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November 02, 1935 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-11-02

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PAGE SIX.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2,1935

PAGE SIX SATURDAY, NOVE1~LBER 2,1935

Unbeaten
Iowa Favored
To Overcome
Hoosier Squad

Gophers

Face Major

Test

In

Game

With Purdue

Williams Is Keyman In Ohio-Notre Dame Tilt

BBTheIL RSTOVE
By BILLRED

Northwestern And Illinois
Seek First Big Ten Win
In Game At Evanston
CHICAGO, Nov. 1. - (P) - The Big
Ten's football championship brew, a
mixture of national and conference
title ingredients, comes to a boil to-
morrow.
The national championship boiling,
of.course, will be done at Columbus,
0., where the "Scarlet Scourge" of
Ohio State, unbeaten and not ser-
iously pressed in four games, steps
out in an effort to prove it is just as
potent as people have been saying it
is, against Notre Dame. The Irish,
also undefeated, have been pressed,
but so far have had what it took to
withstand the pressure. The 87,000
spectators in the big horseshoe sta-
dium figure to see every bit as much
of a battle as they expect.
Gophers Favored
Up at Minenapolis, Minnesota,
battling for at least a piece of the
Big Ten title, and not altogether
free of national championship no-
tions, meets Purdue. The Boilermak-
ers no longer hope for more than a
share of conference honors since los-
ing to Carnegie Tech last week, but
,may be expected to give the Gophers
a rousing struggle. Minnesota will
be favored, but not by much. The
Boilermakers defeated Chicago and
Northwestern in their two conference
starts, while Minnesota whipped
Northwestern in its only league game.
Iowa, victor over Illinois in its first
Big Ten assignment, seeks to main-
tain a title pace against Indiana at
Iowa City. The swift, rugged Iowans
appear to be strong enough to make
it two victories, but are pretty cer-
tain of having their hands full. The
Hoosiers have been threatening to
upset someone, and tomorrow may
see them doing it.
n Ilini In Comeback
There will be no championship
business involved when Illinois and
Northwestern clash at Evanston, but
each eleven has something at stake.
The Illini will be taking to the come-
back trail, while Northwestern, beat-
en by Purdue, Ohio State and Min-
nesota, but improved in every game,
sees the spot for a first Big Ten vic-
tory of the season..
Mischigan will tackle Pennsylvania
with one eye on its conference tussle
at Illinois next week. Chicago and
Wisconsin, which meet Ohio State
and Purdue, respectively, a week
hence, have open dates.
Record Crowd
Expected For
UC.L.A. Game
LOS ANGELES, Nov. 1. - (P) -
There were strong indications today
that a new all-time attendance rec-
ord for football west of the Mississippi
River would be set here Saturday in
the clash of two undefeated and un-
tied elevens - California and the
University of California at Los An-
geles.
More than 75,000 tickets had been
sold when the offices were closed last
night and it was reasonable to expect
that 20,000 more would betdoled out
before the start of the contest which
may decide the Pacific Coast Confer-
ence title and Rose Bowl rights.
The largest local grid gathering
witnessed the 1932 NotregDame-
Southern California encounter when
92,588 cash customers put their mon-
ey on the line to see Troy take a
trouncing.
Should Memorial Coliseum be sold
out approximately 105,000 persons
would jam into the concrete bowl for
the first time since the opening cere-
mony of the Olympic Games.

Dartmouth Seeks
To End Yale Jinx
NEW HAVEN, Conn., Nov. 1.~-
Another unbeaten Dartmouth eleven
invades the Yale Bowl this afternoon
hoping to smash one of the most fam-
ous of all gridiron jinxes. Not since
the Blue and Green began relations
in 1884 have the men of Hanover
downed the Elis.

-Associated Press Photo.
"Jumping Joe" Williams, ace halfback of the Ohio State football
team, who has been amazing grid fans with his remarkable running
ability, is looked upon by many as the key to the Buckeye-Notre Dame
situation this afternoon when the nation's grid leaders play for cham-
pionship honors in the country's number one game of the day. A
crowd of 87,000 is expected to fill the double-decker stands at Columbus
to overflowing.
Pennsylvania Will Attempt To
Prolong 'Jinx' Over Wolverines

IF JOHN SMITHERS has any wor-
ries about the effect of the loss
of a front tooth on his personal ap-
pearance he at least has a precedent
in Wallie Weber.
Back when Wallie was establishing
a reputation as the roughest, tough-
est fullback in the Western Confer-
ence, he too lost a front tooth. Grum-
bling in the showers after the game,
someone overheard his mutterings.
"Losing a tooth isn't so bad," Wallie
was saying, "but it's fable to ruin.
my looks."
Sid Dewey, according to all
who knew him while he was here,
was a character whose only coun-
terpart in recent years was John
Kowalik, which is a significant
clue to his personality.
He is remembered principally for
his part in the memorable Michigan-
Northwestern football battle in 1925,
the battle in the mud. Walter Eck-
ersall, dean of American officials at
the time, was refereeing the game,
and was of course being accorded the
respect and courtesy due him in his
position.
Dewey, however, was an individual-
ist. Suddenly, after the ball had been
downed and buried in a puddle, he
picked it up and threw it straight at
the white-clad figure of Eckersall.
"Here you are, Eckie old boy," he
yelled, and went back to the play.
REMINISCING yesterday, Bennie
Oosterbaan was recalling his
first varsity game. Playing at tackle
for Michigan was a big fellow who,
to say the least, was not a warm
weather player. The day was hot,
and the tackle had been calling for
water after every play, so Oosterbaan
was sent in with instructions to put
a stop to those calls.
Lining up after the first play,
Bennie, according to instructions,
told the tackle, "The Old Man
says if you yell for water again
it's the last time you'll ever play
in a Michigan uniform." The
only answer the three-time All-
American got was a snarled,
"Shut up, you blankety-blank,
cocky sophomore."
Roundy Coughlin, whose pseudo-
ignorance is nothing more nor less
than genius, told the other day in his
column in the Wisconsin State Jour-
nal about another one of those un-
known identity situations.
Bob Zuppke went to see Ohio and
Northwestern play two weeks ago,
and while riding in a taxi engaged
the driver in conversation. The driver
bubbled over about the Buckeyes.
"Aren't you afraid of Illinois?"
Zupp asked.
"That's a laugh," was the answer,
"we'll drop those babies on the city
dump the night of Nov. 16."
R)undy, it must be remembered
is the guy who was sent by Pres-
ident Glenn Frank to take charge
of the pep meeting before the
Michigan - Wisconsin footall
gaime because "he could talk
English that would be under-
stood."
The Pennsylvania football team,
here for the week-end, does not be-

lieve in over-exertion. The special
train of the Quakers was pulled into
the tracks opposite the Stadium yes-
terday morning, 100 yards from the
field. But in spite of the distance, a
bus had been ordered to take them
to the gates. Failure of the bus to
show up forced them to walk any-
way, however.
And the staff concensus. Pennsyl-
vania gets the call from but four out
of twelve, while Ohio State and Notre
Dame are balanced seven to five in
favor of the Buckeyes. Both sides
on the latter game, have affixed
notes "and I have money where my
mouth is."
Michigan (8), Penn (4).
Ohio State (7), Notre Dame (5).
Minnesota (10), Purdue (2).
Illinois (10), Northwestern (2).
Indiana (0), Iowa (12).
Mississippi State (0), Army (12).
Michigan State (12), Temple (0).
Dartmouth (1), Yale (11).
Carnegie Tech (12), Duquesne (0).
Fordham (1), Pittsburgh (11).
Navy (7), Princeton (5).
Southern Methodist (12), Texas
(0).
Alabama (11), Kentucky (1).
Auburn (4), Louisiana State (8).
Tennessee (2), Duke 10).
Colgate (10), Tulane (2).
North Carolina (7), N. Carolina
State (5).
California (3), U.C.L.A. (9).
Santa Clara (1), Stanford (11).
Texas Christian (9), Baylor (3).
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Army Mules Meet Colgate Travels South
Intersectional Foe1 For Game With Tuliae
NEW ORLEANS, Ia., Nov. 1.-
NEW YORK, N. Y., Nov. 1.- - Andy Kerr has brought his Colgate
Coach Ralph Sasse brought his Mis- eleven south to meet Tulane's Green
sissippi State team to town today, Wave in a leading intersectional
fresh from a victory over Alabama game scheduled for this afternoon.
last Saturday, to battle the Army Both teams have had disappointing
mules in what is expected to be one of seasons to date.
A===ete =adio Service
1. PHILCO and SPARTAN Home Radios
2. Radios for Rent.
3. Radio Parts for Amateurs.
4. Power Amplifiers for Rent.
5. Radio Repairs - All Makes.
6. Automobile Radios and Service.
e oe
Purchase e rv ice

- CALLS FOR
Om@C o'in9

By FRED DELANO
Michigan, "champions of the west"
and long a leading dreadnaught in
the nation's gridiron wars, has
amassed a spectacular record since
the innovation of football into Ann
Arbor but there are four teams in
the country, Pennsylvania, Cornell,
Harvard and Yale, that have been
able to beat the Wolverines more
often than those same Wolverines
have conquered them.
Every other school that Michigan
has met in at least two grid encoun-
ters has felt the sting of the Wol-
verines far more often than it could
deal out punishment. Pennsylvania's
Quakers, one of those four "jinx"
clubs, invades the camp of Harry
Kipke's gridders this afternoon and
will be out to show Michigan Home-
coming fans that Penn's power is still
superior to Wolverine passing, punt-
ing and praying.
Have Met 13 Times
Thirteen times have Michigan and
Penn clashed on the gridiron and
seven times Penn ended on the right
end of the score. Four times Field-
ing "Hurry-Up" Yost's charges, for
all of the thirteen games were played'
prior to 1918 and 12 of them when I
Yost was head coach, managed to
beat Penn and -twice the teams played
scoreless ties.
A victory over Coach Harmon's
Navy Rests Before
Game With Tigers
ANNAPOLIS, Md., Nov. 1. - (P) -
Navy contented itself with a light
work-out Thursday and looked f or-
ward to its journey to Princeton to-
morrow to meet the Tigers in their
home lair.
The Naval Academy band, Bill,
the Navy's goat mascot, and 1,000
midshipmen will accompany the team
on the trip, hoping to cheer the Tars
to their first win in three starts.
Fay E. Wilsie, 175-pounder who
has been understudying for Dick
Pratt at the quarterback post, has
been working out in the fullback po-
sition and may get the call. A good
defensive and offensive player, Wilsie
will have Pratt, Tom King and Sneed
Schmidt as his backfield mates.

Quakers Saturday will be particu-
larly gratifying to the Michigan
alumni of pre-war days who dislike
the memory of what Penn has done
here in the past and are hopeful that
Michigan will successfully clear one
more hurdle on the path back to the
top of the football world. The last
time Penn and Michigan clashed was
in 1917 and the team from Phila-
delphia won 16-0.
It was not until last year that ar-
rangements were made for the
schools to renew athletic relations
and now the teams will not only meet
this season but also for the three fol-
lowing years.
Victories No Accident
That there was no accident in
Penn's victories over Michigan in
early years of the century can be
seen by glancing at the Wolverine
record during those years. Twice the
Penn defeat was the only one suffered
by Michigan during an entire season
and the other five Quaker wins came
in seasons when only one other team
was able to outpoint Yost's club.
The record of Penn-Michigan
games:

eAFTER THE GAME, follow the crowds down to
Prekete's Sugar Bowl for a good meal that gets
you all set for a grand evening. We serve the
best quality foods, prepared with that extra
tastiness that makes you realize what Homecom-
ing really is.
WE SERVE OUR OWN SPRING WATER.
PREFKETE S,

109 SOUTH

MAIN STREET

m

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Michigan
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Michigan
Michigan

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Penn
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II

KING'S TAVER N ALE
ON DRAUGHT
at
THE OLD GERMAN RESTAURANT
HAAB BROTHERS 120 W. Washington St., 1 Block West of Main

I

3

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II

Welcome.
MEN OF MICHIGAN
We are always glad to have a chance
to meet our old friends again . .
Just as Homecoming is a tradition, so is the quality and
style of merchandise which Michigan men have learned
to expect from us. K We are now prepared to show
you a wide selection of OVERCOATS ranging from
$35.00

II

GREETINGS, ALUMNI

7ThTC''T'TNTI' "T'T VT TNTTlTTTTTIT T A T

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