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January 18, 1936 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-01-18

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T lE MtI I AN I ATLV

SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1936

SATURDAY, JANIJ'AIIY iS, 1930

Five Are Killed In Buenos Aires Street Car Strike

Hobbs To Talk
(n Explorers
He Has Known
Noted Professor-Emeritus
To Lecture Tomorrow
On Polar Heroes

Classified Directory

6

-Associated Press Photo.
This burned bus was one of 15 ignited during the recent street car strike in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in
which five persons were killed and more than 200 jailed. Five street cars were destroyed by flames.

Need Definition Of Profanity'
To Keep BroadcastingClean

in its script were four "hell's" and
two "damn's." A few days after the
program had been presented, letters
came in to the station from angry
listeners demanding that the Uni-
versity stop "teaching its students to
be profane." Yet, he said, this play
won popular acclaim here on the
campus.
"We have finally came to the place
where we cut the word "hell" out of
the song "Hail, Hail the Gang's All
Here," Professor Abbott said.
The broadcasting of international
program also complicates the prob-
lem of controlling profanity over the
air, Professor Abbott pointed out.
For words which are termed profane
in America may not be profance in
the country where they originate and
thus they may be heard on interna-
tional broadcasts.
"Another danger is that a word
that is perfectly proper may be mis-
understood or mispronounced during
a radio broadcast," Professor Abbott
added.
The instances where a station has
had its license revoked because of the
profanity have been comparatively
few, he said, the most notable case
being that of Mr. W. K. Henderson,
who formerly broadcast from Shreve-
port, La.
The entire difficulty lies in the fact
that there is no exact definition of
profanity, Professor Abbott conclud-
ed. "Consequently we must keep
within the most rigid definition. How-
ever, perhaps the proper definition
is that thohse words are profane
which are deemed so by the radio
audience - their decision is the basis
for any definition," he stated.
lrepare 1%) )escue
3 O Tiny Island
SAULT STE. MARIE, Jan. 17.- (P)
-Coast Guardsmen made prepara-
tions today to remove three fisher-
men from a tiny island off the mouth
of the Tahquamenon River, where,
they were marooned when their tug
became locked by heavy slush.
The men, missing for a week, were
sighted yesterday by Pilot John Flan-
nery, who dropped a package of pro-!
visions as he flew over the island. The
bundle, which broke open as it landed,!
included chocolate, bread, beans, cig-
arets, matches and a bottle of whisky.
The flier said he barely hit the island
with the package although he flew as
low as possible.
Flannery said the marooned men
showed unmistakeable signs of joy
as he tossed the bundle from the
plane. They had a fire and the cabin
of their fishing tug, the George M.,
provided shelter.
Although the coast guardsmen were
doubtful of their chances of reaching
the island, they believed the men
could be picked up.
They explained the freezing wea-
ther was solidifying the ice and while
it would probably prevent them from
pushing their way through it would
enable the men to walk out to clear
water where they could be placed
aboard the boat.

Nye Accusation Is
Scored By Reeves,
(Continued from Page 1)
to the Associated Press, Senator Nye's
committee submitted documentary
evidence showing that the World
War President was "thoroughly ad-!
vised" of the secret treaties for split-I
ting the spoils among the Allied Pow-
ers when he urged Congress to de-
clare war on Germany. Documents
were also introduced at the investi-
gation Wednesday indicating that
shortly after the United States be-
came a belligerent, President Wilson
was fully informed of the contents of
these agreements for remaking the
map of Europe and even brought the
subject up himself in a conversation
with David Balfour of Great Britain.
In the opinion of Professor Slos-
son, "President Wilson must have
known of the existence of the treat-
ies at the time, but may have meant
that he had no official knowledge of
them-that, in the language of the
courts, he did not have judicial cog-
nizance of the treaties." Professor
Reeves concurred in this view.
The history professor said he was
"greatly surprised" at the time that
President Wilson made his state-
ment, but he held, nevertheless, that
Senator Nye's use of the word "falsi-
fied" was "too harsh."
He pointed out that President Wil-
son's attitudeall the way through the
war and peace conferences was that
because the United States had no
official knowledge of the treaties, he
did not have to consider himself
bound by them. , As a specific in-
stance, he called attention to Wil-
son's disclaiming the Anglo-French
treatry regarding Italian claims. Wil-
son though this would be an ad-
vantage, rather than a disadvantage,
to the United States, Professor Slos-
son said.
Professor Reeves explained that
these treaties were printed and dis-
cussed in the Nation magazine at
the time they were revealed in 1919.
Reiterating his stand regairding
Senator Nye, North Dakota Repub-
lican, Professor Reeves asserted that
"so far as Senator Bennett Champ
Clark (Missouri Democrat, a member
of the munitions committee) is con-
cerned, we well remember that Wil-
son defeated his father, Champ Clark,
for the Democratic Presidential nom-
ination."
Senator Clark, speaking of cor-I

When Professor-emeritus William
H. Hobbs of the geology department
lectures on contemporary polar ex-
plorers at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow in
Room 316 in the Union, he will be
speaking about men he has known
intimately, and in some cases, whom
he has known for a long time.
The subject of the talk to be given
by Professor Hobbs will be "Polar
Explorers I Have Known," and it was
announced that the lecture would be
illustrated with lantern slides.
Besides writing biographies of many
of the polar explorers, Professor
Hobbs has conducted two University
expeditions to Greenland, in 1926-27
and 1932-33. At the present time he
is writing a biography of Admiral
Robert E. Peary, discoverer of the
North Pole.
Professor Hobbs is recognized as an
international authority on glaciers
and other geological phenomena. His
special field of study has been earth-
quakes. After the close of the World
war he served on a committee set up
by the Allies to determine the new
boundaries of Poland, Hungary, Ger-
many, and the other nations affected
by the changes in the Versailles
Treaty.
Union officials stated that it was
planned to continue the series of
Sunday lectures for several months.
The series was inaugurated last month
when Prof. John S. Worley of the
transportation engineering depart-
ment spoke on recent research to im-
prove the traffic systems in the large
cities.
Ask Change In j
Indeterminate
Sentence Law
State Crime Commission
Suggests Minimum Term
Be Increased In Statute
LANSING, Jan. 17. -(/P) - A re-
search committee of the state crime'
commission suggested today that a
minimum term be written into the
state's indeterminate sentence law.
Representative George C. Watson,
of Capac, and Harry G. Gault, Flint
attorney, making a study of the law's
operation, submitted the suggestion
to the commission at its meeting yes-
terday.
Gault explained that the minimum
might be six months, the shortest
term to which a felon can be sen-
tenced to serve in a state prison.
The sentencing judge would name a
maximum term and recommend
whatever minimum term he desired.
The parole commissioner would have
the right to free the prisoner after
rehabilitation and before the recom-
mended sentence expired.
respondence between Wilson and
Colonel House, which said that the
President expected America to have
the Allies financially at its mercy and
to use this condition as a club, told
the committee: "The President was
never able to use this financial club,
however, and the Allies did as they
pleased."

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for two or more insertions. Minimum
three lines per insertion.
10% discount If paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
By contract, per line-2 lines daily.
one month ......................8c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months ........8c
2 lines daily, college year......7c
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100 lines used as desired. 3c
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The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reating lines per inch.
Tonic type, upper and lower case. Add
3c per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case.eAdd
1Oc per line to above rates for bold face
eapital letters.
The above rates are for 7% point
type.
WANTED
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY. Any
old and new suits, overcoats at $3
to $20. Don't sell before you see
Sam. Phone for appointments.
2-3640. lox
'Sprit Of '76'
Discussed In
Air Program
"The Spirit of '76" was discussed
Thursday by Miss Adelaide Adams,
instructor in fine arts, and Marie
Abbot, Grad., in a continuation of
the arts series over the University
Broadcasting Service.
Describing first the life of Archi-
bald M. Willard, the painter of the
picture, Miss Adams told of his being
hired in the shop of a wheelwright
and wagon-maker where he painted
wagons after his service in the Civil
War was ended.
Earning extra money through
paintings, Willard was enabled to
take an art course, later setting up
a studio in Cleveland, Miss Adams
said. Here he began painting a pic-
ture called "Yankee Doodle" she ex-
plained, but later because of the con-
fusion of the name with a Boston

LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox {
Careful work at low price.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Phi Eta Sigma key.
call D. N. Sweeney. 4917.

LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. ..6x

204
LOST: Five keys in pigskin "Key-
Light" case. Most important. Call
8632. 191
LOST: Theta Phi Alpha sorority pin.
Reward. F. Schrauder. Call 4018.
197
FOR SALE
FANCY APPLES: Spies, Greenings,
Wagners. Sweet filtered cider. Will
deliver. Phone 3926. 1003 Brooks.
192
FOR RENT - ROOMS
FOR RENT: Double and single rooms
for boys; board if desired. 727 East
University. Phone 7472. 193
DOUBLE and single rooms for girls.
Board if desired. Call 4018. 202
TODAY'S FEATURE: Hot chile sup-
per. Mrs. Hampton's Tea Room.
25c. 5 to 7 p.m. 605 Forest. 201
ROOMS for girls, both double. Mrs.
Andrus, 909 E. University. Phone
2-1136. 203
NOTICES
DRESSMAKING: Formals for J-Hop
time. 1208 S. University. Phone
2-2020. 12x
MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
half-wit known by the same name,
it was changed to "The Spirit of
'76."
The picture shows three musicians
marching toward the battlefield, with
soldiers following, shouting and toss-
ing their hats in the air. It is. dom-
inated by the three musicians; how-
ever, Miss Adams pointed out. The
elderly drummer is a tall, straight,
powerful figure, the fifer, a sturdy
man of middle age with a fringe of
whiskers about his humorous face,
and the third }figure, a boy, has his
face upturned to the old man with
a look of rapt inspiration, Miss Adams
commented.

darned.
Ix
Please

"
Ills r-

---

- --ill

PLAY PRODUCTION
and the SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Together with the Department of Physical Education
UNIVERSITY of MICHIGAN
present
The GILBERT & SULLIVAN COMIC OPERA
or "THE WITCH'S CURSE"
Last Times Today
Matinee at 2:30 Today
Lydia MENDE LSSOHN Theatre
For Reservations, Call 6300
PRICES: MATINEE: 75c, 50c, 35c EVENING: $1.00, 75c, 50c

I

Ii_'-

I . -- EF:E

____j

i

JI

MAT. 25c
Shows at
2:00 & 3:30

I

G, MAIFJT)C
Ica

BALC. EVE.
25c
M.F. Eve. 35c

NOW SHOWING!
FIRST BIG HIT
OF 19 36!

ONE BIG WEEK
i~

Reach 10,000 People

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i

1

DAILY 15c to 6 - 25c after 6
CONTINUOUS 1:30 - 11 P.M.
Ends Tonight -
PETER B. KYNE'S
"GALLANT DEFENDER"
and
WARREN WILLIAM
"Don't Bet On Blondes"
TOMORROW
TWO NEW FEATURES
ROGER PRYOR
JOAN PERRY
"CASE OF THE
MISSING MAN"

for as little as
Cheap? Figure it out for your-
self. Effective? The people
who use the want ads regular-
ly know that it is! Easy? Just
a matter of picking up a tele-
phone and calling our ad-
taker! What more could you
want . . . whether it's rooms
to rent, articles to sell, or lost
S1 J f i 1 -

3Cc.
(NYinimum charge
for a three-line ad
inserted one time.
Additional inser-
tions only a little
more.)

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N , W U rWUN w UI 13Miw MIII

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