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November 24, 1935 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-11-24

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1935

IN THE WORLD OF BOOKS

Thrilling Grain Race' Depicted
In Story Of Blood And Thunder

'he Dappled Sunshine
MorrowOfH.--Charm'...

VICTORIOUS TROY OR THE HUR-
RYING ANGEL. John Masefield.
Macmillan, $2.50.

As o(1ntea PressP hoto
JOHN MASEFIELD

two above an Alger hero. He is an
engaging young person, ambitious,
courageous, properly modest, but very
little more than that. Masefield
never looks at the character from
the inside, and working from the
outside his analysis is mechanical
and only skin-deep. The same ap-
plies to the other characters. In
incident, both Cooper and Marry
surpass Masefield as seen in this
novel. There is little real narration
in the cyclone section of the book,
and when later the hero works the
ship to port, the directnarration is
cut short in favor of letters and
newspapers accounts as narrative de-
vices.
In general, the book indicates not
only the author's waning powers, but
the fact that he is definitely out-
moded. Masefield writes a story of
the year 1922, but produces a book
whose type and outlook on life are
representative of the nineteenth
rather than of the twentieth century.
For him there has been no Great
War, no shifting of values. Life at
sea is hard but good, and the only
tragedy is the romantic one of the
passing of the age of sails - the sup-
planting of the beautiful white-
winged clipper ships by the iron-

DWIGHT MORROW. By Harold Nic-
olson. New York: Harcourt, Brace.
$3.75.
By WILBERT L. HINDMAN
(Of the Political Science Dept.)
Dwight Morrow was the kind of
man most Republicans would like to
be and few Republicans are: a true
Liberal, with deep-seated economic
conservatism. The book is largely
devoted to an explanation of how it
was possible for such a synthesis
to be achieved and maintained by
a man of action.
As a consequence of this interpre-
tation of Morrow's life, the author is
led to the enthusiastic extreme of
contending that "in the varied and
rapid expansion of his career, he de-
veloped a new type of civilized mind."
Consequently the events in Morrow's
career - at Amherst, as a corpora-
tion lawyer, as a partner in the house
of Morgan, in Europe with the Al-
lied Maritime Transport Council, and
in Mexico - merely serve to illustrate
the sharp-cut facets of his personal-
ity. And the negative side of his
life, the things he refused, or
missed, such as the Presidency of
Yale, the position of Agent General
of Reparation, a place in Hoover's
Cabinet - serves to silhouette Mor-
row's complete integrity more vividly.
Not every man has been able to
maintain the mental perspicuity
which Morrow demonstrated when
faced with the necessities of action.
Lincoln Steffens observed that the
man of action usually thinks for as
long as circumstances will permit,
and then shuts the gates of his
thought and acts upon the opinion he
has thus far formulated. Morrow
never acted until he was sure of his
position; he attained that security
of accurate wisdom by exhaustive
preliminary research in the Brandei-
sian manner. Early in his career, his
investigation of penal problem sin'
connection with his work on a New
Jersey commission on prison reform
made the report of thatibody unus-
ually able and authoritative. At the
London Naval Conference, many years
later, he obtained a position of lead-
ership because he was the only ci-
vilian delegate who had taken the
trouble to master the technical in-
hooved monsters of steam and steel.
The questioning winds of modernism
have not blown over him or his
heroes. Dick Pomfret receives his.
Mate's Certificate and a cheque for
fifty guineas as a reward for heroism.
"Golly, my Dinkie," he writes to his
sister, "we are going absolutely
halves in this . . .We'll have such a
holiday as never was." He is Mid-
shipman Easy refined for boys and+
old ladies. And the owners give a+
dinner to the ship's crew at which
there are speeches, songs, and a play-
let by the sailors, and everybody is
happy and loyal to the owners and
to the traditions of the British Mer-
chant Marine (although seven lives
have been lost through the drunken+
inefficiency of a Captain who makes
a speech at the dinner and is hon-
ored with a permanent shore job
by the owners). There are passages
of beautiful writing in Victorious
Ticy, and for those who wish it there
is much information concerning
sailing ships and their handling, but
it is by no means an important book.

upon the historical approach, devel-
oped at Amherst and applied to every
subsequent phase of his life, which
made his actions so forceful and wise,
there was another quality involved
in his success, which Nicolson has not
been able wholly to capture. This
quality was "the dappled sunshine
of his charm," without which many
of Morrow's activities would have
been fruitless.
One element of this personal at-
tractiveness depended upon his atti-
tude in controversy: he was always
willing to believe the opposition cor-
rect until proven wrong by a careful
examination of the fact. Conse-
quently he understood the opposition
viewpoint thoroughly, which enabled
him to discover workable compro-
mises. Again, he had a quick humor
which played a prominent part in
easing his associations. There was,
for example, the statement he made
to M. Briand admitting his lack of
command of French: "Bon accent,"
he said, "pas de vocabulaire."
Morrow's sincere preoccupation1
with ideas made him come very close
to standing as the verifying excep-
tion to Bagehot's statement of a fact
so apparent that it is often obscure,
"There is one thing which no one
will permit to be treated lightly,-
himself." Morrow was what Nicolson
terms "that most rare of all phe-
nomena - the ambitious but uncom-
petitive man ... "For him, the world
was divided into the people who do
things and the people who get the
credit. He aspired to belong in the
first category.
Morrow's personality, backed by
the intrinsic worth of his ideas, won
him great popular support in New
Jersey when he ran for the Senate.

Had he lived, it is possible that he
would today be providing a solution
for the problem the Republicans will
have to face next summer and which
is already causing them uneasy
nights.
Essentially, Morrow 'was "a man
of action predominantly interested in
ideas." This combination represented
in Mr. Nicolson's devoted estimation
" ... the completely civilized mind."
Whether or not this is true, the book
succeeds in making clear that Dwight
Morrow, had he lived to achieve the
potentialities of his statesmanship,
might have epitomized a situation
anticipated centuries ago - an oc-
casion when "political greatness and
wisdom meet in one . .. "
This book is a superior product of
;he retired-diplomat school of writers.
It is unfortunate that Mr. Nicolson
was not able to analyze more satis-
factorily the essential nature of Mor-
row's personality, which served to
make his wisdom workable by win-
ning the approval and cooperation of
others. But the delineation of the
broad features of Morrow's nature
gives the work an unusual fascina-
tion. It is indeed regrettable that
Morrow's career was prematurely
ended, since the abrupt termination
of his political development probably
precluded a comprehensive biogra-
phical consideration of his remark-
able individuality.
Nathalia Crane, the child prodigy,1
is about to come before the public!
again. Now, grown up and twenty-
two, she emerges with a book of verse,
Swear By The Night.

SPURGEON
Does A Lot Of Research
Among Elizabethan
Dramatists
SHAKESPEARE'S IMAGERY. Car-
oline F. E.- Spurgeon. Macmillan
By JOHN SELBY
One of the most shrewd and help-
ful pieces of literary detective work
in years comes wrapped betw en the
boards of Caroline F. E. Spur on's
Shakespeare's Imagery.
She has extracted and classified
every image in Shakespeare. She
has determined which field of ex-
perience each fits, and has used her
findings to determine things about
the great poet which (some of them)
cannot be determined otherwise.
Then she has established bases for
comparison with five other Eliza-
bethan dramatists by analyzing five
works of each of them, and compar-
ing these with five from Shakespeare.
The ones chosen are Marlowe, Ben
Jonson, Chapman, Dekker and Mas-
singer. For a special inquiry into the
authorship of Shakespeare's plays,
she subjects the work of Francis
Bacon to the same treatment..
The method turns up very inter-
esting material on the five dramatists
mentioned, particularly on Marlowe.
But chiefly the study is bent on
Shakespeare, and no reader of Shake-
speare could, it would seem, fail to
find Miss Spurgeon's research signifi-
cant.

DWIGHT MORROW

ENGINEERS' and ARCHITECTS' MATERIAL
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tricacies of the problem of allocating
naval tonnage.
These thorough studies of the
problems he was concerned with gave
Morrow the sound wisdom that is fre-
quently miscalled vision. At the end
of the war, after writing a series of
articles later compiled in book form
under the title "The Society of Free
States," wherein he examined with
reasonable thoughtfulness the his-
toric proposals for international or-
ganization from the time of Emeric
Cruce, he was able to recognize and
contend that the League of Nations
Secretariat was of more immediate
importance than either the Council
or the Assembly.
In the diplomatic field, Morrow rec-
ognized what he had learned to be
true in his earlier experience with the
law: that a good contract is one
wherein both parties have the will or
desire to fulfill the obligations. Thus
in the international field he dis-
tinguished "working agreements"
from "agreemerits" on the basis of the
desire of the parties concerned to en-
enforce the agreement, and not the
basis of sanctions.
It is evident that the statement of
historical and factual features of
Morrow's method is presented with
perceptual implications. But that
would seem to be a point in its favor,
considering the imminence of another
of our quadrennial forensic typhoons.
Although it was Morrow's -reliance

I

Tomorrow Night at 8:15
THE ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION
presents
HARRY L. HOPmKINS
Federal Emergency Relief Administrator and
Head of the Works Progress Administration
speaking on
"ProblemsofGovern ent"

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