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October 01, 1935 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1,1935

Tournament Opens Season's

Intramural Program

Intramural Building
Hours 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
The Intramural Building will be
open daily (except Sunday) from
8 a.mn. to 6:15 p.m. Activities
must cease at 5:45. The swimming
pool will be open from 3 to 5 in
the afternoon. Sometime after
he first of November the building
will be open in the evenings.

I-M Prepares
For 34 Sports,
SpecialEvents
Program Of Instruction
May Be Enlarged With
FERA Assistance

Coach McMillin's 'Five-Man'
Backfield Not All Name Implies

i

The Hot StoveI

t
S

Boilermaker Coach
Still Undecided As
To Starting Lineup
LAFAYETTE, Ind. Sept., 30--Head- '
ing into the final flurry of drill in
preparation for the crucial season's
opener with Northwestern at Evans-
ton on October 5, Purdue's coaching
staff is even more perplexed than
ever when it comes to naming a
definite starting lineup for the Wild-
cat encounter.
Faced with the problem of devising
a defense capable of halting the pow-
erful running attack that the Wild-
cats are expected to launch in view
of their beefy line, touted as the Big
Ten's heaviest, and at the same time
developing an end-running and aerial
offense in which speed will be the
main factor in an effort to elude that
samecheavy, forward wall, thePur-
due coaches have been placed in
somewhat of a dilemma, particularly
in view of the wide-open fights for
practically every position on the
team.
Frequent Shifts In Line
In an effort to find the most effec-
tive combination, trequent shifts have
been made in both forward wall and
backfield combinations during game
scrimmages, but few candidates have
been able to gain an appreciable edge
in the battle for permanent assign-
ments, and it would take a lot of
temerity to attempt to name a start-
ing lineup at the present time.
Most of the indecision centers
about the halfback, tackle, and end
posts. At left tackle, Forrest Burmeis-
ter, fast-moving 213 pound perform-
er, will probably get the call, but to
date nothing that looks like a per-
manent right tackle has been un-
covered.
Dennis At Guard
George Dinnis, who was moved out
from guard for a time, has been
shifted back to his normal position,
and the coaches may be forced to
fall back on Ted Fehring, who was
handicapped by bad knees last sea-
son, or a sophomore contingent head-
ed by Clem Woltman.
At the wings, Frank Loebs seems
due for th eregular spurs at right end,
but it may take a coin toss to decide
between Howard Guirl, Colby Reed,
and sophomore aspirants for the oth-
er outpost.
GET LIFE PASS
Four Cardinals - Frank Frisch,
Bob O'Farrell, Jess Haines and Mike
Gonzales - have been awarded life-
time passes by the National League
for their long and meritorious serv-
ice.

Presenting a diversified athletic
calendar for all men students and
faculty members on campus, the In-
tramural Building starts the school
year with the opening of its fall sports
program.
During the course of the year, 34
sports are carried on in five divisions
-fraternity, independent, all-cam-
pus, faculty, and cosmopolitan. Spe-
cial events are scheduled from time
to time such as the Tilden tennis
matches, high school basketball
tournaments and swimming meets,
officials meetings, A.A.U. handball
and codeball tournaments, Y.M.C.A.
volley ball tournaments, and the an-
nual J-Hop.
At present the building is not open
in the evening, so the greatest num-
ber of activities are usually being
run off between 3 and 6 in the after-
noon. After the first of November
the building will be open until 9:30
p.m.
Tennis players generally have the
preference of the indoor courts up
until three after which basketball
players, providing there are five or
more, may take over the gymnasium
floor.
One of the features being offered
is the instructional program in which
some fifteen sports are studied. Due
to the FERA help this year, it is like-
ly that this part of the program can
be enlarged upon so that practically
individual instruction can be given.
Extension classes are carried on
each Tuesday evening and occasional
Saturday evening mixed groups such
as the outing club and badminton club
engage in squash, tnnis, badminton,
and swimming.
Swimming Meet Finals
Scheduled For Thursday
After three days of eliminating in
the Orientation Week swimming
meet, the field has been brought
down to a workable size and the
champions in the five events are
scheduled to be decided Thursday
afternoon at 5:00.
In the 50-yard free style race eight
men will be entered. They are La-
Salle, Tauykn, Tomski, Holmes, Hoyt,
Kirer, Lautman, and Lawrence.
Holmes, Tomski, Sattler, Pasche,
Reeford, and Trendle will compete
for the 100-yard free style title.
Elimination races has left six in
the 50-yard breast stroke, namely:
Clark, Kent, Hird, Bohn, Vincent,
and Foryth. Blake and Kent will
have the 50-yard back stroke event
to themselves.
Newhouse, Ash, LaSalle, Bohn, J.
Barnard, and Ruff will compete foi
the diving title.
Those men in the finals were win-
ners of either first or second places in
the elimination competition.

By RAYMOND GOODMAN
When the Michigan eleven meets1
Indiana a week from this Saturday,
Wolverine fans will be given their
first oportunity to see Coach A. N.
(Bo) McMillin's highly rated "five-
man" backfield in action.
Hoosier fans, who witnessed all of
Indiana's games last season, en-
countered much difficulty trying to
figure out just what McMillin's sys-
tem is. In most cases this perplexed
state of mind was caused by the
name which while it proved good pub-
licity at both Kansas State College
and Indiana, does not describe the
McMillin system in its true form.
Shifts Into Line
Most spectators expected to see
five men, all of whom were behind
the line of scrimmage at the time
the ball was snapped, in the place
of the conventional backfield of four.
This was only natural for the name
implied that this would be the case.
However, when the game got under
way the fans found that they had
been hoaxed for this was not what
they saw at all. Instead they saw
five men, the four backs and one of
the linemen, probably the right
guard, line up behind the line of
scrimmage; the quarter calling the
shift, and the fifth man going back
into the line. From that point on
the play functioned in the same gen-
eral manner as that of the average
team.
Varies Position
The disturbing factor in the "five-
man" backfield is that the opposing
eleven can never be sure into just
what juncture of the line the fifth
man will shift. In time he may go
into the left side and make an un-
balanced line. The next play may
find him at his regular position on
the right side, should he be the right
guard, and the Hoosiers with the
ordinary type of forward wall.
McMillin uses other linemen oc-
casionally, besides the right guard to
play the fifth man and may even al-
low one of the backfield men to shift

into the line at times. This varia-
tion, however, is rare. .
Must Keep Alive
Because the opposing team can1
never be sure just where to find the'
"fifth man" it is necessary for every
man to stay on his toes always ready
for any quick change. Last year the
system met with fair success until the
final game against Purdue. It was in
the Boilermaker tilt that the Hoosiers
actually clicked, stealing a tie for the
Big Ten title from the surprised
Purdue team.
This season :s sure to find the
"five-man" system a really dangerous
weapon for Coach McMillin now has
a squad which will know how to use
his plays as well as a veteran, Bob
Keck, to fill the position of fifth back.
In addition to these assets the
Hoosiers will boast a real offensive
threat. It was the lack of offensive
power that caused McMillin most
worry last season, however, with the
return of Vernon Huffman, 190 pound
quaterback, to the lineup as well as
a generous supply of veteran backs,
this problem has been solved.

(Continued from Page 15)t
care of his finances and generally
exerting a stabilizing influence, the
chances of Louis losing himself on
the traditional road of broken pugs
are less.
The second influence is Louis' own
apparent sincerity. The Bible-read-
ing of Louis, however it has been ex-
ploited, is no myth, and along with
it is an honest desire for learning
which was denied the boy who found
himself on the road to a million dol-
lars after quitting a five dollars-a-day
job in an automobile body plant. And
that desire is characterized by an-
other connection with Michigan, in
the person of Willis Ward, one of the
greatest of all Michigan athletes. His
friendship is prized by Louis, and at
least partly because of the intellectual
and moral balance which Ward
showed in a college career which did
not lack its rough going.
In the person of John Roxborough
and Willis Ward, then, are character-
ized two of the influences which every
fight follower who has been forced
to accede to the power of Louis' ring
personality hopes may be permanent.

A LOT OF WEIGHT
EVANSTON, Ill., Sept. 30.-Place
the 10 tackle candidates on North-
western University's football team on
one scale and the combined weight
will exceed one ton. Their total
weight is 2,061 pounds, an average
of 206 pounds per man. The heav-
iest is Park Wray, 238 pounds, and
the lightest is Vance Burnett, 195
pounds.
State Street
Barber Shop
for
SATISFACTION
SERVICE
SANITATION
Proprietors:
"Steve" Hiuser Wm. A. Miller
225 South State Street
Opposite Kroger's

I

r

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An Entire Building given over to your pastime and pleasure.
12 Beautiful BOWLING ALLEYS, and PING-PONG and
BILLIARD TABLES set in an atmosphere inducive to Real
Enjoyment.
BOWL FOR HEALTH
Bowling - Evenings, also Saturday & Sunday, 20c -- Afternoons, 3 for 50c
ANN ARBOR RECREATION HALL
605-7 East Huron Formerly "GRANGER'S" Phone 9306

I

.
------

POPULAR IN ENGLAND
Soccer football, in Great Britain,
is no longer a dead end for youthful
aspirants. It has become such a high-
ly specialized pastime demanding ex-
pert knowledge that there is ample
scope for the old player in man-
agerial positions. Salaries of $5,000 a
year are common. The dearth of
players is the biggest problem in the
game.

University of Michigan Oratorical Assn.

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Next to the Wuerth Theatre
DOWNTOWN
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Don't fail to see
our exclusive
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Hill Auditorium

1935-1936

Ann Arbor

EF

EIGHT OUTSTANDING FEATURES:

EMIL LUDWIG
Noted Biographer
Author of "Napoleon,"
"Bismarck" and other
Books
HON.
WILLIAM R. CASTLE
Distinguished American
Diplomat
HON.
HARRY L. HOPKINS
Head of The Works
Progress Administration
REV.
BERNARD R. HUBBARD,
S. J.

REAR ADMIRAL
RICHARD E. BYRD
Famous Aviator Explorer
DOROTHY THOMPSON
Outstanding Woman
Journalist
JOSEF ISREALS
Brilliant Commentator
On Ethiopia
EDWARD PRICE BELL

Foreign Newspaper
Correspondent

'The "Glacier Priest"

Rear-Admiral
RICHARD E. BYRD

SPECIAL SEASON TICKET PRICES
Three Central Sections of the Main Floor ............................ $3.50

Extreme Right and Left Sections of the Main Floor...

$3.00

Three Central Sections of the First Balcony ............................ $3.00

Extreme Right and Left Sections of the First Balcony

............ $2.75

ALL SEATS RESERVED

Single Admissions: Main Floor, 75c, 50c, except for the Byrd lecture when the prices
will be: Main Floor, $1.00; Balconies, 75c.

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