100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 10, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-12-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

THE MICHICXN 1 XtY

TjTF';lDAV, DEC"EMRER 10, 1935

iTiW111 - - - -DEC M BER-0- -S

University Will
Send Delegates
To Convention
Student Volunteer Group
Will Conduct Meeting In
Indianapolis
Funds to send five additional Uni-
versity delegates to the quadriennial
convention of the Student Volunteer
Movement, to be held Dec. 28 through
Jan. 1 in Indianapolis, will be asked
of the University Socio-Religious
committee, it has been learned.
Several delegates have already been
registered from various churches on
ffie campus, but the full quota of 21
Anerean and five Oriental students
fias not yet been reached. A com-
mittee whose especial purpose has
been to get together the delegates to
the convention is the sponsor of the
move for Socio-Religious committee
bfkfig of the five additional dele-
gates.
The purpose of the convention, ac-
cording to a statement issued by the
Student Volunteer committee after its
nxieeting yesterday, is "to present the
fi'ajor questions of Christian mis-
sions and the opportunities for
trained leaders in various occupa-
tibns abroad."
'i'his year will mark the twelfth
national meeting of the Student Vol-
unteer Movement, and judging by the
advance registrations, this conven-
fiOn will surpass in number all pre-
vionis conventions. In a message re-
ceived by Dr. Edward R. Blakeman,
stiudent religious counselor, from In-
dianapolis yesterday, more than 800
students from 124 colleges and uni-
versities were reported to have signi-
ted their intention of attending.
Many Ann Arbor churches are par-
ticpating in the selection and finan-
cing of the delegation. Those in-
terested in attending the convention
should consult Dr. Blakeman or any
Protestant minister.
nIs 11led
In Week-End
Auto Accident
John Kenny Dies Instantly
In Saline Crash; Arrest
2 For Drunken Driving
One man was killed in week-enC
auto accidents and two were arrested
for drunken driving as rainy and
foggy weather prevailed.
John J. Kenny, 63-year-old York
township farmer, was instantly killed
Sunday night on the Saline-Milan
Road a half mile south of Saline. He
was driving home to Milan when his
. r hit a culvert, turning completely
over and fracturing his skull.
An investigation was made by
Coroner Edwin C. Ganzhorn who said
that no hearing would be necessary.
The body was taken to the Dietiker
Funeral Home in Saline where funer-
al arrangements will be made.
Pleading guilty to a charge of drunk
driving in Justice Jay Payne's court
yesterday morning, Thomas Sloss, Sa-
li*e, paid a fine of $75 and costs of
$10. The alternative was 60 days in
the County Jail. His driver's li-
cense was suspended for a year. Sloss]
was arrested on US 12 near Saline
Sunday night.
Jay Dean, 426 S. Fourth Ave.,
pleaded not guilty to a similar charge
before Justice Harry W. Reading, and

his trial was set for 3 p.m. tomorrow.
He was released on bond of $200.
Dean was arrested by police Sunday
when he was brought to the police
station by a driver who had become
involved in an argument with him
on the corner of State and Huron
Streets -
Strengthen All
Units Of Ary,
Uern Demands
WASHINGTON, Dec. 9. - (P) -
Fighting planes enough "to repel an
invader at the outbreak of hostil-
ities" were sought today for the army
by George H. Dern, Secretary of War.
The annual purchase of 800 air-
craft- half of them for replacement
-was among the recommendations
in Dern's annual report. Such pur-
chases over a five-year period, he
said, would bolster the Army's air
corbat strength tor3,000 units.
Dern also recommended greater
strength for the regular army, the
national guard, reserve officers, cit-
izens' military training camps and
the erection of a new War Depart-
ment building to centralize its work-
ing forces.

Staunchly Support U. S. Entry In Olympiad

GIFT SUGGESTIONS

Classified Directory

-Associated Press Photo
Two of the staunchest supporters of United States participation
in the Olympic Games in Berlin are Avery Brundage (left) of Chicago,
president of the American Olympic Comnittee, and Major Patrick J.
Walsh (right), president of the Metropolitan Association of the A.A.U.,
shown as they discussed their case at the annual A.A.U. convention in
New York, where the Olympics question was heatedly debated.
Governor Goes To Work' At Coulee Dam

THE DAILY
Offers These Timely
Suggestions Of Ann
Arbor Merchants.
FOR HER
GLITTERING Gold Mesh Bags,
Bracelets, and Cowls at L. G. Bal-
four Co. 10A
OVERNIGHT bags, pocket books,
manicure sets, every type of trav-
elling bag and make-up kit. Lea-
ther goods from a leather store are
best. Wilkinson's, 325 S. Main St.
8A.
McLEAN'S CHOCOLATES, 4 pound
box at $1.00. Bunte's French Mix-
ture, 2/2 pound box at $1.25. B. E.
Muehlig, 216 S. Main. 21A.
A TYPEWRITER: We have all makes.
New or reconditioned. Office and
portable machines. Priced $25 up.
Liberal terms if desired. A large
and select stock. O. D. Morrill, 314
S. State St. 18A
BOOK PLATES: A large assortment.
Printed with name at small addi-
tional cost. One day service. O. D.
Morrill, 314 South State. St. 19A
DIARIES, SCRAP BOOKS - Photo-
graph albums, address books, per-
sonal letter files, book ends, letter
openers, etc. A large and choice
assortment in attractive designs.
Good quality merchandise at con-
siderate prices. O. D. Morrill, 314
S. State St. 20A.
HOSIERY, scarfs, handbags, flowers-
make ideal gift suggestions at Rob-
ert's Shop, 604 E. Liberty.
ARTCRAFT HOSIERY makes the
perfect gift. Boxes of 3 pairs at
$2.75 and $3.85. Elizabeth Dillon
Shop. 4A
WE SUGGEST Coty's Haubigant's
and Yardley's perfume sets. Haus-
man's Pharmacy. 601 E. Liberty.
2A.
GIVE an unusual gift. A pillow or
shoe tees. Polhemus Hat Shop.
613 E. William. 6A.

FOUNTAIN PENS and PENCILS -
Desk bases, desk sets.Leading na-
tionally advertised makes, Parker,
Schaeffer, Waterman, Conklin,1
Wahl, Eversharp; etc. Large choice
stock priced $1 and up. O. D. Mor-
rill, 314 S. State St. 15A.
LEATHER GOODS: Some with zip-
pers. Travelling cases, bill folds,
cigar and' cigarette cases, card
cases, loose leaf note books, port-
folios, brief cases, key cases, etc.
O.D. Morrill, 314 S. State St. 15A.
TYPEWRITER TABLES-Metal and
wood. O. D. Morrill, 314 S. State
St. 14A.
STAEB AND DAY at 309 S. Main,
the downtown store for Michigan
men, presents luxurious ties at
$1.00 and $1.50 in beautiful Christ-
mas boxes. 22A.
ALL LEATHER GOODS, including
billfolds, toilet cases, traveling bags,
key cases and portfolioss. Buy your
leather goods at a leather store.
Wilkinson's, 325 S. Main St. 7A
A PHILCO
From Dick Radio Co.
327 S. Main Dial 7991
9A
AN ATTRACTIVE set of leather let-
ter case, billfold and key case at
L. G. Balfour Co. 11A
FOR FATHER
COMPLETE line of smoking items -
toilet articles, including famous
Schick Dry Shaver. Carlson'sfPhar-
macy, 1112 S. University. lA
WE WRAP and mail boxes of Christ-
mas cigars. Housman's Pharmacy,
601 E. Liberty. 3A
FOR EVERYONE

FOR HIM

NOTICES
STATIONERY: Printed with your1
naime and address. 100 sheets, 100
envelopes. $1.00. Many styles.
Craft Press, 305 Maynard. 9x
MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x E
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: White gold Waltham wrist
watch. Call 2-3281. Virginia W. J
Wagner. 159
'Keep Out': That's
War Policy Of U.S.
CHICAGO, Dec. 9.-(P) -Presi-
dent Roosevelt gave a luncheon au-
dience today a short statement of the
Country's war policy: "Keep out."
"You and I," he said, "know that we
have no intention of getting mixed up
in the wars of the world.
"We all hope that when the rest of
the world sees the example set that
it will take a leaf from the notebook
of the United States and cease much
of this strife."
The President spoke betore 300 per-
sons in the Saddle and Sirloin Club,
at the Chicago Stockyards, after ad-
dressing the American Farm Bureau
Federation.
School of Social
Dancing
Taught daily, 10 to 10.
Terrace Garden Studio
Wuerth Theater Bldg.
Rhone 9695
Read The W1/ant Ads

LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox
Careful work at low price.

darnd.
lx

CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY. Any
old and new suits, overcoats at $3
to $20. Don't sell before you see
Sam. Phone for appointments.
2-3640. lox
O UR NE W
LOAN
PLAN
GET UP TO $300
JUST ON YOUR
SIGNATURE....
The fact that you have a
steady job with a wellhestab-
lished firm gives you a good
credit standing with us! Make
use of itl Let us advance you
the cash you need NOW.
ALL THE TIME YOU
NEED TO REPAY!
We have 6 other loan plans
for single and married people
that allow as long as 20 months.
P E R 5 0 N A L
FINANCE COMPANY
Second Floor - Wolverine Bldg.
Room 208 Phone 4000-4001
Cor. Washington & 4th

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Pi Beta Phi sorority pin on
campus. Finder please return to
Edith Merickel. Phone 7526. 156
LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x

.:I

Schaeberle Music House

:I'

203 East Liberty

Phone 6011

Ready to supply you with all your Musical Wants: Instruments
for Band, Orchestra, and Home. First Class Instrument Repair
Department. We would like to count you among our many
satisfied customers.
BALDWIN PIANOS SCHILLEIR PIANOS,

|l

COMPACTS - A complete collection,
singles, doubles, triples, loose pow-
der. In silver, gold, cloisonne, some
with pepete point inserts; cigarette
cases and combination lighters and
cases, 59c to $3.95. Jacobson's,
612-618 East Liberty 13A.

SISTER pins, rings, fraternity jew-
elry, exclusive gifts; correct insignia
for all fraternities and sororities.
Burr, Patterson & Auld, 603
Church. 12A.
PERSONAL - GREETING CARDS -
Printed with your name, one day
service. Large attractive assort-
ment in a complete range of prices.
O. D. Morrill, 314 S. State St. 17A

.___._.. _. A__.. _ _ ____.._ ._._.
---__ _._-- ...9aa-wz x __aO e Il llĀ®II I ii Y .
y_
.. s.. ... a. r,. ., ,. ...v

MAJESTIC

LAST TIMES TODAY

-Associated Press Photw.
Dressed in the garb of a laborer and wearing hip boots, Gov.
Clarence D. Martin of Washington emptied the first bucket of concrete
in the base of the giant Grand Coulee Dam across the Columbia River.
A thousand or more persons cheered the official pouring, which marked
the first upward progress of the $63,000,000 power and irrigation dam.
Follow-Up Examination Stressed
As Important By Dr. Forsythe

HARRY M . C O E T Z prss*nts an
EDWARD SMALL
produclJoo

One of the most difficult tasks fac-
ing the University Health Service and
one which seems to defy all medicalI
knowledge is that of getting students
to return for "follow-up" examina-
tions, according to Dr. Warren G,
Forsythe, director of the University
Health Service.
"This is the thing which is both-
ering us most at present," Dr. For-
sythe said. "We have no way of
knowing the exact number of stu-
dents who disregard this service, but
we feel that the number is much larg-
er than it should be. The majority of
them seem to be very apathetic in
this respect."
Letters are sent every year to all
freshmen whose health examinations
have shown them to possess import-
ant defects or defects of possible im-
portance, inviting them to have a
follow-up examination. That many
of them do take advantage of this
opportunity is evident from the re-
port of the last freshman class, Dr.
Forsythe said. Seventeen per cent of
the entering students showed no de-
fects at all, while 73 per cent showed
defects of possible importance. The
other 10 per cent possessed defects
that would probably interfere with
their student activities. At the end
of the year this number had been re-
LABOR PALEY IN CHILE
GENEVA, Dec. 9. - (A') - With the
United States actively participating,
an All-American special labor con-
ference will be held at Santiago,
Chile, beginning Jan. 2 under the
auspices of the International Labor
Organization.

duced to 4 per cent, or a reduction in
this group of 60 per cent.
How many of the remaining 40 per
cent and of the larger group of 73 per
cent had not availed themselves of
follow-up examinations is the ques-
tion facing University medical au-
thorities. They emphasized that this
service is offered for the benefit of
the students and it is to their own
advantage to return for a follow-up
examination.
Roosevelt Upholds
ReligiousLiberties
SOUTH BEND, Ind., Dec. 9. -(P)
--President Roosevelt in receiving
an honorary degree from Notre Dame
University amid deafening cheers and
applause, today lifted the "great torch
of liberty of human thought, liberty
of human conscience" for guidance of
other nations, "if they will accept it."
"Long ago," he said, "George Ma-
son, in Virginia's Declaration of
Rights, voiced what has become one
of the deepest convictions of the
American people; religion, or the dutyj
which we owe to our Creator, and the
manner of discharging it, can be di-
rected only by reason and conviction,
not by force or violence, and there-
fore all men are equally entitled to the
free exercise of religion according to
the dictates of conscience."
BODY FOUND IN BARN
ADRIAN, Dec. 9. -(P) - The body
of Emmett Drake, 42 years old, a
farm hand, was found hanging Sat-
urday in a barn on the property of
former Judge J. N. Sampson.

Superficalt
Of Education
Hit B Brewer
President Of Olivet Claims
Curricula Must Contain
QualitativeSubjects
The need for a qualitative rather
than a quantitative treatment of sub-
jects in acquiring a liberal education
was stressed by Dr. Joseph H. Brewer,
Jr., Sunday night in his talk before
the Student Group of the Congre-
gational Church.
Dr. Brewer, who is president of
Olivet College, spoke enthusiastically
of the tutorial, or Oxford, system of
teaching that is being carried on at
his institution for the second year.
He said the experiment has proven
highly successful in the brief period
it has been tried at Olivet.
By the tutorial method, Dr. Brewer
said, the difficulty that has arisen
out of present day practices, namely
the spreading out widely but thinly of
our educational curricula, could be
overcome. "The needs of democ-
racy," he said, "require that we get
back into the main stream of the
current leading to a liberal educa-
tion."
A brief resume or tne growth of
American schools and how that
growth has been affected by Euro-
pean institutions was given by the
speaker. "Harvard and the early col-
leges in this country took their main
pattern from Oxford and Cambridge,"
Dr. Brewer pointed out. "A little later
on when science and the technical
theories started developing at a more
rapid rate, the American universities
turned to the continental schools,
especially those of Germany.
"From that time on, the attempt in
our college has been to establish the
highly-technical functions of the ad-
ministrative departments."

Faculty Womens' Clubs
To Hold Meetings Today
Two sections of the Faculty Wom-
en's Club will hold meetings today,
the Bookshelf and Stage at 2:45 p.m.
at the home of Mrs. George McCon-
key, Ann Arbor Hills, and the Biblio-
philes at 2:30 p.m. at the home of
Mrs. J. F. Rettger, 510 Forest Ave.
The Bibliophiles, who are studying
the subject of Italian authors, will
discuss Giovanni Papini, author of
"The Life of Christ," according to
Mrs. Frank R. Finch,.chairman of the
program committee.

** -Big Double Feature
---_TOMORROW
"RETURN OF PETER GRIMM" j

Program -
"TO BEAT THE BAND"

A"""

61 1 E. WILLIAM ST.

SOME
advertise price alone . . .
they have nothing else to
offer.
Printing, to be effective,
must have Quality. We
specialize in QUALITY
PRINTING . . . and our
Service is never disap-
pointing.
LOWERY
Printer

I

PHONE 8758

Al

i

.

15c to 6-25c After 6
vHITNEY
-_ Now
Edward Everett Horton
"His Night Out"
-with -

MONEY
Received or sent is most conveniently handled through BANK
MONEY ORDERS. They are simple, inexspensive and trans-
ferable anywhere. Specify them to those sending you money.
RATES
$25.00 and Under - 10c $25.00 to $100. - 15c

BOSTON SYMPHONY
ORCH ESTRA
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Conductor
110-PLAYERS 110
Wed1 Dee. 11-48:15

i
,

G

U

i

i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan