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September 24, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-09-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,I

PAGE -TWQ

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

SEPTEMBER 24, 1935

University Is Granted N.Y.A Allotment,

4.

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Classified Directory

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Student ehef
Will Continue
During Year
Allotment Of $15,000 Is
Granted University For
Aid Each Month
Propose Two New
Graduate Programs
Employment Bureau Gives
Outline Of Its Services
To Employables
An allotment of $15,000 monthly
for this school year has been granted
the University under the terms of the
National Y o u t h Administration
which supplants the Federal Emer-
gency Relief Administration as the
agency for Federal aid to students,
it has been announced by Prof. L.
M. Gram, chairman of the Committee
on Student Relief Employment and
a member of the engineering college
faculty.
Two new programs, both devised
for the aid of graduate students, will
be innovated this year, - Professor
ram also} disclosed.
Undergraduates who receive aid
from the $15,000 allotment, under
terms of the NYA, will not be allowed
to work more than 30 hours in one
week or 8 hours in one day, or receive
less than $10 or more than $20 a
month, and their hourly wage rate
will be 40 cents. At this rate the
allotment, determined by a percent-
ag :basis upon the enrollment last
October, will benefit approximately
1,000 students, Professor Gram esti-
mated.
There remains a possibility, he said,
that more than 1,000 students will be
aided. If the'committee, in its in-
terviews with relief students through-
out the first semester of this year,
finds that some are receiving more
than they need, the average monthly
wage will be lessened by giving such
students less work, Professor Gram
explained, and more students will be
employed.'
Under the first of the newly-de-
vised programs, a monthly allotment
of $1,150 had been granted for grad-
uate students in their first year of
study. A student in this category
may receive aid from the undergrad-
uate grant, the amount to be decided
by the committee, and an additional
$10 monthly from the special grant.
Thus, a graduate student in his first
year of study may, if the committee
finds his financial status warrants it,
receive a maximum of $30 a month.
This secial grant of $1,150 was deter-

Hads Orientation

Room 103, Romance Language Build- Student Averages
ing, as soon as possible.eneIe

It was explained that the work done'
by relief students must be of a na-
ture that would not be done otherwise,
thus being in compliance with the
NYA. The purpose of this ruling,4
Professor Gram said, is to avoid tak-
ing possible employment from the
unemployed man. This work will
include such jobskas clerical, library
and research work.
At the University Employment Bu-
reau in the office of the Dean of Stu-
dents, Room 2, University Hall, stu-
dents may apply for board and room
jobs, steady part-time jobs, and odd
jiobs.
The established rate for this em-
ployment is 35 cents an hour. This
would call for 8 hours work a week
for a room and slightly more than
3 hours a day for board. Part-time
jobs and odd jobs are paid on a cash
basis.
The bureau was described by its
officials as an agency which brings the
employer into contact with the em-
ploye, arranging interviews and plac-
ing students in the type of work for
which they are best fitted.
The bulk of the jobs will be made
known to the bureau during the first
few days of this week by the employ-
ers and, according to bureau officials,
the students on hand at that time will
be the most likely to be placed in po-
sitions.
JEWISH NEW YEAR CARDS
A Large and Choice
Selection at
0. D. MORRILL'S
314 South State Street

Down Last Year
(Continued from Page 1)
dropped pledges have been omitted
from both fraternity and independent
averages. The grades have been in-
cluded in the all-men and all-women
groups, however.
Delta Zeta, 17th in 1933-34, has
replaced Chi Omega as sorority leader
with an average of 83.0. Phi Alpha
Kappa has risen from eighth to take
first place among the fraternities with
an average of 82.2.
Nu Sigma Nu, medical group, again
leads all the professional fraternities,
and Alumnae retains first place
among women's dormitories and
league houses.
Church St.
Barber Shop%
6 07 Church St..

ROOMS
SENIOR woman with pleasant room
wishes upper class or graduate
roommate. Dial 3851. 3
ROOM: 411 N. State. One double
room on second floor at $2.50 per
person. Phone 4742.
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 1x
LAUNDRY Wanted. Student and
Co-ed. Men's shirts 10c. Silks,
wools our specialty. All bundles
done separately --no markings.
Personal satisfaction guaranteed.
Call for and deliver. Phone 5594
anytime until 7:00. Silver Laundry
607 E. Hoover. 4x

NOTICE
TEACHER of popular and classical1
piano music. Helen Louise Barnes.
Call 8469. 2x I

FOR SALE
EOR SALE: Large fraternity gas
range. 1511 Washtenaw. Dial 3851.
2

h. I

ill

ily

11

MACS
cient

NOTICES
TAXI -4289. Try our ef--
service. All new caps. 3x

EI

1

PROF. PHILLIP BURSLEY
mined upon a basis of 20 per cent of
the non-professional master's degrees
given last June, allowing $10 for each
person in this group.
The second program to be innovat-
ed this year offers aid to those grad-
uate students beyond their first year
of study. This grant, determined
upon a percentage basis of doctor's
degrees given last June, will be of
$2,010 monthly, but no student in this
category will be allowed aid from the
undergraduate fund. Under limita-
tions prescribed by the NYA, this
student may receive a maximum of
$40 a month.
The committee will decide how
many hours and at what hourly rate
graduate students in both of these
programs will work. The committee,
Professor Gram reports, has notified
all students whose applications have
been considered whether they have
been accepted. He also urged students
desirous of NYA aid to register in
- - -
Phone 7400 for ...
A soft water shampoo
and finger wave at 50c.
A Manicure at 50c
COLL NS'
BEAUTY SHOPPE
Tel. 7400 618 E. Liberty

See - --
GEORGE SHEFFOD
For Fine Tailoring
OFFICIAL TAILOR
FOR VAN BOVEN'S

It's an Old
For The Incorning Class To Migrate
To The Home Of Quality, Price, and Value!
We Have Served Michigan
And Her Students For
Fifty-One Years--
Featuring Complete Departments
in
Drugs - Kodaks - Photographic Supplies -
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and Cigarettes
Announcing - the Opening of
our new Cosmetic Department under the
personal direction of Miss Ann Hinkle, for-
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Where You Will Find Interested And Intelligent
Service and Lowest Prices Consistent With Quality
Merchandise.

I

EXPERT
WORKMANSHIP
COURTESY
and
SERVICE

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DAILY 1:30 to 11 P.M.
W H IT NEY
15c to 6 P.M. -- 25c after 6
Today - Wednesday
GENE STRATTON PORTER'S
eeper O
The Bees"
Extra
COLOR CARTOON
MUSICAL NOVELTY
LATEST NEWS EVENTS
Thurs., Fri., Sat. -
JOE E. BROWN
"Alibi Ike"
and
WILEY POST
"Air Hawks"
Next Sunday
GR AC E MOOR E
in "LOVE ME FOREVER"

CALKINS-FLETCH ER
Our Three Stores Are Located
Conveniently Throughout Ann Arbor.
324 South State 818 South State
201 South Fourth
Save By Our Low Prices -Watch for Special Sales!

III I -

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<<

When You Want Something Really
Tasty Somthing Cooked RIGHT
Drop In at the
Pilgrim Shop
Our Specialties:

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a

MAJESTIC

1

0
mom

THEY LAUGHED TOGETHER..
HOPED TOGETHER...
WEPT TOGETHER!
Two men and a girl ..
then the world suddenly fill-
ed them with memories

TODAY AND
WEDNESDAY

-

Fresh Crisp Dough-
nuts, that melt in your
mouth . . . 2 for 5c
Fancy Iced Doughnuts
. . .. . . 3for 10c

The best coffee in town
correctly made . . 5c
Waffles smothered in
syrup and melted but-
ter. Best you have ever
tasted . . . . . . . 20c

so poignant they

could

Booths .

. . . Tables

533 East Liberty Street

II'

U

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IIf

law

I

not forget I
SAMUEL GOLDWYN
presents
F IRE D A EC
MARCH
M E R L E
Em EB N
M E R B E R T
MARnSHAILL

IF YOU are looking for a place of refinement
PREKETE'S is your solution. Our really dif-
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