greene's Because of Their Later,
More Scientific Equipment Are
Prepared to Clean the Most
Delicate of Lace Formals or the
Most Expensive of Full Dress.
Formal Dress

-Associated Press Photo.
William Kinner, University of
Utah searing ace, achieved the goal
of all basketball players by passing
the 1,000-pcint mark in three years
of collegiate competition. With
eight games still remaining on the
Utah schedule Kinner has totaled
1,024 points.

Mrs. Hanley Despondent Over
Pro Status But She Loves job

Your Dinner Suit or Full Dress needs
a refreshing before the J-Hop. Every
Formal Suit receives individual clean-
ing and pressing to satisfy the miost
discriminating.

Woman Who Urged GolfI
For Co-eds Here Now As
Golf Coach
By FRED BUESSER
For eight years Mrs. Stewart Han-
ley, premier woman golfer of the state,
has been instructing Michigan co-eds
in the principles and theory of golf.
For the past three years she has
lived in Ann Arbor and devoted most
of her time to building up a depart-
ment in the instruction of golf. Now,
having built up that department
.until more than two hundred girls
annual receive instruction, and forty
former pupils hold positions as golf
instructors, she has decided to become
a. regular teacher in the physical ed-
ucation school in order to further the
vork she has started on her own in-
.tiative.
Interviewed yesterday, Mrs. Hanley
appeared elated over her new position
as a member of the University fac-
ulty, but regretted that it necessitat-
ed her assuming the status of a pro-
fessional.
Four-Time Champ
A charming woman with a delight-
ful sense of humor, Mrs. Hanley
talked enthusiastically about her work
in connection with the teaching of
golf, but concerning her own startling
record when as a player she was four
times winner of the state and like-
wise the Detroit District Women's
championship, she was inclined to
say little, dismissing her whole com-
petitive career with "-a few tourna-
ments and all that hooey."
Mrs. Hanley is typically the true
sportswoman. Genial, charming, and
a great teacher of golf, she explained
her stand on turning professional.
"I should prefer not to do it," she
said, "but the time has come when
I feel that I can no longer continue
to teach and live in Ann Arbor with-
out some compensation."
"I have turned down professional.
offers for some years now because
I felt that lending my name, earned
as an amateur golfer, to sporting
goods companies, was not in keep-
ing arith the true spirit of amateur
sport.

most entirely to the women in the
school of education who plan to be-
come physical education instructors,
leaving the freshman groups largely
to her assistants.
Her advanced course consists of two
lectures on the theory of golf and one
practical application period per week.
Mrs. Hanley conducts classes in the
fall and in the spring as long as the
weather permits, and it has been her
custom in the past to spend at least a
part of the off season in Florida com-
peting in the winter tourneys.
First Title in '24
Mrs. Hanley won her first state
title in 1924, she discovered after
brushing aside the bittersweet which
filled the beautiful trophy standing
on the other side of the room. Sub-
sequent victories in the same event
followed in 1927 and 1930. In 1934
Mrs. Hanley topped off her competi-
tive career when she captured the
state crown for the fourth time.
But the famous Detroiter's days of
tournament play will be over after
the last of this month, at least as an
amateur. She will still be eligible,
however, for the two women's open
tourneys in this country, the Western
Open played in the summer at Chi-
cago and the Florida Open played
in the south during the winter.
Wcthered Greatest
In her opinion, Joyce Wethered is
the greatest woman golfer in the
world today, but she ranks Mrs. Vare
and Virginia Van Wie the top notch
amateurs. Jean Kyer, Michigan
graduate and an Alpha Phi while in
school is the best woman golfer in
Michigan today, she said.
Mrs. Hanley is the fourth really
outstanding woman to become a pro-
fessional golfer. The others are Enid
Wilson, Helen Hicks and Joyce Weth-
ered.
During the fall semester Mrs. Han-
ley assumes the role of student, and
is particularly interested in economics
and psychology.
Michigan State Relay
Team To Make N.Y. Trip
EAST LANSING, Jan. 25. - (.4)-
After nearly three weeks of practice,
the Michigan State College indoor
track squad has a goal in sight. Coach
Ralph H. Young will begin putting
tests to his half-mile candidates Mon-
day with a trio to New York going
to the four or five runners who make
the best record in trials. A two-mile
relay team will represent the college
in the Millrose A.C. games to be held
in New York next Saturday night.

i

i

Evening Gowns

I

Whether it be lace, net, crepe or chif-
fon it is the wise policy to let Greene's

Michigan (26) FG
E. Townsend, f ... . .0
Meydrs,. f 0 ... .....0
J. Townsend, f .......4
Evans, f . ...........0
Gee, c .....:.........1
Tarnagno, g .........1
Jablonski, g .........0
Rudness, g ...........1
Fishman, g ..........2
Patanelli, g .,.........0
Totals .............9
Miranesota (31) FG
Baker, f .............2
Nasland, f ..........1
Roscoe, f............1
Jones, c ..............3
Manly, c ............1
Rolek, g .............1
Gustafson, ...........0
Seebach, g ...........3
Totals ............12

FT
0
0
3
0
4
0
0
0
0
1
8
SFT
3
0
0
2
0
2
0
0
7

P
2
1
4
0
2
2
2
4
1
1
19
P
4
0
3
0
4
0
0
2
13

TP
0
0
11

Microcleaning
pealing beauty
rmal creation.

service restore the ap-
and luster of every for-

0 Rctains Amateur Spirit
6 "Becoming a member of the Uni-
2 versity faculty, however, carries with
o it a certain dignity that is not to be
2 found elsewhere, and although in a
4 strict sense of the word I shall be-
1 come a professional when I sign my
- contract sometime before February 1,
26 I do so only as a teacher. I would
y not turn pro under any circumstances
TP unless it were a position such as
this where I can retain my amateur
2 spirit, at least, and do golf and am-
2 ateur sport some service by teaching
8 the principles of the game to college
2 girls."
S Mrs. Hanley has developed the de-
0 partment of golf instruction to the
6 point where she devotes herself al-
31

1:

College Cab
7000

.d

0

1

.1

!Ii!

i _

Score at half: Michigan 16, Minne-
sota 12.
Free throws missed: Michigan -
E. Townsend 4, J. Townsend, Rudness,
Fishman. Minnesota - Baker 4, Ros-
coe 2, Janes 2, Rolek, Seebach 5.
Officials: Umpire - John Getthell

The season is now at its best for

GREENE'.S
CLEANERS fr DYERS
I CROCLEAN

Skates

Skis

A L AUAfAl I=

II

I

i

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