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December 01, 1935 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-12-01

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TT1~MICHIGAN DIAILY

Pauck Speaks
On Religion Of
StudentGroup
Finds Them 'Religiously
Illiterate' As Result Of
Present Era
"Many of our students are re-
ligiously illiterate," stated Dr. Wil-
helm Pauck, professor of Church His-
tory at the Chicago Theological Sem-
inary, in a talk yesterday afternoon in
the Ethel Fountain Hussey Room of
the League.
"However," Dr. Pauck continued,
"we;cannot blame the students alone
for this apparent religious indiffer-
ence. Students are merely reflecting
the tendencies of the present era. The
tendency of the younger generation,
to ignore the Bible is but a result
of our social and cultural institu-
tions."
One of the most important things
to be accomplished by an individual,
according to Dr. Pauck, is the dis-
covery of the underlying philosophy
of life. "That is why," he continued,
"students should have a serious re-
gard for religion, for religion deals
directly with this fundamental prob-
lem of finding the underlying phil-
osophy, the real meaning of life."
The subject of Dr. Pauck's talk was
"The Wistful Collegian." In con-
nection with the thought embodied in
such a title, Dr. Pauck said that the
students of American colleges and
universities have not the opportunity
for real independent thought and de-
liberation upon the manifold prob-
-lems that confront them. He gave
the practice of living in dormitories
and fraternities as one of the chief
reasons for this. "Our lives consist
every largely in making decisions, and
although living with other students
helps the individual in getting along
with people later in life, it is not
surprising that the individual ex-
periences such a vagueness of general
orientation into the world."
In his point that the student should
regard religion in a more serious light
than is done at present, Dr. Pauck
quoted Prof. Whitehead of Harvard,
whose definition of religion is: "Re-
ligion is what a man does with his
solitariness."
Solitariness, said Dr. Pauck, should
be utilized in serious thought upon
the many changes that are going on
about us. "On all the campi through-I
out the country," the doctor con-I
tinued, "questions regarding peace
and the imminent changes in our so-
cial order receive consideration from
the students. The problem of find-
ing the underlying philosophy of life
with which religion deals, should re-
ceive just as serious attention."
Dr. Pauck concluded with the re-
mark that "To discover and de-
velop an adequate religion is the chief
duty of your generation."

Extent Of Inter-State Criminal
Mobility Is Revealed In Report

60 University
Women Listed
By Who's Who

Classified Directory

Lottier Holds Automobiles
Call For Change In Law
Enforcement Practice
By BERNARD E. WEISSMAN
The extent of the problem of ex-
ultant fugitives and disgruntled
minions of the law on opposite sides
of the state line is being determined
in a research project that will be
completed within a few months by
Mr. Stuart Lottier of the sociology
department.
For the past two years Mr. Lottier
has been conducting the investiga-
tion of the degree of mobility in the
modern crime picture, under the di-
rection of Prof. Arthur E. Wood, and
the results bear out the need for
some system of inter-state coopera-
tion in dealing with non-federal of-
fenses.
The rise of the automobile as a
major tool in the hands of the crim-
inal, according to Mr. Lottier, makes
a reinterpretation of law enforce-
ment procedure necessary, in view of
the greatly enlarged area in which
individual criminals operate.
Cites Lack Of Cooperation
He pointed out the present "com-
plete lack of interstate cooperation,"
and advised general adoption of
"crime compacts,' which are a form
of cooperation by groups of several
states recommended by the federal
government.
Mr. Lottier's research, being made
in Detroit, deals with the range of
operations by criminals apprehended
by the Detroit police department,
and is being taken from the records
of police requests for information
from other cities and states, from
the out-of-town toll calls of the De-
troit police, from the criminal rec-
ords of 500 typical offenders and
from confessions of the criminals
themselves.
The cases of the typical offenders,
taken from descriptive folders in the
department's "photograph file," show
that 32.6 per cent of the offenders
had also committed crimes in at
least one other city, and that, ex-
cept for Ohio, the most frequent
scenes of operation were not in the
states adjoining Michigan. Ohio
ranked first in this respect, but was
followed in order by New York, Mis-
souri, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Massa-
chusetts, Indiana, California and
Kentucky.
Pick Outstate Cities
More offenses were committed by
these 500 persons in Chicago, St.
Louis, Cleveland, New York and
Pittsburgh than in any Michigan
city, further indicating the degree of
criminal mobility.
Mr. Lottier has drawn up a sep-
arate report of the criminal activ-
ities of John Dillinger as illustra-
tive of the new problems with which

the forces of the law have to con-
tend, and has prepared a diagram
map showing the movements of the
notorious criminal through eight
states from the time of his escape
from the Lake County Jail in Crown
Point, Ind., to the recovering in
Chicago on May 2, 1934, of the sedan
in which he had escaped from St..
Paul, Minn., a week and a half prev-
iously.
Cars Permit Rapid Escape ]
The conclusions which Mr. Lottier1
will draw from his research are the:
following: (1) that the automobile
has fundamentally altered the terri-
torial conception of crime through1
"rapid escape," through urbaniza-
tion of the population and decrease
of sharply defined city and country
areas, and through the opening up
of suburban towns and relatively-1
removed small cities to the depre-
dations of the big-city criminal; (2)
that police organization, based upon
pre-automobile conceptions, is a
hindrance rather than an aid to ap-
prehension of fugitives, as evidenced
by disunion, by the policy of 'float-
ing' alleged delinquents and crim-
inals on to other cities, by the lack
of incentive for inter-city coopera-
tion, by legal and practical difficul-
ties in such apprehension, and by
partial failure of the police to recog-
nize the problem of criminal mo-
bility: (3) that there is greater mo-
bility, in general, among offenders
against property than against per-.
sons; (4) that new conceptions of
police work are being adopted as
evidenced by extension of federal
jurisdiction, 'gentlemen's agree-
ments' between counties, inter-state
compacts, and informal agreements
between chiefs of police; and (5)
that boundaries of crime regions
should be kept flexible to take care
of changing conditions.
France's Position Is
Weak, Says Watkins
(Continued from Page 1)
abandoned the gold standard while
France has attempted to maintain it.
The depreciation of the dollar and
the pound against gold, Professor
Watkins declared, has resulted in a
"considerable overvaluation" of the
franc, since France has kept her gold
price unchanged. As an example, he
I cited the fact that an advance in our
gold price of $35 increased the cost
of the franc to Americans from ap-
proximately four cents to approxi-
mately six and six-tenths cents.
"As an immediate result," Profes-
sor Watkins pointed out, "French
goods and services became dearer to
us and our exports became cheaper
to Frenchmen. This situation has
placed France at a comparative dis-
advantage in world trade, and it has
augmented her unfavorable trade
balance, forcing her to impose addi-
tional tariffs and quotas."
The general opposition in France
to the devaluation of the franc, he
declared, is traceable partly to dif-
ferences in viewpoint as to the proper
method of recovery and partly to
French experience with inflation and
devaluation in the recent past.
With devaluation of the franc re-
jected, Professor Watkins said,
France's disadvantage in world trade
can be removed "only by a fall in
French prices and costs sufficient to
offset the devaluation of other coun-
tries, or by a rise in prices and costs
of comparable magnitude." Al-
though these developments have oc-
curred in part, he pointed out, the
'franc is* still overvalued, and this
overvaluation tends to depress French
prices and to draw gold away from
France.
There are also "serious internal
difficulties" growing out of the de-
flation program, in addition to "this
international maladjustment," in the
opinion of Professor 'Watkins. "Un-
employment, declining revenues and

the like have occasioned substantial
budgetary deficits. And attempts to
reduce government expenses have en-
gendered strong opposition and oc-
casional cabinet crises," he said.
It would have been better for
France, Professor Watkins asserted,
if she had joined the procession of
devaluing nations.

One In
Noted

Every Twenty Of
Michigan Grads

Are AlumnaejI
(Continued from Page 1)
Georgiana Post, '04, who is president
of the Detroit Atlas Bleacher Co.
Mrs. Post makes bleachers for col-
leges, schools and parks. Road
scrapers and snow plows are man-
ufactured by another enterprising
alumna, Marie J. Root, who is vice-
president and general manager of
the Root Spring Scraper Co. of Kal-
amazoo.
Mrs. Lilian Molle Gilbreth is one
of the few alumnae engineers, and
has become nationally known for her
work as president of Gilbreth, Inc.,
consulting engineers. She is one of
the two honorary members of the
American Society of Industrial En-
gineers, the other one being Herbert
Hoover. But in spite of her work in
engineering, Mrs. Gilbreth has found
time to raise 11 children, and write
a book about it besides, called "The
Home Maker and Her Job."F
Woman Druggist Listed
Another unique occupation for a
woman is that of Julia Emanuel, '89,
who is the only woman druggist in
the country. It was estimated a few
years ago that she had put up a
quarter million prescriptions in her
drug store in Fort Wayne, Ind. Miss
Emanuel employs only women as-
sistants in her store. Feminine doc-
tors too are listed among the Who's
Who files of the Alumnus. Mrs.
Bertha S. Dyment, '08M, who taught
physical education before she grad-
uated, is medical adviser to women
at Stanford University. Another
noted physician is Dr. Marion Craig
Potter, who has practiced medicine
for 50 years, and is now practicing
with her son. Dr. Harriet Baker
Hyde, 'OOM, was for 27 years a mem-
ber of the medical and surgery staff
of Greenwich Hospital, Greenwich,
Conn., and was secretary of the
training school for nurses during the
war.
Heads Research Group
An interesting and successful bus-
iness is carried on by Christine Hal-
ler, '03, who is head of Research
Service, Inc. Miss Haller, was a
member of the staff of the Library
of the Board of Commerce, estab-
lished to furnish business men with
economic information during the
war and the reconstruction period,
but left there in 1918 to establish her
own company.
The sciences seem to have at-
tracted few alumnae, but one woman
achieved prominence in this
field. Anna Mae Lutz, '93, is well
known as a cytologist, and has made
several important discoveries in the
field of biology.
Another unique field, industrial
toxicology, is represented in the list
by the work of Alice Hamilton, '93M,
who has made an exhaustive study
of industrial diseases. She worked
for many years at Hull House, and
is the only woman member of the
Health Committee of the League of
Nations. In addition, Miss Hamilton
is the only woman ever invited to the
medical faculty of Harvard Univer-
sity.
GARNER LEAVES JAPAN
YOKOHAMA, Japan, Nov. 30. -
(A') - Vice-President John N. Garner
and his congressional party sailed for
Seattle aboard the liner President
Jefferson today, returning from the
voyage in which the group attended
the inauguration of the Philippine
commonwealth government.
TODAY - Mon., Tues.

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
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Minimum three lins per insertion.
10' discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
By contriact, per line - 2 lines daily, one
month... ..................8c
4 lines E.0.D., 2 months ........8c
2 lines daily college year........7c
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100 lines used as desired..........9c
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1,000 lines used as desired.........7c
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The above rates are per reading line,
based on eig'ht reading lines per inch.
Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
Se per line to above rate; for all capital
letters. Add Geper line to above for
bold face, upper and lowe r case. Add 10c
per line to above rates for bold faceI
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7x2 point
type.
LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned,
Careful work at lov price. lx
WANTED
WANTED: Used portable typewriter.
Remington, Underwood or Corona.
Alice Ambrose. Phone 2-2494. 136
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY. Any
old and new suits, overcoats at $3
to $20. Don't sell before you see
Sam. Phone for appointments.
2-3640. lox

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: In vicinity of stadium after
the Ohio State game, white gold
Longenes wrist watch. Braided
leather strap with white gold snap.
Phone 8671. Reward. 141
LOST: Ladies white gold Elgin wrist
watch -white gold strap. Phone
3664. Reward. 137
LOST: Black silk purse, Saturday.
Finder please return to Miss Pau-
line Frank, 1465 W. 84th St., Cleve-
land, O. Reward. 140
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: First class violin and
clarinet. In excellent condition,
514 E. William. Ph. 2-3611. 122

I

SUNDAY, DECEMBER, 1, 1935
TA HONORED AT LAST
AN1-fo stone statue of Santa
Claus, to be unveiled Dec. 22 at Santa
Claus, Ind., was completed by a Chi-
cago firm today.
The figure will be dedicated Christ-
mas day, the eightieth anniversary
of the naming of the village. It will
surmount a Christmas group at Santa
Claus Park.
SAVE 20"
by our
CHRISTMAS
LAY - A - WAY
PLAN
0
The TIME SHOP
1121 So. University Ave.
WATER
, SOFTENER-
SALT
-I
For All Makes
of Water
Sof l E n(-os
SNOW SHOVELS
All Kinds
At All Prices
aii
Dial .2-1713
RSOUTHOS
210 SOUTH ASHLEY

FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Furnished apartment.
Living-room, bedroom, kitchenette,
private bath including utilities and
extension telephone. Swezey, 513
Thompson. 139
FOR RENT: Single room $3.00 per
week. One half block from campus.
514 Cheever, 8628. 134
NOTICES
STATIONERY: Printed with your
name and address. 100 sheets, 100
envelopes. $1.00. Many styles.
Craft Press, 305 Maynard. 9a
MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
HOME-COOKED MEALS at Mrs. J.
L. Hampton's Tea Room. Five
course Sunday dinner from 12:30
to 3:00 p.m. 605 Forest.
FARM PROGRAM IN COURTS
WASHINGTON, Nov. 30. - P) -
Five charges of unconstitutionality
were directed at the New Deal's farm
program in a brief filed with the,
Supreme Court today by the Hoosac
Mills of Massachusetts.
When you see the little
Yellow and Blue Austin
skimming around in
splendid
SHOE SERVICE
to others-
Aren't you jealous? Why
not Call 6898 and enjoy the
best. It cost no more.

MICHIGAN

ENDS TODAY

IN PERSON

Money From Galens Tag Drive
To Aid Workshop for Invalids

The Comedy Riot from Rudy Vallee's "Sweet Music"
FRANK and MILT
BRITTON and Band

WALTER
POWELL

By DONALD T. SMITH
Imagine a ten-year old child af-
flicted with a serious leg disease, in
a wheel-chair, happily engaged in
painting a toy he helped construct,
smiling and gay as he works, think-
ing nothing 'of his plight nor his
months of hospitalization.
The child knows little of the work
of medical science to relieve his suf-
ferings, but he does know that every
day he can wheel himself up'to the
ninth floor of the University Hos-
pital and pass away the hours in the
fully-equipped workshop that Galens
has provided for him.
The workshop was organized in
1928 through the efforts of Galens
honorary medical fraternity, and is
financed by the money the society
raises in its annual tag-day drives.
This year Galens will hold their tag-
day on Tuesday and Wednesday, Dec.j
3 and 4.
The shop is open six days a week,
and is under the supervision of a
licensed and experienced teacher in
manual arts. Since last November,
646 children have made use of the
shop. Ninety of them were under
eight years old, and 438 were from
7 to 13 years old.
One to ten days is the average time
spent in the shop by the handicapped
children, although some of them
are hospitalized over a period of
years. A very few of the children
are equipped with all normal facul-
ties but are possessed of some dis-
order which may not be discernable.
Many come in beds, wheel-chairs, on'
crutches, with a bandage over one
eye, one arm in a cast or sling, an
exposed wound or some other af-
fliction.
The aim of the shop, explained
Miss Dorothy Ketcham, director of
the social service department of the
hospital, is not to teach cabinet mak-
ing and fine shop work to these
younger boys and girls, but rather

to assist the childrenhin orienting
themselves, to give them a taste
of shop work, to relieve the monotony
of the hospital routine, and espe-
cially to teach them to use tools, to
plan their work, and to carry out
their plans.
According to Miss Ketcham, thej
boy usually draws his own patterns,
selects his wood, or other material,
finds the correct tools, finishes his
produce, and cleans up his bench
when he is finished. The habits
which he forms in the shop will be
useful all through his life.
New books, patterns and charts
are given the new child, who may
spend some time deciding on the type
of work in which he is interested
or what he would like to make. This
provides an opportunity to look
around and become acquainted be-
fore he begins actual work.
To assist the children who are in
wheel-chairs, beds, etc., the shop
has been organized so that each child
can reach his material, select tools,
and keep them in order.
"In general, the boys lean toward
woodworking," Miss Ketcham point-
ed out, "but for the few who have
had some experience in industrial
arts and who are older, other depart-
ments have been added, such as con-
crete work, electrical work; brass
work, and copper.
"For two very definite reasons, the
materials used are usually scraps.
The first reason is the lack of funds,
which prevents very extensive buy-
ing of materials, and secondly, it is
wise for a boy in modest circum-
stances to discover what really fine
articles can be made from a crate, a
tin can, and a coat of paint."
A record is kept of the attend-
ance of each child in the shop and
what he does. When the child's at-
tendance justifies it, a report of the
work completed is sent to the child's
school where credit is often given
him.

Stars of the Ziegfeld Follies
The Maddest, Craziest, Cleverest
Musical Show This Side of Sanity.
CRAZY RHYTHM
A Melody Mad Revue
Beautiful Girls - Riotous Comedy
25 - STAGE STARS - 25

Modern-Age
Dancers
A
Two
VALORS

TITO TRIO

-

-I ON SCREEN j-

I-

EDMUND GWENN in the Laugh Mystery Hit!
"The Bishop Misbehaves"
with MAUREEN O'SULLIVAN
MONDAY ;-

SHOE REPAIR SHOP
426 Thompson

"So Red The Rose"
- Monday Night Guest Feature -___-
"LIVES OF A BENGAL LANCER"

WITH A GRAND
CAST

I

ONLY 25c UNTIL
2 P.M. TODAY

I

"BROADWAY gMELODY
OF 1936"
All-Star Cast
SPENCER TRACY in
"THE MURDER MAN"
"Good Little Monkey" - Cartoon
- Wednesday - Thursday --
RICHARD E. BYRD'S
"LITTLE AMERICA"
and EDMUND LOWE
"BLACK SHEEP"

1~''I1

m

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I I

SHOWS CONTINUOUS
SUNDAY-1 to 11 p.m.
SHOWS
1-3-5-7-9
Let's GO.
TO THE GIANT
SHOW!

---PRICES --
Sunday Matinee
until 2 p.m. 25c
TMAJESTIC hereafter '
All Seats .-3 c
WHATEVER YOU WANT ... IT'S GOT ...
AND WHAT IT'S GOT... YOU WANT!

Iii

._.._ ._._.T ___ _
____ ___.___ _ _ _.___ _ r__ _._._ .. ....

Hm HJ1

I L

4 A

\\ /
*4%V IN
Ike
J , o, 1

Starring DICK
POWELLI
ANN DVORAK
PA T SY KE LL Y
PAUL WHITEMAN
and BAND with RAMONA
RUBINOFF
RAYMOND WALBURN
YACHT CLUB BOYS

A ANY SEAT - ANY DAY

WHITN Y 15cANY SEAT - ANY DAY
WHITNEY to6-5cfter6
First Ann Arbor Showing! a FEdward Arnold

"
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111

11tl

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