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November 26, 1935 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-11-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY

'NOVEMBE~

'38 To Elect
Class Officers
This Afternoon
John Townsend To Oppose
Stark Ritchie In Two
Party Fight
(Continued from Page 1)
pendent Party and the Union Party"
of last year. The candidates are as
follows:
President, Fletcher Platt; vice-pres-
ident, John Young; secretary, Rich-
ard Wangelin; treasurer, Carl Clem-
ent; and Honor Council representa-
tive, Goff Smith.
Identification cards must be pre-
sented at all elections today.
Paul Brown was chosen president
of the senior architecture college class
in non-partisan elections held yes-
terday afternoon. Brown, with 11
votes, outclassed Robert Morris and
Dale Hillier, who polled four and
three votes, respectively. The vote
for vice-presidency was: Dorothy
Roth 11, Paul Gorman 5, and Richard
Stickney 2. Dorothy Cowles defeated
Lillian Scott for secretary,t12 to 5,
and Leo Ruthenberg won the office
of treasurer from Charles Stocking,
14 to 4.
Emerson Powrie was chosen pres-
ident of the senior class of the School'
of Education at the recent election.
Dorothy Hart was elected vice-pres-
ident, John W. English was selected
for secretary, and Keith Loree was
made treasurer.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
the discussion will be Dr. J. W. Stan-
ton and the topic "Confucianism in
China." All interested are welcome.
Christian Science Organization:
There will be a meeting of this or-
ganization tonight at eight o'clock in
the Chapel, League Building. Stu-
dents, alumni, and faculty members
are cordially invited to attend.
Hillel Foundation: Dr. Hootkins'
class in Jewish Ethics will meet at the
Foundation on Tuesday evening at
8 o'clock. All interested are welcome.
Hillel Players Tryouts: Tryouts
for one-act plays are to be held at
the Hillel Foundation from 4 to 6.
These tryouts are not limited to
members.
Advanced Fencer's Group meets at
5:00 in the basement of Barbour Gym.
This group includes anyone who has
had one semester of instruction in
fencing on this Campus or in other
colleges.
Sigma Delta Chi will hold a lun-
cheon business meeting at 12:15 in
the Union. Members are urged to
attend.
Soccer Players: Any foreign or
American students wishing to play in
the All-Campus Soccer Finals Sat-
urday, Nov. 31, should report for
practice at the Intramural Building
today at 4:15 p.m.
The Bibliophiles of the University
Faculty Wives Club meets at 2:30 p.m.
at the home of Mrs. Donald Murphy,
1102 Forest.Ave. Prof. C. P. Merlino
will speak on Perandello.
Michigan Dames Homemaking
Group meets at 8p.m. at the home of
Mrs. C. H. Beukema, 1927 Dexter
'Ave.
Members with cars and those wish-
ing transportation are asked to meet

in the Michigan League lobby at 7:50
p.m. Wives of all students and in-
ternes are invited to attend this meet-
ing.
Coming Events
Luncheon for Graduate Students on
Wednesday, Nov. 27, at 12:00 in the
Russian Tea Room of the Michigan
League Building. Dr. Lawrence
Preuss, Assistant Professor of Politi-
cal Science, will speak informally on
"League Sanctions."
Quadrangle Club. The meeting
announced for Nov. 27 has been post-
poned one week, to Dec. 4. Speakers
will be as announced.
Roger Wililams Guild: Thanksgiv-
ing dinner on Thursday at 12:30. Call
7332 for reservations before Wednes-
day noon.
"La Maternelle" will be presented
by the Art Cinema League, Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday. Nov. 26-
27-28 in the Lydia Mendelssohn The-
atre at 8:15 p.m. The picture deals
with the street gamins of Paris and
has been acclaimed by cinema critics,
both here and abroad, as being one
of the finest films produced anywhere
in the world since the beginning of
sound. The picture has superimposed
English titles.

Beaten By Student

Hillel Starts
CampaignFor
New Members
Annual Drive Directed By
Shirell Kasle, President
Of Hillel Council
The Hillel Foundation is now con-
ducting its annual membership cam-
paign under the direction of Shirell
Kasle, '37, president of the Hillel
Council.
The Michigan Foundation is one of
the 32 chapters sponsored by the Bnai
Brith organization of America. Each
year this national organization sets
up a new Foundation on various cam-
puses of American universities and
colleges.
In the opinion of Dr. Bernard Hel-
ler, Hillel director, Michigan pos-
sesses one of the most beautiful Foun-
dations in the country and its ex-
tensive facilities are always open to
any desiring to use them, he said.
The various services sponsored by
the Foundation as explained by Kasle
include religious instruction, social
events, athletics, dramatics, debat-
ing, and as often as possible noted
national speakers are brought to this
campus. The religious aspects are
conducted by the director while the
other events are under student guid-
ance, it was explained.
In an effort to secure greater par-
ticipation of students in Hillel ac-
tivities than in the past the drive
will aim for 100 percent membership
of Jewish students on the campus,
Kasle emphasized.

~i.--

-Associated Press 2hoto
Bennett Y. Ryan, Harvard Junior,
faced a jail sentence following his
conviction for the brutal beating of
Frank Foster (left) during a foot-
ball celebration.

,Ann Arbor Laundries' Invitation
to try their new student bundle
THE ANN ARBOR LAUNDRIES cordially invite you to try their
new Student Bundle at these ridiculously low prices. There
is really no reason for you to continue sending your laundry home
when you are actually spending more for delivery charges alone
than it costs to have your laundry completely washed and de-
livered in Ann Arbor.

Considerable Damage Left By
Rooters, Says Grounds keeper

South Goal Posts Removed
With Aid Of Hack Saw
And Sledgehammers
By CLINTON B. CONGER
The wave of frenzied rooters that
followed the "Scarlet Scourge" onto
the Stadium field at the conclusion
of the game Saturday left behind it
extensive damage when it rolled back,
the report of Lorenzo Thomas, chief
groundskeeper, showed yesterday.
Of principle interest is the damage
suffered by the goal posts torn down
by the Ohio rooters after the game.
The posts at the south end of the
field, where the attack was success-
ful, were overthrown with the aid of
hack-saws and sledgehammers pro-
ducedby the invaders, abetted by a
rope cut from the flagpole and f as-
tened to the top of one post.
One of the uprights was broken
off at the ground, Thomas revealed,
while the other was severed at the
crossbar and bent over.
Much other destruction was
wrought by the Ohio fans, the
groundskeeper added, with the result
that of the 38-yard-line markers,
only four remained intact. Many
of the folding chairs in the box seat
section along the field were also de-
stroyed.
Henry Hatch, in charge of the
equipment room in Yost Field House,
reported that two of the four red
flags used to mark the corners of the
field were seized by the mob from
the managers who sought to defend
them by pulling them up at the mo-
ment the game ended.
Ohio rooters were not the only ones
to carry off trophies, it appears,
for in the melee after the game the
official who was struck by a centered
ball when he walked through the
Michigan backfield in the course of a
play lost his hat and whistle.
The goal posts are set in more than
four feet of concrete, and the new
south pair will be similarly con-
structed when the posts are replaced
next summer, the groundskeeper said.
BRUMM IN SOUTH HAVEN
Prof. John L. Brumm of the de-
partment of journalism will address
the Federated Women's Club of
South Haven today. His topic will
'be "Life and Art."

The flagpole at the south end of
the Stadium, made o steel tubing
and impedded in eight feet of con-
crete, was also engandered through
efforts to snap the top by whipping
it in the wind with the rope, until a
defender ran out and severed the rope
with a 'knife. The rope was then
transferred by the attacking forces to
the goal post offensive.
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