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November 20, 1935 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-11-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIHE MICHIGAN DAILY .

WEDNEgTA Y, NOVEMBER 20, 1935

-V

State Aids In
Drive To Curb
Toll By Traf fic
Three State Officials And
Gov. Fitzgerald Pledge
Support To Drive
Advocate Reforms
Governor Seeks Stricter
Requirements For Auto
Drivers' Licenses
LANSING, NOV. 19.-(P)--Four
agencies of the state government to-
day were behind the campaign to
curb the toll of traffic on Michigan
highways.
The statewide safety campaign was
spurred Monday night when four
state officials, including Gov. Fitz-
gerald, pledged their support to the
drive and advocated reforms designed
to make the traffic lanes safer for the
motorist and pedestrian.
The state government, through four
of its officials, put its power behind
the campaign at a safety mass meet-
ing here.
"It is nice to generalize and say the
highways are the property of all the
people," said Gov. Fitzgerald. "But
we all know the use of our highways
should not be available to those who
cannot use them without endanger-
ing the lives of others."
Suggests Physical Exam
As a remedy he advocated a tight-
ening of requirements for obtaining a
drivers license. He suggested phys-
ical examinations and a provision
that applicants must have a thor-
ough knowledge of traffic laws and be
familiar with handling a machine.
He also urged frequent inspections of
automobiles and declared that the
educational campaign authorized by
the administrative board will be
pressed.
"If drivers don't drive right after
this campaign of education it will be
because they don't care to or be-
cause they lack the physical or men-
tal capacity to handle a motor vehicle
with due regard to the rights of
others."
May Deny Licenses
Through a system being launched
by the department of state petty
traffic offenders may find a barrier
to renewing their licenses, it was an-
bounced by Secretary of State Orville
E. Atwood. He said that a record of
minor accidents is being compiled and
urged enforcing officials to report all
such incidents to his department.
"The time is not far distant when
an applicant will be denied a license
merely because a study of his driving
record has convinced the department
he is not the right kind of driver to
turn loose on the highway," Atwood
asserted. "A bad automobile record
is as much a disgrace as a bad police
record. Cars can kill more than
crime."
Announces New Survey
State Highway Commissioner Mur-
ray D. Van Wagoner announced that
a million dollar traffic survey was
launched Monday with the aid of
Federal funds. A study of conditions
with a view to eliminating hazards
will be the aim, he said.
A campaign of education in the
schools was promised by Eugene B.
Elliott, state superintendent of public
instruction. The campaign will be
designed to have children carry safety
lessohs home to their parents.
Relentless pursuitand sure pun-
ishment of traffic violators are neces-
sary if the traffic toll is to be lessened,
Judge John J. Maher, of the Detroit

traffic court, told the audience at the
meeting.
WHITE TO SPEAK
A talk by Prof. Albert E. White, di-
rector of engineering research, will
feature the third meeting of the A. S.
M. E. Student Branch to be held to-
night at 7:30 in the Union.
Professor White's talk will be on
"Modern Trends in Engineering Re-
search."

Independent Nation To Be Created In China
MA N C H a U K U O
1932 HRE
MON G OL IA *
No INKING
1933 ,+
5 ti oPEIPING
IENTSIN AIREN1895
H u P E N
0 200 400
MILES
-Associated Press Map
Under protection of the Japanese army, an independent nation
comprised of the provinces of Hopeh, Shantung, Shansi, Charar and
Suiyuan is expected to be created soon in northern China. This map
shows the provinces affected, together with other territory "controlled"
by Japan, with dates of acquisition.
Wood Declares Censorship Is
Inherent In A 11 Dictatorsh ps

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
of the evening. The topic of his ad-
dress is: "The Italian-Ethiopian Dis-
pute and Its Background." All grad-
uate students in engineering are in-
vited to attend this meeting.
Weekly Reading Hour: The pro-
gram for Thursday afternoon, No-
vember 21, at 4 o'clock in Room 205
Mason Hall will consist of interpreta-
tions of poetry to be given by the fol-
lowing students:
Elizabeth Anderson, Mary Atlee,
Donald Brackett, Elaine Cobo, Shir-
ley Crosman, Donald Dolan, Kath-
erine Kirwan, Marcella Madison,
Helene Martin, Ruth Moore, Michell
Raskin, Stuart Sheill, Jane Christy,
Francis Alpert, Lewis Berry, Jean
Harrison.
The public is invited to these week-
ly reading hours.
The French Film "Maria Chapde-
lamne," winner of the Grand Prix du
Cinema Francais, with Mlle Made-
leine Renaud of the Comedie-Fran-
caise in the title role, and an addi-
tional French short subject, will be
shown at the Lydia Mendelssohn The-
ater at 4:15 and 8:15, Thursday, Nov.
21. Tickets, 25c, may be procured
at the box office Wednesday and
Thursday.
Michigan Dames: The first meeting
of the Music Group of the Michigan
Dames will be held Thursday eve-
ning,sNov. 21, at the home of Mrs.
Hussey, 595 Riverview Drive. Any-
one interested is invited. Those wish-
ing transportation will meet; at the
League at 7:50 o'oclock.
Exhibitions
Children's Book Exhibit: A book
display to, celebrate Children's Book
Week is being held in the Children's
Library, Room 1400, University Ele-
mentary School, from Wednesday
through Friday, November 20-22.
Children's favorite books are being
featured, as this year the theme for
the week is Reading for Fun. A se-
lection of books published this fall
will be shown also. The library will
be open from eight to eleven morn-
ings, from one to five afternoons, and
from seven-thirty to nine-thirty Wed-
nesday evening. You and, your
friends are cordially invited.

Article By Professor Moore
Is Featured In New Technic.

BREAD POISONED IN SPAIN
MURCIA, Spain, Nov. 19. -(A') -
More than 4,500 familie in Murcia
province were reported today to be
suffering from colic caused by eating
poisonous bread.
The government is sending medical
aid from Madrid.
Jose Merones, proprietor of the
bakery from which the bread came,
has been jailed.

Gives Helpful Advice To
Students In Composing'
Job-Hunting Letters,
An article entitled "Dear Sir:",
written by Prof. A. D. Moore of the
electrical engineering department and,
featured in the November issue of the
Michigan Technic, begins a new ser-
ies of Technic articles concerning the
croblems of employment as they must
be met by engineering students.
The November Technic went on
sale yesterday in the first-floor cor-
ridors of the West and East Engi-
neering buildings at its regular price
of 15 cents. ,
Professor Moore's article gives
helpful advice to engineering stu-
dents on the best methods of writing
a "job-hunting letter." He intro-
duces his article with the remark
"You do not know how to write a job-
hunting letter," and then proceeds
to describe in full detail how such let-
ters should be written. He lays great-
est stress on the presentation of the
job-seeker's personal record in the
proper form and with the correct
factual material that should be in-
cluded.
In inaugurating the employment
series, Professor Moore states: "Al-
though the articles are addressed to
seniors, the hope is that no freshman
will pass them by. We can define a
good senior in 1939 as a man who
learned certain things about the job-
getting business back in 1935, and
began working on himself right
away."
Continuing its policy of including a
SUPERVISOR RESIGNS f
Because he will be absent from Ann
Arbor until May, W. H. Faust, who
was appointed in October to succeed
Harold D. Smith on the county Board
of Supervisors, submitted his resig-
nation to the city council Monday.

two-page picture on some of the lat-
est developments in, engineering, the
Technic presents this month a picture
of the "Flying Yankee," one of the
most recent of stream-lined trains,
the design of which was influenced
to a great extent by experiments con-
ducted in the University's wind tun-
nel.
An article on "Industrial Stream-
lining" by B. L. Springer of the areo-
nautical engineering department ac-
companies the picture.
The "Spotlight" department, which
presents in each issue of the Technic
a few of the most prominent students
in the engineering college, includes
this month Foster Campbell, '36E, H.
Warren Underwood, '36E, and Robert
Warner, '36E.

MILLER
Drug Store
727 North University
Phone 9797
50c BOST
TOOTH PASTE 25c

L6

.1

For Freshmen

Only!!

Prizes For Guessing Score
of Michigan-Ohio State
Game

FIRST PRIZE .....Arrow

SECOND PRIZE...
THIRD PRIZE ....

Shirt and Tie
(Value, $3.50)
Arrow Shirt
(Value, $2.00)
.. Arrow Tie
(Value, $1.50)

Junius B. Wood, former foreign
and special correspondent for thei
Chicago Daily News, who only recent-
ly resigned after 30 years in the serv-
ice of that paper, discussed foreign
news from the correspondent's view-
point in an interview before his ad-
dress on "Your Foreign News" to the
University Press Club of Michigan
here last Friday.
"Censorship is a natural feature
of all dictatorship," he stated, when1
asked what difficulties the European
correspondent encountered now that
he did not meet earlier in the cen-
tury. He pointed out that since
the Nazi regime had begun in Ger-
many, several English and Czecho-
slovakian newsmen had been asked
to leave the country, but only one
American, Dorothy Thompson (Mrs.
Sinclair Lewis) had been barred, al-
though Edgar Ansel Mowrer had been
warned that "it might be better for
him to leave."
He also cited several cases of such
disbarrment of journalists in Fascist
Italy. "Even in France," he pointed
out, "the censorship is pretty strict
now."
"They're all on a war basis now,"
he said, when asked if censorship
conditions approached the war-time
regulations.
As the chief qualification for for-

eign corresponding service, he speci-
fied newspaper experience, obtained
either in this country or as "leg-man"
in one of the European posts. He
suggested a background training in
history, current and past. political
science, and the necessary languages.
He maintained that foreign news,
now as it always has been, is colored
by the policies of the individual news-
papers handling it here in this coun-
try.

WHAT TO DO:
PRIZES will be awarded to those guessing most
nearly correctly the score of the game and the
yardage gained from scrimmage by each team.
Any freshman, in any college of the University
may cast one vote. Ballots must be brought per-
sonally to the store. Contest closes at noon, Nov. 23.

r

1

ROAST - BAKE - COOK
FOR LESS MONEY

COLONIAL INN
303 North Division Street, Tel. 8876
eAnn ounces the FORMAL OPENING
Friday, November 22
Serving Dinner 5:30 to 7:30
___REGULAR HOURS
Luncheon: 11:30 to 1:30 Dinner: 5:30 to 7:30

EVERHOT,
ROASTER.
A cool clean way to bake, roast,
can or cook a whole meal. Cur-
rent is on only 50% of the time
but a uniform temperature is
maintained.

GIVE A GUESS ! !

YOU MAY WIN!!

Michigan Score..................
Ohio State's Score.
Yards- Gained from Scrimmage-
Michigan........... Ohio State
Name
Address....
Phone Number. .. . . . . . . ..

$16.95

IL

I

11

1

m

THE ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION

presents

Schienker
HARDWARE CO.

SINCE 114A..

HARRY L. HOPKINS
Federal Emergency Relief Administrator and
Head of the Works Progress Administration
speaking on

STATE

S THE ET

213-215 W. Liberty

Ph. 8575

I

E

Problems of Government"
Hill Auditorium - Monday, Nov. 25, 8:15 P.M.
Tickets at WAHR'S - 75c & 50c

SEN IORSI,

1

I

III

The New 1936 MICHIGAN-
ENSIAN is designed for you.
Have your photograph tak-
en NOW at one of the offi-
cial 'Ensian Photographers.

.1

40

Deadline Date is December 1

You will want your pic-

I ture to appear amona

II

1 1111

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