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December 18, 1935 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-12-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1935

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

- - - _ _ _ __ _ . _ . _ 4 .

PAGE THREE

Baldwin To Try
For Confidence
Vote Tomorroii
Foreign Affairs Debate
In House Of Commons
Will Afford Issue
LONDON, Dec. 17.- (R') -Prime
Minister Stanley Baldwin, rallying
his nearly demoralized ranks after
a harrowing scourge of angry criti-
cism of the Anglo-French peace plan,
prepared to fight to demand a vote
of confidence in Thursday's foreigr
affairs debate in the House of Com-
mons.
With the first panic overcome,
Baldwin took charge of restoring the
government order in a manner which
left diplomatic quarters in doubt as
to the final outcome.
On the surface, victory was assured
Baldwin because of his topheavy con-
servative majority. Observers be-
lieved, however, that the deep-lying
bitterness and distrust caused by the
sudden peace maneuver will remain
to embarrass the government in the
future.
Labor's action in deciding to ask
.a vote of censure Thursday gave
Baldwin the opportunity he is await-
ing. He will seize the opportunity
by backing up the demand for a vote
of confidence with what is expected
to be one of the most important
speeches of his career.
Sir Samuel Hoare, foreign secre-
tary, will open debate for the govern-
ment and Baldwin will close it.
The cabinet met today in Sir Sam-
uel's drawing room to map its plans.
Anthony Eden, minister for League
affairs, departed for Geneva with in-
structions not to demand that the
League council accept the peace
scheme.'
Juvenile Soprano
Will Sing Tonight
Master Dewi Jones, remarkable 13-
year-old Welsh boy soprano, will ap-
pear at 8 p.m. tonight at St. Andrew's
Episcopal Church here to give a con-
cert in the course of an American
tour.
Dewi Jones, noted as a child prod-
igy, made his first public appearance
at the age of three, and has gained
a wide reputation as a church soloist.
He appeared here last year with the
Chrysler Choir in a concert in Hill
Auditorium.
In his concert tonight he will be
accompanied by the St. Andrew's
choir, which will give .two numbers.
There is a small admission charge.

One Source

Of Fresh Meat For Italians

In Ethiopia

Detroit Charter
Commended By
Prof. Bromage
(Continued from Page 1)
ever to be governed by the manager
plan is Cleveland, he pointed out,
which, after adopting it in 1924, along
with the Hare system of proportional
representation, abandoned it in 1931.1
Professor Bromage assigned the rea-
son for this to the fact that the plan
did not work out well mechanically
- the manager kept going ove'r into
the policy-forming field - and that
the people of Cleveland apparently
did not like proportional representa-
tion. Then the depression came
along, he added, and the plan was
"kicked out the window."
He mentioned a recent referendum
on the manager plan in. Cuyahoga
county, of which Cleveland is the
most important part, in which the
manager plan was again popularly
favored as being a possible "swing-
back."
An adequate comparison of the
government of Detroit, with nearly
2,000.000 persons, and the govern-
ment of Cincinnati, with only 450,000
persons, is not possible Professor
Bromage held. It is really a com-
parison between the two systems of
government - the mayor and council
type and the manager form - he said.

Ethiopian In U.S.

County Government
Will Be Discussed
County government will be the sub-
ject of an open forum discussion at
the meeting of the Ann Arbor Cit-
izens' Council at 8 p.m. today at the
City Hall. Lewis Re:mann and other
Cc._cil members will present the his-
tori ca l and financial backgrounds of
this form of government, as well as
criticisms of its efficiency.
The Council will alro hear the re-
port of a committee appointed to in-
terview the candidates for the Wash-
Lanaw county auditorship.
GREYHOUND LINES
Chicago $.
ROUND TRIP FARES
SPECIAL THRU BUSSES I
Only Authorized
Campus Agents
Hours: 12:30 - 7:30
UNION PARROT
Tel. 4151 Tel. 4636

-Associated Press Photo.
This little piggy is going to market, but not in the usual sense. Interested in having some fresh meat
on hand when wanted, Italian soldiers brought him along, permitting him to ride in comfort on a tank during
an advance along the northern Ethiopian front.

-Associated Press Photo
Lij Tasfaye Zaphiro (above),
first secretary of the Ethiopian
legation in London, is shown as he
arrived in New York, nattily
dressed, to raise Christmas funds
for his countrymen.

F-

Mop And Dishrag
Wielders To Have
Training In Work
Hail the girls who wield the mop
and dishrag! With the announce-
ment of a $40,000 allotment by the
National Youth Administration for
the establishment of 'practice houses'
in Ann Arbor and four other Mich-
igan cities, Miss Catherine Murray,
state director of women's projects for
WPA, stated that arrangements were
already under way to establish a
school of household service here.
The practice house idea was orig-
inally started under the FERA work
relief program and has become na-
tion-wide in scope, Michigan having
five such houses in operation at the
present time, it was stated. There
have been 145 graduates from these
Michigan schools to date, Miss Mur-
ray said, and practically all have ob-
tained good positions in homes, with
wages averaging $6 a week. The ed-
ucational advantages these girls have
over the home-trained neophytes
would seem, by these statistics, to give
the graduates a two to three dollar
advantage in earning their suste-
nance.
The course is designed primarily for
girls from relief families.

'.

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CHRISTMAS GIFTS ~
of Distinction
Combination Cigarette Case and Lighters
$2.50 - $3.50 - $5.00 - $6.00 - $7.50
Three-Piece Dresser Sets
$3.95 - $5.00 - $7.50 - $10.00 - $15.00a
"Little Shaver" Razors ... $1.00 - $1.95
Compacts - Cloisonne $1.00 - $1.95 - $2.95
For those who wish to fill in patterns for Christmas-
we have a comprehensive stock of Sterling Silver Flatware.
2oM
208 So, Main

I. 1

Save
During
Vacation..
GREENE'S realize that it is very inconvenient for you to
come home after vacation and find the wardrobe that you
took home with you is all mussed and needing cleaning; also
because of your fear of fire, or theft, while you are gone,
you have not left any of your clothes in Ann Arbor.
GREENE'S suggests that you leave some of your garments
with them, fully insured against FIRE and THEFT, to be
cleaned and pressed during the vacation, and delivered to
you immediately upon your return to Ann Arbor.

s
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