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November 21, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-11-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE1 MEVIH21AN 1CIEY

THUSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1935

Rubber Lands
Described By
Prof. athews
Origin Of Borneo Industry
Is Subject Of University
Radio Lecture
The beginning of the large rubber
plantations in Borneo and other parts
of the Middle East began when a
British explorer, Henry Wickham,
smuggled some 70,000 rubber seeds
out of Brazil, and took them to Lon-
don where they were planted was
one of the descriptions given by Prof.
Donald M. Mathews, of the forestry
school, in a talk over the University
radio station yesterday.
From these seedlings, Professor
Mathews declared, a little less than
2,000 seedlings were raised, which
were shipped to Ceylon and planted
there. From the seed of the resulting
trees, "the six and a half million
acres of rubber plantations of the
Middle East have developed." Since
this industry developed so quickly,
the industry soon used up the old tea,
coffee, and coconut plantations on
which rubber trees were first planted,
and a great demand for new areas of
wild jungle land was created, he
added.
Surveyed Borneo
Since the best land for rubber
plantations was the land which was
best for forests, Professor Mathews
was surveying the unexplored, unfa-
miliar parts of Borneo. "The commer-
cial exploration of a tropical forest
area is an interesting job but one
which neverthelesstinvolvesbmuch
hard work," he pointed out. "The
natural forest cover is so dense that
no idea can be obtained of the stand-
ing timber or of the soil conditions
existing beneath the main tree can-
opy, without penetrating the jungle
on foot. Airplane surveys would tell
one little about the area except that
it was covered with forests, and this,
in a country like Borneo, one can be
pretty sure of without getting into the
air to find out."
Jungle Very Dense
"The jungle is so dense," Professor
M hews emphasized, "and so full of
climbing vines and rattan that a path
has to be .cut with a knife for every
step that one moves. On the aver-
age a line two miles long could not
be covered in under 6 to 8 hours, and
often the vegetation is so dense that
one can look back over the line he
has covered down a green and leafy
tunnel, seeing nothing of the country
on either side."
Professor Mathews also attempted
to correct the common misconcep-
tions of the tropics. The climate of
the lowerelevations of the tropics,
within a few hundred miles of the
seacoast is in reality the only tem-
perate climate in the world, he said.
In the so-called "temperate" zone, we
have an annual range of temperature
of 100 to 150 degrees; in the tropics
at sea-level the average maxima

Ethiopian Traitor Leads Italians Into Makale

-Associated Press Photo.
This picture transmitted by radio from London to New York shows
Ras Gugsa (center on gray horse), famous Ethiopian traitor and
former son-in-law of Emperor Haile Selassie, leading native troops into
Makale in advance of regular Italian armies, when 11 Duce's troops
took possession of the city.

Haber To Talk
At Convention
Of Accountants'
Meetings Will Open Here
Tomorrow; Bloug h Ani
AltmeyerToSpeak
(Continued from Page 1)
-I-

ro
re
ac
isi
lo
pr
of
p,
Tb
Pri
by
thi
a
as
Pa
h
of
in
sta
at
he,

pe." George D. Bailey of Detroit,
sident partner of Ernst and Ernst,
ecountants, will be toastmaster.
The conference will open with reg-
;ration at 9 a.m. in the Union, fol-
wing which William B. Isenberg,
esident of the Michigan Association
Certified Public Accountants, will
reside at a round table discussion.
he first topic to be discussed will be
Working Papers and Other Work
ocedure of the Accountant," lead
y M. B. Walsh of Detroit, head of
ie Walsh Institute for Accountants,
nd D. M. Russel, also of Detroit,
ssociated with the firm of Lybrand,
sss Brothers and Montgomery.
Prof. H. F. Taggart of the School of
Business Administration and R. E.
,yne of Lawrence Scudder and Co.,
fChicago, will then lead discussions
"Methods of Presenting Informa-
on in Financial Statements."
Edward J. Barr, treasurer of the
ate certified public accountant's as-
ciation, will preside at a luncheon
12:15 p.m. in the Union, which will
ear Dean Clarence S. Yoakum of
he Graduate School speak on "Prob-
ms of Allocation."
Wives of the accountants will be
ntertained at tea at 2 p.m. in the
eague. Music and entertainment
ill be provided members following
he dinner tomorrow night, accord-
g to Prof. Francis E. Ross of the
chool of Business Administration,
,ho is supervising arrangements for
Le conference.

Manager Of State I
Debating Matches
'Neighbor' Teams
William Halstead, of the speech de-
partment, and manager of the Michi-
gan High School Forensic Associa-
tion, is still puzzling over why a de-
bating team from the upper penin-
sula will travel more than 100 miles,
including a trip across the Straits of
Mackinac, to debate with the Chey-
bogen High School Debating team.
Mr. Halstead, who is new at the job
of managing the Association, under-
stood that the custom is to bring to-
gether teams in nearby towns, and
that was just what he planned to do.
But Cheybogan's coach, Carl Titus,
had never heard of Inwood before, so
he set out to find the spot indicated
on the map. It proved to be a "ghost
town," sans school or any other build-
ing.
Mr. Halstead investigated, and
found, too late, that the town of In-
wood which was registered in the As-
sociation, is in Schoolcraft County, in
the upper peninsula. And that is'
why, on Friday night, two teams from
the extreme ends of the state will
meet for the first time in the history
of the Association, in a preliminary
debate.
Metropolitan Cliub
Will Meet Friday
The meeting of the Metropolitan
Club will be held at 7:30 p.m. Friday
il~tl cVt f Th d11rcr.Tv d t nr aViniy

Cox Is Elected
J-Hop Chairman'
As State Wins
Oyler Wins Presidency In
Literary College But His
Party Loses 3 Posts
(Continued from Page 1)
throp, James Briegel, and Marion
Holden were out in front by small
margins, but the State Street hege-
mony was cracked by the victories of
two Washtenaw candidates- Jean
Greenwald and Mary Potter - who
ran ahead of their tickets.
The United Engineers' candidate
for president, Miller Sherwood, Sigma
Phi, defeated George Malone, inde-
pendent Consolidated, by a vote of
101 to 75, as his fellow nominees
took the remaining three posts of
primary importance. Cedric Sweet
defeated Allen Upson for vice-presi-
dent by the top-heavy count of 123
to 55; William Sheehan downed Mel-
ville Hyatt for the secretarial post,
90 to 84; and Jack asley easily beat
Edward VanderVelde for treasurer,
115 to 61, to solidify the defeat of
the Consolidated Engineers.
Possibly the day's honors for pro-
viding the ultimate in hair-raisers
go to Burton Coffey, of the Uniteds,
who nosed out Jack Sinn of the Con-
solidateds for representative on the
Honor Council, 86 to 85. Francis
Wallace, 36, president of the Engi-
neering Council, told The Daily last
night that this vote, in particular,
had been "very carefully" checked.
William Lowell, of the Consolidated
Engineers, brightened his party's
horizon by winning the Engineering
Council post from Jack Cooper, 87
to 85. This vote as also checked,
Wallace said.
The Consolidated group further re-
deemed itself by snaring the two J-
Hop committeeman jobs. Donald
Hillier and Carl Abbott bested John
Freeze and Gus Collatz, the four poll-
ing 91, 82, 76, and 72 votes respec-
tively.
No opposition party appeared in the
business administration school elec-
tion yesterday, so the lone group com-
posed of Richard Prey, president;
Dale Campbell, vice-president; James
Scherr, secretary, G4e -
arer, and Bernard Carey, J-Hop Cofliw
mitteeman, were u c-
Sed.
The failure of architecture college
candidates to submit eligibility slips
to Dixon caused the postponement of
their election.
Voting machines secured from the
Automatic Voting Machine Corp.,
Jamestown, N. Y., were used in the
literary college elections. Dixon said
he was "eminently satisfied" with
them, and added that there was "no
possibility" of fraud in connection
with the balloting.
Faseists Combating
Leftists In Mexico

CLASSIFIED
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101;. discount if paid within ten days
Minimumnthree lines per insertion.
from the data of last insertion.
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The above rates are per reading line,
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Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
3c per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add 10c
per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7% point
type.

Classified Directory I

FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Man's new tan riding
boos. Size 9. Cost $11.50. Will
sell for $5. 503 E. Liberty.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Between Pretzel Bell and
corner of Ingalls and Huron, class
pin, letters B.M.H. $5 reward.
Phone 9597.
LOST: Grey Waterman pen on Fri-
day. About campus of West Huron.
Reward -Phone 3467. 115
GOLD RING, letter W, class of '34.
Initialed R.S.H. Reward. Phone
6226. Hadley. 114
NOTICES
STATIONERY: Printed with your
name and address. 100 sheets, 100
envelopes. $1.00. Many styles.
Craft Press, 305 Maynard. 9x
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

SET THANKSGIVING DATE
LANSING, Nov. 20. - ,/P' - Gov.
Fitzgerald proclaimed Thursday, Nov.
28, as a day of public thanksgiving.

LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. So.N darned.
Careful work at Iow price. Ix
FOR RENT
FOR RENT at very reasonable rate
completely furnished 5-room apart-
ment on first floor of duplex house
from Dec. 20 through April. Phone
7716. -118
FOR RENT: Garage, S. University
near Forest. Phone 5929. 117
U. S. Delegates
Are Named To
Navalarley
WASHINGTON, Nov. 20.- (/P) -
The Roosevelt administration's sur-
prise move in naming William Phil-
lips, undersecretary of state, as a
delegate to the London naval con-
ference opening Dec. 6 was interpret-
ed today as a sign the parley is con-
sidered of major importance.
Phillips, a career man with long
experience in international affairs,
will be a member of a delegation
headed by Norman H. Davis, "roving
ambassador." Admiral William H.
Standley, the navy's highest ranking
officer, was selected as another mem-
ber.
The first indication of the policy
to be upheld by the American dele-
gates was given last night by Presi-
dent Roosevelt. It is a policy of oppo-
iition to any increases of naval
strength beyond present limits.
The United States, Mr. Roosevelt
said, will oppose the building of navies
that cost nations more than they cost
today. Whether this meant that the
United States would oppose Japan's
long-standing desire for naval equal-
ity with the United States and Great,
Britain was not stated, though some
observers placed this construction on
the American position.

I Schaeberle Music House

203 East Liberty

Phone 6011

RAGGEDY ANN BEAUTY SHOP.,
Moved across the street to 1114
South University. Soft watei
shampoo and finger wave, 50c.
Special on all permanents. Strictly
sanitary. 8x
MAC'S TAXI - 4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
MOVIE THRILLER CLIMAX
RIVERSIDE, Calif., Nov. 20. - (WP)
- The Anaheim and Riverside high
school football teams played one of
those gridiron rarities, a high-score
tie. Riverside completed a 65-yard
pass in the last 40 seconds of play to
knot the score at 19 to 19.

To certain points on New York
Central System and to many
other destinations
5/6 ONE-WAY FARE
For the Round Trip
(Good only in Coaches)
Good going Wednesday, Nov.27 (3 a. m. and
after) and until 12 noon Thursday, Nov. 28.
Returning leave destination not late; than
Dec. 2.
11/3 FARE
FOR THE ROUND TRIP
(Good in Coaches or Pullmans)
Round Trip Pullman Fares Also Reduced
Generally good going on any train after 3a.m.
Wed., Nov. 27, until noon Sun., Dec. 1. Re-
turn leave destination not later than Dec 2.
CEN

Ready to supply you with all your Musical Wants: Instruments
for Band, Orchestra, and Home. First Class Instrument Repair
Department. We would like to count you among our many
satisfied customers.
BALDWIN PIANOS SCHILLER PIANO

S

v.

ARBOR SPRINGS WATER
has that exhiliarating Zest that it takes to
make each meal a delight.
-___ .ORDER A CASE TODAY ----
Delivered to your home In cazcs of six 2-qt. bottles, or in large 5-gal. bottles.
PHONE 8270 FOR QUICK SERVICE
ARBOR SPRINGS WATER CO.
416 West Huron Phone 8270

and minima are 0 and 75 degrees re- lei
spectively. Thus, Professor Mathews
added, as far as the absolute effect en
of temperature goes, that of the trop- Le
ics cannot be said to have any dele- wi
terious effects upon those resident th
there.
Pointing out that there is a com- Se
mon misconception with regard to the wi
tropics that rainfall is continuous th
throughout the year and heavy at all
times of the year, Professor Mathews
concluded, "The rainfall is between
22 to 4 times that of Michigan," but
the rainy season does not last any
more than our winter season lasts
here in the north.
Terrace Garden
Dancing Studio
Instructions I n a 11
forms. 'Classical. sociarl,
dancing. Ph. 9695.
wuerth Theatre Bldg.
LAST TIMES TODAY
"URDER IN THE FLEET"
and
"WITHOUT REGRET"
Friday - Saturday
CHESTER MORRIS
"PUBLIC HERO NO. 1"
GEO. O'BRIEN
"THUNDER MOUNTAIN"
Tarzan, No. 11
Daily 1:30 - 11 P.M.
WHITNEY
15c to 6P.M., 25c After 6
-NOW '
First Showing!
"CON FIDENTIAL"
DONALD COOK
EVELYN KNAPP
WARREN HYMER
And-
JOAN BLONDELL
GLENDA FARRELL

instead oi 1ursaay, as, previously
announced, Sanford Peyser, '37, said
yesterday.
The meeting will be held in the
Grand Rapids Room of the League.
The club was recently formed for
the purpose of securing mutual bene-
fits for University students from met-
ropolitan New York and northern
New Jersey.

,,

MEXICO CITY, Nov. 20. - (P) -
One man was slain and 46 persons
were wounded seriously in a pitched
fight between Fascist "gold shirts"
and leftists before the national pal-
ace today during Mexico's celebra-
tion of the 25th anniversary of the
revolution.

F-
N
I

* Use our 2-hour Supe
PRESSING Service. W
maintain it for your co
venience at times like thi
when formal clothes d
wand quick servicing.

a

OV ERCOATS
AN OVERCOAT has to be the Real
Thing to fill the bill in an old-fash-
ioned Winter. It must be warm and
soft, but able to take a lot of punish-
ment over a long period of time.
We offer these Overcoats
at Reasonable Prices.
$Q.00 -3 7.5eow0
CONLIN &ETEastashn- ERBEE

.

MILK-ICE CREAM
Special
THANKSGIVING SPECIAL
VANILLA and MINCE ICE CREAM
Superior Dairy Company
Phone 23181

MAJESTIC

MATINEE 2:00 & 3:30
Evening Shows 7 &? 9 P.M.

-. -a
___

I

I

1%a

And I'll pick up you:
ments and have them
to you pressed in 2 f

8-HOUR
CLEANING SERVICE

STEIN CLEANE

204 E. Washington

Phone 2-2567

-:-

MICH IGAN.

PHONE 2-256

7.
e
n-
tis
'e
7
r gar-
iback
hours.
r

-0

w

BIG
DOUBLE
FEATURE

JUST TWO MORE DAYS
THE MAGIC OF MELODY
ROMANCE AND GAY ADVENTURE
ALICE FAME in

Today and Friday
A GRAND SCREEN MYSTERY
hTke 3 9 S t epqs"
with

i'

tMusic Is Magtc"
with BEBE DANIELS - RAY WALKER
MITCHELL and DURANT

TODAY THE FRENCH FILM
"MARIA CHAPDELAINE "
Grand Prix du Cinema Francais
The Gallic cinema at the top ... the nobility of an epic poem.
-New York Times.
As exciting and tragic as anything you're likely to see on the
screen. -New York Sun

Plus

--

(Count of Monte Cristo)
You'll be thrilled, and amused with
the scads of funny quips.

i

( ON STAGE )

NICK LUCAS
alld FiC. .S.

.... .... r .

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