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December 15, 1935 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-12-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

L EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

sUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1935

Accident Near
Adrian Takes
Lives Of Four,
Washtenaw County Men In
Crash With Truck On
Highway U.S. 112
An automobile accident near Ad-
rian cost the lives of four Washtenaw
County men and severely injured two
others at 7 a.m. yesterday morning
when a truck operated by the Detroit
Motor Freight Co. collided on U.S.-
112, near Cambridge Junction, with a
1935 Chevrolet sedan occupied by six
recidents of Milan and Saline.
The dead are:
Bernard Siefker, 25 years old, Route
2, Milan, driver of the passenger car,
who died yesterday afternoon in a
Jackson hospital.
Frederick Seeger, 25 years old,
Route 1, Saline, killed instantly;
Luther Graf, 24 years old, Route 1,
Saline, killed instantly;
Lawrence Rump of Milan, 28 years
old, killed instantly.
Injured in the crash were Joseph
Siefker, 32 years old, of Milan,
brother of the driver, who suffered a
skull fracture and compound frac-
ture ofsthe knee; John Foss, about
30 years old, of Milan, who suffered
a fratcured leg and shock, with pos-
sibly back injuries; and Leo King,
'35 years old, and John Stanley, 38
years old, both of Detroit, who suf-
fered multiple contusions and lac-
erations about the face and head.
Siefker and Foss were taken to the
Bixby Hospital in Adrian, while King,
driver of the truck, and Stanley, his
assistant, were held without charges
by state police in the Lenawee County
Jail at Adrian.
According to the report of the Clin-
ton branch of the state police, the
Chevroletwas proceeding west on
U.S.-112, three miles west of Cam-
bridge Junction, when it was struck
by King's eastbound truck and hurled
100 feet by the impact. The two ve-
hicles came to rest in the ditch on
the north side of the road. Accord-
ing to the report, the lighter car was
demolished and the cab of the truck,
a Ford V-8 tractor type with a load
of about 10 tons, was telescoped by
the force of the collision.
"It appears that the truck was on
the wrong side of the road," an of-
ficer of the Clinton station comment-
ed last night.
Paul E. M'ott, Lenawee County cor-
oner, late last night, had not set any
date for an inquest, and no definite
charges had been made against the
Detroit men.
Bernard and Joseph Siefker lived
on a farm near Milan with their
widowed mother, and Seger and Graf
were neighbors near Saline. The men
were first identified by hunting and
driving licenses found in their pock-
ets.

1,500-Ton U.S.S. Cummings Christened

Sample Issues Best Foresty
Injunction In Article To Get
Train Dispute Award Of $50

Speech Convention nounced by the secretary, Prof. Gail
E.Densmore.
To Be Held Dec. 30 Representatives of almost 100
schools, colleges and universities
The 20th annual convention of the hroughout the country will attend
ationa nnusociaionofeachern ofhthe convention, which is held in con-
National Association of Teachers of junction with the American Speech
Speech will be held from Dec. 30 Correction Association and The Na-
through Jan. 1 in Chicago, was an- tional Theatre Conference.

Order Forbids

Railroad

To Discontinue Morning
Commuters Service
An injunction restraining the

tIncome Taken From Pack'
Foundation Prize; Open
To Undergraduates
For the best popular article on a

1. A

i
I

ichigan Central Rairoadfrom d5is- forestry subject designed to interest
continuing its 7:45 a.m. train to De- the general public in forestry a first
troit was issued by Judge George W.
Sample in circuit court yesterday as prize of $50.00 is being offered by the
the first development in a suit just School of Forestry and Conservation.
began by Dr. James E. Davis, one of The contest is open to undergrad-
Ann Arbor's commuters who would be uates in forestry, including pre-for-
inconvenienced by the proposed estry students, according to Prof. Dow
change, it was announced by Ray E. V. Baxter, who, with Prof. W. Kynoch,
Spokes. ;ompares the supervisory committee.
The injunction will remain in force This award is a continuation of the
until Dec. 23 when a hearing will be Charles Lathrop Pack Foundation
held at which time the railroad must Prize in Forestry, which was estab-
show cause why it should not be made lished in 1923 by a gift of $1,000 from
permanent. Mr. Charles L. Pack, Lakewood, New
Local commuters also filed a com- Jersey. The income from this fund
plaint with the Michigan Public Util- provides this annual prize, Professor
ities commission Friday with Edward Baxter said.
Bryant, Detroit attorney living inI

; I

THE

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U

AIM/fb__ - - re- 0 r- - . -

BEST BUSES 9RT R
FOR YOUR TRIP HOME
DECEBER20pFR:ER .N
LEAVING ANN ARBOR * s-s
D E CE M BER 20 F OR : °R RS '

-Associated Press Photo.
Here is the U.S.S. Cummings, 1,500-ton destroyer named for the
Civil War hero, as she slipped down the ways at Staten Island, where
she was christened.
36, 000 Tons O Coal Is Needed
To Heat University For A Year

Ann Arbor, acting as their represen-
tative.
Both actions came as a result of
an ultimatum made by railroad of-
ficials Thursday night at a meeting
with the commuters when they stated
that service would be discontinued
after today unless a $250 bond was'
posted for a 30-day period to make
up for any deficit incurred.
Hearing in the Davis suit has been
set for Dec. 23.
Dr. James D. Bruce, vice-presidentc
of the University in charge of uni-
versity relations, gave his support to
the local group, stating in a letter to
Mr. Bryant dated Dec. 8 that the re-
moving of this special coach would
result in serious inconveniences for
the gradually growing group doing
laboratory work in the social sciences
in Detroit.
Faculty Joins
With Subdued
/ 1T! ''

The topiCSo 0 the essays must be se-
lected by the entrants, and must be
filed with Miss Mabel Train, the
recorder and secretary to the Dean
of the school of forestry not later than
January 15, he stated. The topics
must be approved by the committee,
as well as any radical changes in
them after the time of filing.
The articles, Professor Baxter
added, should not exceed 2,500 words
and must be typed double space on
one side of the paper only. Proper.
reference must be given for all ma-
terial used that is not original, he
said, and photographs or drawings
may be included. The closing date
for submission of articles is set at
5 p.m., March 15, 1936.
Only one prize of $50.00 is offered
if the number of entrants is five or
less. A second prize of $20.00 will be
offered, however, for six to 10 en-
trants, and a third prize of $5.00 will
be offered if there are more than 11
entrants.
Extracts from last year's articles
may be found in a folder in the For-
estry Library, in the Natural Science

Cleveland - Pittsburgh
Chicago .

* .2:30
* .3:30

P.M.
P.M.

NewYork *hest4r . 4:00 P.M.
Buffalo, Rochester, Scranton 5:00 P.M.

Lowest Holiday Round-Trip Rates
ANN ARBOR To:

But Not All 700,000,000
Pounds Of Steam Goes
For That Purpose
By WILLIAM E. SHACKLETON
From one December to the next it
takes some 36,000 tons of coal to heat
the University, a report released re-
cently by I. W. Truettner, mainten-
ance inspector of the buildings and
grounds department, shows.
Not all of the better than the 700,-
000,000 pounds of steam produced by
the burning of this coal is used for
heating purposes, however. Conden-
sation for hot water circulation and
production of electric current absorb
some 15 per cent of the steam.
Staggering as this volume of steam
is to the imagination, the production
of steam per unit amount of heat re-
quired is the real test of the system's
efficiency. In order to determine
this efficiency the outdo'rs tempera-
ture and volume of space to be heat-
ed must be considered in relation to
the amount of steam generated.
Such a computation for the Uni-
versity heating plant gives the weight
of coal burned in order to heat a room
of 1000 cubic feet one degree above
the outdoors temperature for one day
as 1,286 pounds. This figure is the
average obtained for the 66,000,000
cubic feet which are heated in the
University.
In comparison with results secured
by similar central heating plants this
consumption of coal is quite efficient.
The Uniersity of Chicago in the No-
ember issue of a heating trade jour-
nal published a study closely paral-
leling the one made by Mr. Truettner
here, 'and found that their unit coal

figure is 1.208 pounds for the 1934-
1935 heating season and that their
five-year average ending with 1935
is 1.47 pounds.
Although the latest figure for the
University of Chicago seems slightly
better than the University one, it has
been obtained through the operation
of an entirely new heating plant in-
stalled five years ago; and the volume
of space heated is some 15,000,000
cubic feet less.
In addition to the heating require-
ments the buildings and grounds de-
partment boilers and turbines gener-
ate more than nine-tenths of the elec-
tricity used on the campus. This is
accomplished with comparatively lit-
tle loss of energy by passing high
pressure steam formed in the boilers
through generating turbines, and
sending the outcoming low pressure
steam into the heating tunnels for
distribution throughout the campus,
Mr. Truettner explained.

Buffalo . $10.50
Chicago . 5.40
Cleveland 6.00
New York

Pittsburgh 9.75
Rochester 12.00
Scranton . 17.40
0 18.75

FREDERICK S. RAN DAL L
TRAVEL SERVICE
12 NICKELS ARCADE PHONE 6040

I

1)Wa racii Sts l Building, Professor Baxter said.
IOWA CITY, Ia., Dec. 14. - (R) - NAVAL HERO DIES
Last year's militant pacifists at the LOS ALTOS, Calif., Dec. 14.-(P)
University of Iowa have become so -Commander James Joseph Man-
mild that even faculty support is ac- , C m, James Jseh Man-
corded them. Aing, 58, U. S. N., retired, who fought
Instead of organizing student with Admiral Dewey at the Battle of
strikes for peace, they are now formed Manila Bay, died Friday.
into two study-discussion groups
sponsored by teachers and professors.
They are seeking to make the R. O. 1

Brandeis,
Be NSL

Green To T. C. an elective course, admitting
that "Many college men feel it is
Delevyates good training."

-Ll viv n- &4 aIa..v

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

Fred Brandeis, Grad., and Joseph
Green, '38, will be the official dele-
gates of the National Student League
at the convention for the formation
of a new American Student Union to
be held Dec. 27 and 28 on the campus
of Ohio State University, Brandeis,
chairman of the executive committee
of the local chapter, said yesterday.
Three or four delegates, to be
chosen this week, will represent the
newly organized Michigan chapter of
the Student League for Industrial
Democracy at the convention, accord-
ing to William M. Polk, '36, president.

The student peace movement here
was climaxed last April when 300 stu-
dents walked out of classrooms in a
"strike protest."
The peace seekers became so mili-
tant that another group of students
organized a league for the Promotion
of War, as a protest against peace ag-
itation.

Cel lophaned
Packaged
Bottled
You BET you're particular
about the food you eat and
you re particular about the
Cleanliness of your cleaned

(Continued from Page 4)
brary. Dr. Mowat G. Fraser will
speak on the subject, "My Interviews
with Propagandists."
U. of M. Public Health Club meet-
ing, Monday evening at 8:00 o'clock,
Michigan League. It is to be a very
important meeting and all are urged
to attend.
Monday Evening Drama Section
will meet Monday, Dec. 16, at the
home of Mrs. Carlton Peirce, 2019
Seneca. 7:45 p.m.
Tuesday Play Reading Section of
the Faculty Women's Club will meet
Tuesday, Dec. 17, 2:15 p.m., Alumnae
Room of the Michigan League.
Michigan Dames Christmas meet-
ing at the League Tuesday, 8:00 p.m.
An entertainment is planned. Every-
one is asked to bring a wrapped five
or ten cent gift for the grab-bag. The
Home Making Group will have a Bake'
sale after the meeting.
Michigan Dames Child Study
Group will meet at 8 o'clock Monday,
evening, Dec. 16, Garden Room of the
Michigan League. An appropriate
program has been arranged, and
Christmas stockings will be filled for
unfortunate children. Bring alive
or ten cent gift that will fit in a stock-
ing.
KING A GOOD SHOT
LONDON, Dec. 14.- (P)-Com-
pletely recovered from his illness of
1928, King George is back in his old
form as one of the best marksmen
and hunters in England.

-illl

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e*

KODAKS

garments.

I,

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.

1111

Every Day of the Year

MAKE THE IDEAL GIFT

FOR CHRISTMAS.

OUR

STOCK
SELECT

IS COMPLETE.

YOURS

NOW.

nO!

Give
A MERCHANDISE
CHECK
to your Mother, Wife or
Sister.
She'll appreciate your
thoughtfulness in giving
a gift which she can
selectherself at her own
leisure.
ROSE M JOSSELYN
Kellogg Corset Shop
110 E. Liberty Phone 3110

I

That's why all of GREENE'S
employees have periodic med.
ical examinations.
GREENE'S
CLEANERS S' DYERS
IPCROCLEAN
Phone 23-23-1

FRANCISCO & BOYCE
723 North University

"ON THE CAMPUS SINCE 1905"

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