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November 24, 1935 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-11-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T HE MJC IIG A-N DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1935

Minnesota
Gophers, After -
Bad Start, Ride
To 33 -7 Win
Viking Powerhouse Gains
Tie For Conference Title
_____ I~t is
In Traditional Struggle wil1 apj
and th
MINNEAPOLIS, Nov. 23.-('P)- man. I
Minnesota uncorked the fury of its those ci

Wears Down Wisconsin; Notre Dame Beats U.S.C.

-I1

Makes Last Appearance As Wolverine

The HOT
STOVE
By BILL REED

___ _
..

I

4

unbeaten gridiron machine today to
flatten Wisconsin 33 to 7 for a share
of the Western Conference title and
clinch national recognition for the
second consecutive year.
George Roscoe's brilliant work with
the running of Minnesota's touch-
down twins, Rudy Dmitro and Andy
Uram, coupled with the plunging of
Sheldon Beise, stretched to 24 games
the Golden Gophers' three-year rec-
ord without defeat.
Held to even terms by the Badgers'
heavier line in the first half, the
Gopher attack began to function in
the second, ending with Dmitro's 80-
yard dashfor the last touchdown 5
minutes before the closing gun.
Purdue Upset By
Fighting Hoosiers
BLOOMINGTON, Ind., Nov. 23. -
(P)-Indiana University's "fighting
Hoosiers," scoring on a 53-yard aer-
ial thrust, late in the third period,
whipped Purdue 7 to 0 in their annual
football battle today.
Vernon Huffman, 190-pound quar-
terback, hauled in an 18-yard pass
from Wendel Walker, fought off
three Purdue defenders, and sprint-
ed 42 yards down the sidelines to
score.
Kelley's Run Gives
Yale 14-7 Triumph
CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Nov. 23. - (P)
- A gallant Harvard team took its
eyes off Larry Kelley for a second
today and that loquacious thorn in
the Crimson side started Yale to its
14 to 7 triumph by snagging a pass
and racing 35 yards to score.
The crowd of 47,000 that braved
a spitting snowstorm to witness the
54th renewal of this ancient rivalry,
was thrilled by the courageous battle
the underdog Crimsonites put up
duringthe scoreless first half and
then amazed when they tied the score
early in the fourth period.
Chicago Ekes Out
7-6 Win Over Illini
CHAMPAIGN, Ill., Nov. 23. - (P)-
On the same field where Red Grange
first galloped to fame ten years ago,
Capt. Jay Berwanger of the Univer-
sity of Chicago climaxed his amazing
football career today with a personal
victory over Illinois in the final foot-
ball game of the season. The score
was 7 to 6.
It was Berwanger's own triumph.
Catching a punt about midfield late
in the third period, Berwanger, the
mighty son of a Dubuque, Ia., black-
smith, fought his way through the
entire Illinois team on a gallop of 49
yards before he was brought down
from behind a yard from the Illinois
goal.
After nobody else could carry the
ball over, Berwanger, with one titanic
drive, plunged over the middle of the
Illinois line for the touchdown. A
few seconds later his gifted toe booted
the ball squarely between the up-
rights from placement for the extra
point that gave Chicago its victory.
Team Spikes Bierman's
Slogan By Beating Tulane
Coach Bernie Bierman, for three
years at Minnesota, frequently used
the expression, "Now when I was at
Tulane-" but it won't be effective
any more. His Gopher gridmen met
and conquered Tulane, 20-0, and they
are convinced Tulane can be left out
of the conversation from now on.
WHAT A GAME!

It may not be a record, but George
Washington threw 50 passes-almost
one a minute-against Rice Institute,
completed 18 for 250 yards and was
beaten, 41 to 0.

partiali
this is 1
the gut
which y
the gro
players,
which c
which k
so that
Wolveri
down, o
Parti
portune
spirit o
spiratio
followin
as a lea
ner.

unfortunate that this column
pear in a student newspaper,
at the writer is a Michigan
t is unfortunate because under
ircumstances no degree of im-
ty can be maintained, and yet
the ideal time to comment on
s of a Michigan football team
yesterday was literally run into
ound by a squad of superior
for it was a Michigan team
ame back asking for more and
kept pushing its own offense
even as the game ended the
nes were registering a first
ne of their five of the day.
cularly would this be an op-
moment to comment on the
f one individual, whose in-
n the Michigan team has been
ng throughout what now ends
n season - Captain Bill Ren-

If it were possible to picture
Renner in yesterday's football
game without coloring the de-
scription with prejudice, there
would be the story of the Mich-
igan quarterback who threw 16
forward passes without great
protection, and completed seven
for four first downs; and of the
kicker whose punts averaged 38
yards per try; and more than all
else, of a defensive back whose
tackling was the surest on the
field and who personally stopped
or contributed to stopping fully
75% of all Ohio plays which
passed the line of scrimmage.
But it is of course impossible to
describe Renner yesterday in such
a colorless fashion. It would be nec-
essary to tell of the background of
the 159-pound back who will live
with the immortals of Michigan
football.
And that is to recall the beginning
of the current season, when it became
apparent that the only difference be-
tween 1935 and 1934 as far as Michi-
gan football was concerned was Bill
Renner. For Bill Renner was the
best passer in Michigan's history,
and for that reason one of the prin-
ciple offensive threats in the Big Ten.
But Renner, although he had
proved his offensive power with
the 1933 National Champions,
was notoriously fragile, he would
never be abel to play a full game.
And so it was concluded that
this key to the Michigan offense
could be used only in a relief role.
Then came a gradual awakening.
After three weeks of preseason prac-
tice it was evident that there was not
a harder worker on the squad than
the "glass" Renner, that no one was
running, blocking or tackling harder
than the same.
So it was that Renner became a
starting back, and became the "iron
man" of the Michigan team, getting
but rare relief, despite the fact that
his physique, hardly adaptable to col-
legiate football in the first place, was
taking a pounding such as no other
man was receiving because of his key
position.
As a 60-minute ball player, Ren-
ner's presence was not justified simp-
ly because he was the team's offense.
For after a short time it became evi-
dent where the brains of the squad
were centered, about the cool football
mind of Renner. And then, after a
few weeks of observation, it was em-
phasized that the most valuable de-
fensive back on the squad was also
Renner.
All this in the person of a fel-
low whose only natural ability
was uncanny accuracy in passing,
but who, by constant application
and the most fundamental of all
attributes - real spirit, made
himself a worthy successor in a
line of great Michigan quarter-
backs.
So it as yesterday that this self-
made football player, with everything
against him as regards physical qual-
ifications, ended his playing career
in a supreme effort against over-
whelming odds. But the spirit which
made him and the 1935 Michigan
team, even in defeat, will not be for-
gotten.
WANT HOCKEY MANAGERS
All tryouts for sophomore hockey
managersashould report at 6 p.m.
Monday, at the Coliseum.

Capt. Bill Renner, probably one of the most outstanding passers
in Michigan gridiron history, ended a brilliant career in the Michigan
Stadium yesterday. Renner's presence in the Wolverine lineup this
season has been cited by observers as the outstanding reason for the
improvement over last year's showing. It was Renner's play this fall
that led directly to early season victories, especially the one over Wis-
consin when he threw three touchdown passes. In his last two games
he also did a good job of punting.
Could The Scurrilous Scourge
Beat Bierman's Blocking Fools?
z"3

Trojans Yield
To Irish Rally
In Second Half
Layden Eleven Scores In
Third And Last Periods
To Take 20-13 Decision
SOUTH BEND, Ind., Nov. 23.-('P)
- They were "Fighting Irish" to the
last exciting split second.
Fifty thousand spectators, half
frozen by the blasts of a wintry No-
vember afternoon, but glowing in ad-
miration for one of the grandest
squads of fighting men ever to wear
the gold and miue, watched Notre
Dame end its greatest season since
the Rockne era today with a typical'
comeback that defeated Southern
California 20 to 13.
The victory marked the first time
Notre Dame has ever defeated the
Trojans at Notre Dame. Also, it kept
Notre Dame within the ranks of the
possible eastern Rose Bowl candi-
dates despite one defeat and one tie
in its record.
Yearling Track
eeting To Be
HeldTuesday
Coach Doherty announces a meet-
ing of the entire freshman track
squad to be held at 4:20 Tuesday,
Nov. 26, in the locker rooms on the
second floor of Yost Field House. He
will informally relate the past records
of Michigan track teams and will out-
line the year's work as set aside for
the freshman squad.
Doherty stated that ,although the
freshmen have no direct competition,
telegraphic meets will be held at fre-
quent intervals throughout the win-
ter and spring terms. Meets are ar-
ranged with the freshman teams of
other colleges. On the date set the
events are run off at the respective
schools, and the results are tabulated
and transmitted to the other college.
Thus, the places are awarded accord-
ing to the times of the runner. Time
trials with the Varsity take place both
indoors and outside.
Following Ken Doherty, Coach
Hoyt and Captain Frank Aikens will
say a few words of encouragement to
the track aspirants. Doherty ex-
pressed the keen desire that all fresh-
men who are interested in track or
who think that they might possess
such ability will be present. More
than sixty men are expected for this
turnout. It is hoped that more high
jumpers will try out. So far Bob
Gager has jumped the highest. His
present mark is five feet five. In the
past Michigan has always had a group
of jumpers who have placed well in
college competition, but to carry out
this tradition new material must be
found.
Marquette 'U' Fullback
Is A Lover Of 10 Sports
The middle name of Ward Cuff,
Marquette University's brilliant full-
back, is Floyd, but it should be Ver-
satility. Ask this perfectly-built
twenty-two-year-old husky which
sport he likes best and he will name
basketball, football, track, baseball,
swimming, hockey, soccer, tennis,
bowling and poker, and then say,
"One's the same as the other; I like
them all."

By rushing .... ..12
By passing ......73

295
152

85

4

5 20
Yards gained from s-rimmage

Passes .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Attempted .......16
Completed ........ 7
Yards Lo-t by Penalties
.. 5
Punts ..............12
Average yardage . .38
Return of punts, average
yardage ........ 3
Fumbles ............ 3
Own fumbles
recovered .......0
Opponents fumbles
recovered .......2
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
Michigan Carried
ball

TEAM STATIST7CS
First Downs Mrch.
By rushing ....... 0
By passing....... 4
Through penalties . . 1

447
26
10
35
4
36'%1
16
2
0
3
Ave.
gain

O.S.U.
16
4
0

Statistics

Renner.

..1

Campbell...........5
Remias ............ 3
Everhardus........11
Ellis...............1
Barclay ............ 1
Ritchie............3
Ohio State
Pincura ............ 5
Heekin ............10
Boucher ...........18
McDonald .........10
lBettridge........... 7
Dye...............2
Williams ........... 4
Rees .............. 2
Kabealo ............ 4
Fisch .............. 1
Beltz..............1
Miller.............1

-.2
2
2
- 12
1
-1.3

Briggs Takes
Over Reins Of
Detroit Tigers
MIAMI BEACH, Fla., Nov. 23.- (P)
- The presidency of the world cham-
pion Detroit Tigers was assumed to-
day by Walter O. Briggs, industrialist
and for 15 years silent partner of
the late Frank J. Navin in the Amer-
ican League baseball club.
Mickey Cochrane, catcher and
manager, who steered the Tigers to
two straight American League pen-
nants and the 1935 championship,
was continued in his post and also
was named vice-president of the club.
The announcement of the Tigers'
management came out of Briggs' lux-
urious winter estate here after he had
conferred with Cochrane and other
club officials for five hours.
The sale, purchase, trade or re-
lease of players - everything in the
playing department - will be in
Cochrane's hands.
OF COURSE,
A VISIT IN PERSON
Would be better but the next best
hing is to send your photograph as
1, Christmas gift - and one made in
our own home is the most intimate-
y personal sort of a picture.
G. R. SWA IN
PHOTOGRAPHER
Phone 2-1924 713 East University

5
7.3
4
3.5
3.3
8.5
3
5.5
2.2
-8
18
0

By FRED BUESSER
The scurrilous scourge has come,
scourged and gone, long live the
scourge!
The real battle, however, has just
begun and ardent supporters of both
the Minnesota Gophers and the Ohio
State Buckeyes will continue to argue
over the relative merits of their teams
long after the actual details of play
have left their minds.
Tied For Crown
The Gophers and the Bucks now
hold the Conference Crown between
them, both have vanquished all their
Big Ten foes, and both have scored
six touchdowns against Michigan.
A post season game between them
is out of the question but assuming
that it were played, what would be the
result!
First, it would be an offensive battle
- offenses of two widely different
types. Ohio State ,depends upon
an intricate and varied offense, which
is calculated to bewilder the defen-
sive team. Tricky shifts and for-
mations designed to catch the de-
fense out of position play a large part
in their attack.
Are All Blockers
Minnesota's offense is built around
a team of eleven blockers who gripe
only because one of them has to carry
the ball. It is a blocking unit, and
it has backs who can really run. It
is not a deceptive offense, but it is
a perfectly planned and executed one.
The solution to the question seems
to lie in the fact that it is possible
to solve an intricate offense, but it is
impossible to stop a runner when
you're on your back.
An Ohio State-Minnesota game
would resolve itself into a wide-open
offensive battle that would bring guts
into play. And here Minnesota would
triumph. Ohio State has definitely
proven itself a quitting ball club when
it is backed up against its own goal
post, and the Gophers are the gentle-
men who would keep Buckeyes pick-
ing slivers out of their pants all
afternoon. The hard-charging Min-
nesota line would play havoc with thej
Buckeye laterals and the Minnesota
ends and tackles are down under
punts with a remarkable alacrity.
Dye and Williams are undoubtedly
great runners but both have been very

effectively bottled up by teams whose
forward line could move fast.
Possesses Power
Minnesota has walked over its op-
position with a display of real power.
Ohio State has played a weaker
schedule and lost its one really tough
game. It lost it not because it was
beaten but because it quit when an
apparently beaten Notre Dame team
rallied in the last quarter. Quit just
as Michigan did not quit today even
when Ohio was gaining first down
after first down with a feeble pass
attack which crossed up the Wol-
verine secondary.
Michigan didn't have the team to do
it yesterday, but let Bierman's block-
ing fools at 'em, and the Scarlet
Scourge would be reduced to an ordi-
nary ball club. Against a weak team
they look great, have looked great
all season, but let them run up against
an inspired team such as Illinois was
a week ago, or against a team which
has the fundamentals of the game
down as well as Minnesota has, and
the invincible juggernaut which spent
the last four minutes of the Michigan
game with their whole first team on
the field trying to beat the Minnesota
score, and the world would see just
how much Ohio deserves a half share
of the Conference crown.
PRINCETON STILL UNBEATEN
PRINCETON, N. J., Nov. 23.- (/')
-Trapped between two teriffic
storms, Dartmouth's hitherto un-
beaten Indians were swept off their
feet in a blizzard of snow today and
then blasted by a barrage of Prince-
ton touchdowns that carried the
Tigers to the top of the eastern foot-
ball heap, 26-6.

IOWA 0; NORTHWESTERN 0.
EVANSTON, Ill., Nov. 23. -(P) -
Neither Iowa's wraith-like negro, Oze
Simmons, nor Northwestern's plat-
inum blonde, Don Heap, nor anyone
else for that matter, could shake loose
today and the Hawkeyes and Wildcats
fought to a scoreless draw today in
a stirring Western Conference foot-
ball final.
SELL INFIELDER
Sale of Bobby Doerr and George
Myatt, infielder of the Hollywood
Baseball Club of the Pacific Coast
League, to the Boston Braves for
1937 delivery was revealed today.
Freem-ian
Fine Shoes
FOR MEN
$4.00 - $5.00 - $6.00

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