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January 16, 1936 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-01-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THEA^ JANUARY6,

11

Mrs. Sehall To Run

Features Of France Described

DAILY OFFICIAL
IBiJLIITI

Inuw, its puptlituce, its art and its
science, were described by Prof. Mich-
ael S. Pargment of the French de-
partment, in a speech yesterday over
the University Broadcasting Service.
"The race elements which have
gone into the making of the French
nation are quite as numerous as those
that have contributed to the forma-
tion of the American nation," Profes-
sor Pargment stated. The Gauls, the
Romans and the Franks are, however,
the main races- which have combined
"in the melting-pot of Europe," he
said, and the unity of the French na-
tion thus resides not in the race, but
in the nation itself.
The climate of France, Professor
Pargment continued, is characterized
by its great variety. In a short time
one can go from a cold winter cli-
mate to one of a hot summer and
through all the others, he explained.
Speaking of Paris, Professor Parg-
ment declared, "it is much more than
gay; it is, without a doubt, the most
industrious, patient and disciplined
city of the world. It is the heart
and mind of its country. Also it is the
intellectual and artistic Mecca of the
world.
"The population of France," the
speaker continued, "is increasing due
to the readiness with which France
receives into its midst the different
races and people from other nations."
France assimilates foreigners more
rapidlyand more completely than
any other nation. A French na-
turalized citizen is, as a general rule,
a Frenchman heart and soul."
The race problem, moreover, Pro-
fessor Pargment pointed out, plays
a very insignificant role in France.
"The Frenchman possesses neither
racial instinct nor racial conscience.
He does not understand the attitude
of the Anglo-Saxons towards the col-
ored races. He judges men only
according to the civilization to which
they are attached."
r - - - - -7 - 7 7

"Democracy," the spvaker deckared,
"is probably a greater reality in
France than in any other European
country." This, he explained, is be-
cause no job is political, "all power
being almost at all times in the hands
of the electors." Moreover, FranceE
"is a country of great freedom," he
added.
"France is one of the mightiest cul-
tural forces in the world," Professor

Pargment stated.

This eminence is

-Associated Press Photo.
Mrs. Thomas D. Schall, widowof
the late blind senator from Min-
nesota, announced at her home in
Berwyn, Md., she had decided to
run for the senate on the Republi-
can ticket.
Club Is Addressed
By Prof. Meinecke
Prof. Bruno Meinecke of the Latin
department went to Detroit yester-
day to deliver a lecture before the
"Classical Teachers" Club of Detroit
on "Music Among the Greeks and
Romans."
Professor Meinecke discussed the
ancient theory of music. and demon-
strated the various genera and scales
on his violin, and played his own
arrangement of two important frag-
ments of Greek music. His first se-
lection was "The First Pythian Ode
of Pindar," and the second "Hymn to
Demeter."
He also showed slides representing
the ancient sources as found in ob-
jects of art, in literateur and daily
life.

due to the humanism of French phi-
losophy, the universality and logical-
ity of its thought, and the clarity of
the language, he added.
I)1% C i-mmer Is
Sitbject Of Book
Dr. Leroy Crummer, whose gift of
important books illustrating the his-
tory of medicine has been one of the
notable benefactions of the last few
years to the University Library, is
the subject of a recent book, "A Doc-
tor's Odyssey," by A. Gaylord Bea-
man of Los Angeles.
The volume is illustrated with pho-
tographs of some of Dr. Crummer's
books as shown in the exhibit cases
of the General Library.
Dr. Crummer has spent a varied
and successful life as a physician,
teacher, book collector and author.
Of his important contributions Dr.
William W. Bishop, University li-
brarian, commented, "The import-
ance of the Crummer Collection to
students of the history of medicine
at this University cannot be over-
emphasized."
KRAUS IN NEW YORK
Dean Edward H. Kraus of the lit-
erary college left last night for New
York to attend the meeting of the
American Association of Colleges. He
will return to Ann Arbor Saturday.

( Col(A11e'd Itfl'OMPaige, 4)
(lay, Jan. 17, 4:15 p.m., in the League.
The program will consist of a collo-
quium on T. S. Eliot's philosophic
position as a critic. Mr. Giovanni
and Mr. La Driere will lead the dis-
cussion. The public is cordially in-
vited.
Cerele Francais: The Ensian pic-
ture will be taken Friday at 12:00
noon. All members please report at
Dey's Studio at that time and bring
a quarter to cover the picture.
'Ensian business staff try-outs will
please meet at Rentschler's Studio at
4:30 Friday afternoon for the staff
picture.
Graduate Outing Club will meet at
Lane Hall at 2:30, Saturday. Trans-
portation will be provided to the Scio
Scout Cabin for Skiing and Tobogan-
ing or Hiking and Games depending
on the weather. Supper will be served
for approximately 35 cents. All grad-
uate students are cordially invited
to attend.
Niebuhr Luncheon: A faculty-min-
isterial luncheon will be held in hon-
or of Professor Reinhold Niebuhr of
Union Theological Seminary at 12:15
on Tuesday, Jan. 21, in the Union.
Prof. Niebuhr will speak on, "Chris-
tian and other philosophies of his-
tory." Members of the faculty whc
wish to attend should make their
reservations by telephoning the Lane
Hall office (8969) before Saturday
noon.
RURAL SNOW REMOVAL
LANSING, Jan. 15. - OP) - Gov.

r
i
f
r
v

Kolisch and Felix Khuner, violins;
Eugen Lehner, viola; Benar Heifetz,
cello.
They made their American debut
at the Library of Congress Festival
of Chamber Music held in April last
year at Washington, and their pro-
THE
ORATORICAL ASSN.
presents
DOROTHY
THOMPSON
(Mrs. Sinclair Lewis)
Speaking on
"REDISCOVERING
AMERICAr

SAVINGS SHOW GAIN
BATTLE CREEK, Jan. 15. - (P) -
Savings deposits in two Battle Creek
banks show an increase of $2,393,305
during 1935.

Kolisch Quartet Is One Of Few
When inenibers of the Kolisch grain was praised by Olin Itwies,
string quartet comes here Monday music critic of the New York Times
for their first appearance in Ann as the outstanding event of the fes-
Arbor on the Choral Union Concert tival.
; series, concertgoers will have an op- Rudolph Kolisch, the founder is
portunity of hearing one of the few worried for fear people will think this
string ensembles in the world which memory playing is simply a stunt,
play their programs entirely from'because, he says, the reason is that
memory. they feel their playing is more spon-
Because of this amazing fact, the taneous if they dispense with scores.
Kolisch group won from Dr. Paul In the beginning the members of
Stefan, eminent Viennese critic, the the quartet performed only a few
title of "The Toscanini of all the compositions from memory, but grad-
quartets in the world." ually they increased the number un-
The quartet is a young organiza- til finally they became so accustomed
tion which has not yet attained its to playing without scores that it
tenth year. It is composed of four would be difficult for them to do so
young musicians of Vienna, Rudolph now.

Fitzgerald sought today to extend
to persons whose property borders on
country roads some of the benefits
of highway snow removal that now
are granted only to more traveled
highways.

HILL AUDITORIUM
Thursday, January 23
8:15 p.m.
Tickets at WAHR'S
Prices 75c and 50c

IL

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I

I

Campus Cut- Rate Drug
218 So. State St. (Goldman Bldg.) Phone 9392 (We Deliver)
WEEK-END SPECIALS
Ann Arbor's Busiest Little Drug Store

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Chesterfields,
Raleighs, Old Golds
$1.10 Carton
Plus Tax
2 for 25c
A RED HOT SPECIAL !
TEKAMINE
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6 for 49c
STATIONERY
SPECIAL
100 Sheets 50 Envelopes
Pure Vellum Paper
49c

$5.00
SPARKLETS
with Cartridges
All for $3.98
$1. REM
79c
50c Squibbs, Ipana,
or Iodent
Tooth Paste
34c
F-R-E-E
25c
Paring Knife
with 'every purchase
of Phillips' Tooth
Paste
Both,25c

I

$1.25
Briggs Tobacco
$1.10

-Ix

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Washable Cotton Frocks
EVERY DRESS produced by the leading manufacturers in America - You
are therefore assured of Finest Quality Workmanship, Fabrics and the
newest styles.

11

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SIZES 14-

20 and 38- 54

1

with / SMOC
.A A A L 1 D U ' .. U * ER * -._31

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